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Posts Tagged ‘Landsburg’

Originally published in the Seattle Times, November 10, 1963

By Lucile McDonald

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

One of the curiosities uncovered during freeway construction was a tar-coated 40-inch steel pipe laid down the west side of Capital Hill. Two sections were dug out and discarded for scrap, the rest was plugged with cement and left buried in the slope.

Workmen who witnessed removal of this obstacle to the path of progress may not have known they were viewing the penstock which fed Cedar River water into the first electric power plant on Lake Union. The public has forgotten thoroughly the function of a small structure hemmed in by the King County Welfare Department’s medical service office and the City Light’s stand-by steam plant at Eastlake Avenue and Nelson Place.

The building is completely empty except for a table and chairs in a room used as a voting precinct once or twice a year. If you go around in back, you can see where Lake Union once lapped at the base of the rear wall and a tail race poured out water from the Volunteer Park reservoir after its force had driven the Pelton bucket wheel of the old electric generator inside the little building.

The pipes carried the reservoir overflow down the hill, one being the penstock and the other a drain, still in use, that had been relocated at a lower level.

Through these pipes, Cedar River water mingled with Lake Union and flowed out into Salmon Bay before there was a ship canal.

The Cedar has been much manipulated by man. Its water flows into hundreds of thousands of homes and the current it generates partially lights them. It supplies most of the make-up water needed to operate the ship canal’s Chittenden Locks. (more…)

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Originally published in a Palmer Coking Coal Co. memorandum, 1964

palmer-coking-coal-coFor the last thirty-odd years, Palmer Coking Coal Co., Inc. has been in continuous operation as a vital part of the economy of the area in and around Black Diamond. Its people have had steady and secure employment at good wages these many years.

In a basic industry, such as mining, the direct benefits to the economy of an area are greatly reinforced by indirect and related jobs that are necessary to support a mining operation. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 27, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

“We’ve lived in coal revivals since 1915. We have spurts and then, they fall off,” observed John Markus, Sr., proprietor of Ravensdale’s principal place of business, a grocery on the Kent-Kangley Road.

The little community with the euphonious name in South King County’s coal belt is about to have another “spurt,” however. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 16, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

This huge sawmill was the center of the Wood & Iverson operations in Hobart from 1913 to 1941. The mill pond was in the foreground. The site now is an area of swampy ground which will be crossed by a new road.

Memories are becoming more dear to the pioneers of this area as progress changes the very face of the land.

For instance, where the new Primary State Highway No. 2, Echo Lake Branch, now under construction, will cross a stretch of swampy ground on a viaduct near Hobart, east of Maple Valley, a large mill once made the countryside echo with the sound of saws and the blast of its whistle summoning men to work.

The highway climbs along Holder Creek Canyon through vestiges of a forest that fed its logs to the Wood & Iverson mill from 1913 to 1941. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Over the near century from 1885 to 1982, Maple Valley hosted three different railroad stations, all located in old Maple Valley just north of where Highway 18 overpasses SR-169. This photo of the third Maple Valley depot dates to 1953 shortly after it was built.

The Maple Valley station was an important cog for directing rail traffic as trains could be switched to Black Diamond, Taylor, or up the Cedar River through Landsburg into the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 2009

By Barbara Nilson

The Louis Krall family celebrates their mother’s birthday in 1958 at the Kennydale home of Nancy and Don Krall. Back row: Larry, Don and Hank; front row: Ann, Mrs. (Emily) Louis Krall, mother; Emily and Marie. (Photo loaned by Krall family).

The Louis Krall family celebrates their mother’s birthday in 1958 at the Kennydale home of Nancy and Don Krall. Back row: Larry, Don and Hank; front row: Ann, Mrs. (Emily) Louis Krall, mother; Emily and Marie. (Photo loaned by Krall family).

[Saturday, April 18, 2009, the Louis Krall family shared memories of growing up on their farm established in 1911 on the Hobart-Taylor Road. The program was sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society. The presentation was given by Jeanette Dunn, daughter of Emily (Krall) and Ernest Costanzo, and extended family members including her uncles, Larry and Don Krall.]

Jeanette Dunn’s grandparents, Emily and Louis Krall, along with their first born, a daughter Marie, emigrated from what is now Slovakia in 1911. Marie was born in Austria/Hungry and was six months old when they took the USS Kaiser Wilhelm from Brennan, Germany to New York. They intended to join Louis’ brothers who were already in America and Canada. They came to Washington through Canada in 1911.

Louis was a miner and worked in local mines at Ravensdale, Landsburg, Taylor, and Franklin. The family lived in Taylor and Franklin for a short time before moving to Hobart. He later worked at the clay plant in Taylor as did several of his sons. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 19, 1976

bigfootEditor, the Voice:
When I was associated with the Cedar River Watershed, I covered almost every square foot of it by car, truck, plane, snowshoes, skis, and by foot.

Late one afternoon in early June, I was checking on the snow level in the vicinity of Goat Mountain when I walked into a colony of Sasquatch or the Bigfoot people as they are commonly called.

This was a colony of 31 people. They were very friendly with no spoken language, but they had developed a very refined sign language. (more…)

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