Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Lake Youngs’

Originally published in the Seattle Times, June 16, 1982

By Cathy Reiner
Times South bureau

King County Police Capt. James O’Brien would like to move his Precinct 3 (Southeast King County) police operations to the soon-to-be-vacated Fire District 43 fire station in Maple Valley.

Fire District 43 Chief Dwight Van Zanen would like to sell the fire station.

If the county and fire district commissioners agree, the move could solve some thorny problems for both police and fire operations. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, May 2000

By Barbara Nilson

Photos by Sherrie Acker

The “action” in the 1920s to 1950s, from Seattle south, was at the lake resorts in the Valley. Memories of those glory days were shared at the March program with Dolores Gaffney and Janet Bertagni talking about Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness resort, and Gloria Foss remembering the family’s resort on Shadow Lake.

Lake Wilderness resorts

Attending the historical society program on resorts were, from left, Janet Bertagni, Dolores Gaffney Judge, and Bernadine Gaffney Gebenini.

Dolores Gaffney, daughter of Tom Gaffney, reported her father and his brother Kain purchased the property on Lake Wilderness in 1926 from Abraham and Sam Cohen. The family moved to the lake and the resort opened in the spring of 1927 as Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness.

At that time there were three small family resorts on the lake. Dieckman with his two sons, Jeff and Don, had just started one, and across the lake was McKinney’s. McKinney’s also had a dance hall that was two stories high that they eventually turned into a skating rink. In April 1939 McKinneys sold their place to Gaffneys.

One of the older buildings was used for a dance hall, said Dolores, and they used kerosene lamps. In 1936 they built a new dance hall after the old one burned down. They had a 30-foot-high diving board as well as cabins, tennis courts, picnic areas, ball fields, and playgrounds.

In 1949 Diekmans and Gaffneys were combined and the Gaffneys decided to build a lodge. The design was developed by Young, Richardson and Carlson and won the grand prize from the Washington Chapter of Architects in 1951 and the top award from the American Institute in New York in 1952. The center column totem pole was carved by the famous Doug McCarter. It is 35 feet tall and weighs ten tons. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 26, 1900

A Christmas Day event

Reports of tests received at city hall by telephone—Two weeks more will elapse before water is turned into the reservoirs—Assistant City Engineer Scott makes good his predictions

The Landsburg dam is used to divert drinking water from the Cedar River to the pipeline serving the City of Seattle. The original dam was constructed in 1900 and updated in 1935, as shown here. (From Black Diamond NOW.)

The Landsburg dam is used to divert drinking water from the Cedar River to the pipeline serving the City of Seattle. The original dam was constructed in 1900 and updated in 1935, as shown here. (From Black Diamond NOW.)

Cedar River water flowed into the city limits of Seattle Monday night at 10 o’clock through the mains of the new gravity system. Unknown to the general public the water from the river was let into the main pipe line filling it almost to its greatest capacity and was then allowed to flow into the main trunk sewer at Twelfth Avenue South and Lane Street, by which it found its way into Elliott Bay.

Twelve days ago Assistant City Engineer Scott , who has charge of the work on the pipe line and at the intake on the river decided if possible to carry out the prediction he made six months ago that water from Cedar River would flow into the city limits on Christmas day, 1900. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 7, 1977

Cedar River turned big, brown, and ugly again on December 2nd and 3rd this year on the exact anniversary of the 1975 major flood. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Times, November 10, 1963

By Lucile McDonald

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

One of the curiosities uncovered during freeway construction was a tar-coated 40-inch steel pipe laid down the west side of Capital Hill. Two sections were dug out and discarded for scrap, the rest was plugged with cement and left buried in the slope.

Workmen who witnessed removal of this obstacle to the path of progress may not have known they were viewing the penstock which fed Cedar River water into the first electric power plant on Lake Union. The public has forgotten thoroughly the function of a small structure hemmed in by the King County Welfare Department’s medical service office and the City Light’s stand-by steam plant at Eastlake Avenue and Nelson Place.

The building is completely empty except for a table and chairs in a room used as a voting precinct once or twice a year. If you go around in back, you can see where Lake Union once lapped at the base of the rear wall and a tail race poured out water from the Volunteer Park reservoir after its force had driven the Pelton bucket wheel of the old electric generator inside the little building.

The pipes carried the reservoir overflow down the hill, one being the penstock and the other a drain, still in use, that had been relocated at a lower level.

Through these pipes, Cedar River water mingled with Lake Union and flowed out into Salmon Bay before there was a ship canal.

The Cedar has been much manipulated by man. Its water flows into hundreds of thousands of homes and the current it generates partially lights them. It supplies most of the make-up water needed to operate the ship canal’s Chittenden Locks. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Globe News, October 31, 1973

By our county news bureau

A proposed Black Diamond-Lake Sawyer interceptor would start at the west city limits, extend north past the western shores of Lake Sawyer, turn west of 272 St. SE and extend to Timberlane at the Covington Pump Station where it would join the existing Cascade Sewer System force main extending into Kent. The city of Black Diamond, the Lake Sawyer, Lake Wilderness and Pipe Lake areas would be required to provide local sewerage collection before connecting to the main interceptor.

A proposed Black Diamond-Lake Sawyer interceptor would start at the west city limits, extend north past the western shores of Lake Sawyer, turn west of 272 St. SE and extend to Timberlane at the Covington Pump Station where it would join the existing Cascade Sewer System force main extending into Kent. The City of Black Diamond, the Lake Sawyer, Lake Wilderness and Pipe Lake areas would be required to provide local sewerage collection before connecting to the main interceptor.

A sewerage system planned but dropped three or four years ago is once more underway, county officials announced this week.

The area to be served by the projected $1 million system is east of Auburn at Black Diamond, Lake Morton, and Lake Sawyer, where pollution problems have been increasing due to inadequate septic tank drain fields and growing population pressures. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 11, 1977

By Diana Kalanquin

The Petersen sisters by their parlor stove along with the author of this article, Diana Kalanquin.

The Petersen sisters by their parlor stove along with the author of this article, Diana Kalanquin.

Ellen and Anna Petersen have lived in Maple Valley for 80 years—all their lives.

They remember the Indians, sleigh rides in the winter, the old-time schools, all-day trips to Renton, and much more.

The Petersens started school shortly after the turn of the century at Crosson School, which is now the Judd home.

“We remember,” they said, “when the Indians came every October to pick cranberries on Otter Lake. He could hear the rigs come in some way off, and our teacher, Miss Carrie Smith, would tell us, “You better be good or the Indians will get you.”

“Believe me, you could hear a pin drop in that school!” Anna recalled. “Everybody ducked their heads under their desks.”

This interviewer was given the impression that the arrows were going to start flying any minute.

Asked if they were afraid of the Indians, the two sisters replied, “We weren’t scared of them; we were scared of what we’d heard about them.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »