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Posts Tagged ‘Landsburg’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 16, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

Memories are becoming more dear to the pioneers of this area as progress changes the very face of the land.

For instance, where the new Primary State Highway No. 2, Echo Lake Branch, now under construction, will cross a stretch of swampy ground on a viaduct near Hobart, east of Maple Valley, a large mill once made the countryside echo with the sound of saws and the blast of its whistle summoning men to work.

The highway climbs along Holder Creek Canyon through vestiges of a forest that fed its logs to the Wood & Iverson mill from 1913 to 1941. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Over the near century from 1885 to 1982, Maple Valley hosted three different railroad stations, all located in old Maple Valley just north of where Highway 18 overpasses SR-169. This photo of the third Maple Valley depot dates to 1953 shortly after it was built.

The Maple Valley station was an important cog for directing rail traffic as trains could be switched to Black Diamond, Taylor, or up the Cedar River through Landsburg into the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 2009

By Barbara Nilson

The Louis Krall family celebrates their mother’s birthday in 1958 at the Kennydale home of Nancy and Don Krall. Back row: Larry, Don and Hank; front row: Ann, Mrs. (Emily) Louis Krall, mother; Emily and Marie. (Photo loaned by Krall family).

The Louis Krall family celebrates their mother’s birthday in 1958 at the Kennydale home of Nancy and Don Krall. Back row: Larry, Don and Hank; front row: Ann, Mrs. (Emily) Louis Krall, mother; Emily and Marie. (Photo loaned by Krall family).

[Saturday, April 18, 2009, the Louis Krall family shared memories of growing up on their farm established in 1911 on the Hobart-Taylor Road. The program was sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society. The presentation was given by Jeanette Dunn, daughter of Emily (Krall) and Ernest Costanzo, and extended family members including her uncles, Larry and Don Krall.]

Jeanette Dunn’s grandparents, Emily and Louis Krall, along with their first born, a daughter Marie, emigrated from what is now Slovakia in 1911. Marie was born in Austria/Hungry and was six months old when they took the USS Kaiser Wilhelm from Brennan, Germany to New York. They intended to join Louis’ brothers who were already in America and Canada. They came to Washington through Canada in 1911.

Louis was a miner and worked in local mines at Ravensdale, Landsburg, Taylor, and Franklin. The family lived in Taylor and Franklin for a short time before moving to Hobart. He later worked at the clay plant in Taylor as did several of his sons. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 19, 1976

bigfootEditor, the Voice:
When I was associated with the Cedar River Watershed, I covered almost every square foot of it by car, truck, plane, snowshoes, skis, and by foot.

Late one afternoon in early June, I was checking on the snow level in the vicinity of Goat Mountain when I walked into a colony of Sasquatch or the Bigfoot people as they are commonly called.

This was a colony of 31 people. They were very friendly with no spoken language, but they had developed a very refined sign language. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 14, 1976

Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Railway Company bridge damaged after a flood, Maple Valley, 1911

Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Railway Company bridge damaged after a flood, Maple Valley, 1911

As bad as the December 1975 flood on the Cedar River was, the “Granddaddy of them all” occurred on November 19, 1911, when flashboard failure at the City of Seattle Dam dumped 14,200 cubic feet per second down the narrow Cedar.

Measured again in c.f.s. there have been three other floods that topped last December’s disaster; in 1903, 1906, and 1909.

The December 1975 flood, however, was bad enough. Its out pour of 7,800 c.f.s. was the greatest in 64 years. (more…)

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Entire valley under water and the junction shut off from outside communication

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 5, 1903

The Denny-Renton Clay Co.’s first factory was located at Van Asselt, located near today’s Boeing Field. It was named for Henry Van Asselt (pictured), one of the county’s first pioneers. To learn more about Henry Van Asselt, read this article from the <a href="http://sococulture.org/duwamish-pioneer-served-civil-war-militia/" target="_blank">South King County Cultural Coalition</a>.

The Denny-Renton Clay Co.’s first factory was located at Van Asselt, located near today’s Boeing Field. It was named for Henry Van Asselt, one of the county’s first pioneers. To learn more about Henry Van Asselt, read this article from the South King County Cultural Coalition.

BLACK RIVER, Monday, Jan. 5—The entire valley is practically under water. The river is higher than ever known before. Late last evening water raised until the Columbia & Puget Sound track was flooded and washed out for a quarter of a mile. Great damage was done the Northern Pacific double track between here and Argo. Two bridges and many culverts are gone and railway traffic is entirely suspended. There is a great loss of livestock reported. No human lives have been lost.

The river reached its height about midnight and is now falling. The highway between here and Orillia is impassible except by boat. The interurban railway is practically all gone between Kent and Van Asselt. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 27, 1964

By Lucile McDonald

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

From high places around Hobart, where Bill Peacock has spent 77 of his nearly 80 years, he can view the new sweep of the Echo Lake cutoff highway and automobiles traveling along it at a fast clip.

The final section penetrates foothill country that not too long ago had only roads made with pick, shovel and wheelbarrow.

Peacock used to travel a long circuit over them once a week making meat deliveries. He believes he was the first person to drive a team and wagon into some of the communities along the Pacific Coast Railroad. The branch line later was torn up and the towns are now defunct. (more…)

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