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Posts Tagged ‘Lawson Hill’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, August 31, 1994

Wally’s World by W.J. DuChateau

You may recall the time Evelyn pelted her husband, Joe, with eggs. It happened at one of the Black Diamond’s “egg contests,” in which couples try to softly catch eggs that are lofted back and forth between partners. But toward the end of this particular contest, things disintegrated into a general free-for-all; to paraphrase Ken Kesey’s popular observation, the game turned into a first-class egg-storm. Just ask Joe. (If you’re so inclined, it’s a wonderful way to garner revenge on your spouse.)

Or maybe you recall scrambling about in a pile of straw or shavings, anxiously searching for a few pennies, nickels, or dimes—the exact denomination depending upon the year and inflation rate at the time. But no matter how valuable the coins, you literally beamed with the joy and excitement of finding them.

It was called, perhaps inaccurately, a “penny hunt.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 21, 1925

When Portland, Oregon, recently held its Home Beautiful Exposition, Ralph C. Dean, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Portland Depot, lost no time in demonstrating to the citizens of the Columbia River metropolis that Diamond Briquets were the ideal fuel to make beautiful homes comfortable as well.

This picture shows the booth which was arranged by R.R. English, city salesman, and which carried the message of Diamond Briquets to many Portland homes. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 12, 1925

Peter Bertoldi is the agent for the Pacific Coast Coal Company at its Georgetown Depot. This view shows him in front of his office at 5422 Duwamish Avenue.

Black Diamond Doings

Camp to possess model ball park

Final touches have now been put on the Black Diamond baseball park, which will make it one of the finest diamonds outside of the league parks. Grass seed has recently been planted on the infield, and two new dugouts have been built, and in addition the whole field has been carefully gone over and put in A-1 shape for the season.

The recent sunshine has brought out the baseball aspirants, and judging from the early work-outs Black Diamond will have a wealth of material from which to build up a first class ball team this season.

New uniforms have been ordered, of a solid grey color, with the company trade mark on the left breast and an orange diamond with a black letter “B” on black caps. The socks are black and white. The uniforms are on display this week in the windows of Piper & Taft in Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, March 2007

Howard Botts

Howard Botts

Black Diamond is my favorite subject since I’ve lived there all my life. I think these two towns, Maple Valley and Black Diamond, have some things in common; a couple of them are Highway 169 and railroads.

People in Seattle heard that the Northern Pacific was coming to this area and going to Tacoma.

They felt if they couldn’t have that they were going to build their own railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla over the pass. So they started in 1873, got as far as Renton in 1876; then extended it to Newcastle. In 1880 Henry Villard, of the Northern Pacific, bought it from the Black Diamond Coal Company and renamed it the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 5, 1925

Every concern is on the lookout for good men and that is why you seldom hear a good man complaining about not getting enough salary. When the firm he is with fails to pay him all his services are worth someone else is going to come along and do it. — Coleman Cox. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 24, 1913

Blast in Black Diamond Mine, of unknown origin, kills workman—his fellows in serious condition

Violation of rules suspected as cause: Required precautions observed by Pacific Coast Co., exposed lamp or match thought to blame

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

Jack Jackson was killed and Ned Rossi and Eugene Pelline, miners, were seriously burned in an explosion this morning on the tenth level of No. 14 mine at Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, February 1992

By Ann Steiert

Antique sewing machines are on display on the lower level of the museum.

Antique sewing machines are on display on the lower level of the museum.

Most of the time when “old times” are written about there is a tendency to write about things long gone and completely antiquated. There is an organization that has been in existence since 1943 and is still meeting [1992]. It is the Lawson Hill Sewing Club.

In 1943 a group of ladies, all living on the hill, got together for a social evening. There were about 20, more or less, at the first meeting. The first meeting was held at the home of Fern Denny who lived in the house now occupied by the Joe Dal Santo family. (more…)

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