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Posts Tagged ‘Lawson’

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, February 1980

C&PS Engine 18 photographed in Black Diamond before 1916. Type: 4-4-0; Builder, Alco-Brooks; Const. No. 48295; Date built, July 1910; Drivers 62; Cyls 18x24; Total Wt. 110,000.

C&PS Engine 18 photographed in Black Diamond before 1916. Type: 4-4-0; Builder, Alco-Brooks; Const. No. 48295; Date built, July 1910; Drivers 62; Cyls 18×24; Total Wt. 110,000.

The Black Diamond Company wanted a railroad completed as quickly as possible because the Mt. Diablo coal field was declining fast. Surveying began under the Oregon Improvement Company in April 1882 for a Columbia and Puget Sound Cedar River extension. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1904

The Pacific Coast Company has inaugurated an eight-hour day and raised wages of all laborers in its mines.

The changes are made effective October 1.

The increase is voluntary on the part of the company and was made without application by the men. In fact, the first intimation the men had of the changed conditions was given when notices were posted under the direction of Chief Engineer James Anderson announcing the higher scale was effective. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 2, 1902

One man, supposed to have been lost, turns up safe and well

Inquest being held by Coroner Hoye this afternoon

BLACK DIAMOND, Friday, Oct. 2 — The number of victims of the explosion in the Lawson mine Wednesday night at present numbers eleven, with the possibility that two of the injured will die as a result of their hurts.

Until a late hour last night all but one of the bodies has been recovered. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 14, 1910

Entire town of Black Diamond attends funeral of men who lost lives in Lawson slope one week ago

Bodies of fire boss and companion found; identification made with great difficulty—water prevents recovery of five corpses remaining in mine

The Seattle Star reported that 1,500 people turned out for one funeral following the November 6, 1910, Lawson Mine disaster. Last rites were conducted at the St. Barbara Catholic Church. The procession stretched from the church on Lawson Hill to the Black Diamond Cemetery as eight of the miners were buried in one grave.

The Seattle Star reported that 1,500 people turned out for one funeral following the November 6, 1910, Lawson Mine disaster. Last rites were conducted at the St. Barbara Catholic Church. The procession stretched from the church on Lawson Hill to the Black Diamond Cemetery as eight of the miners were buried in one grave.

Eight of the ten bodies of the men who lost their lives on the Lawson slope of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s mine at Black Diamond, were buried yesterday at the mining town. Eight caskets were lowered into one grave while almost the entire population of the town looked on. The recovery of the other two bodies today will be followed by an early burial because of their condition.

An inquest to determine the responsibility for the explosion which killed fifteen men on Sunday, November 6, will be conducted by Coroner James C. Snyder next Sunday. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 12, 1910

Wrecked mine car located under mass of wreckage and falls at Black Diamond and bodies recovered

Search party works under great handicap; remains of Foreman Lunden only one to be identified—others may be laid away in common grave

Tombstone for Dave Lunden, Lawson Mine fire boss.

Tombstone for Dave Lunden, Lawson Mine fire boss.

Located under the mass of wreckage and falls where it had lain since the explosion of dust and black damp last Sunday morning, the mine car containing the bodies of the ten repair men caught on the Lawson slope was uncovered last evening and all the bodies were found. The removal to the surface has since been conducted with dispatch but only after greatest hardships on the part of the rescuing party.

All the bodies are in such a state of decomposition that only the body of Dave Lunden, fire boss, in charge of the crew, has been identified. A common grave may be the lot of the others. The bodies of the five men caught at the bottom of the slope, on the No. 6 level, may not be recovered for days, if at all. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 8, 1910

Experts to decide rescue operations

With representatives of miners’ local, they will determine whether work shall be continued—Company prepared to adopt recommendation

One of the rescuers, Vitalis Marckx—fourth from the left—was supposed to work that fateful Sunday.

One of the rescuers, Vitalis Marckx—fourth from the left—was supposed to work that fateful Sunday.

BLACK DIAMOND, Tuesday, Nov. 8—The question of proceeding with the work of endeavoring to rescue bodies of the fifteen men caught in the Lawson slope explosion on Sunday morning, is finally to be settled tonight at a meeting of state mining experts and leaders of the Black Diamond local of United Mine Workers, according to G.W. Mertens, superintendent of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, and secretary to J.C. Ford, president of the Pacific Coast Coal Company. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 12, 1922

bd-hotel-10-12-1922When it comes to Hospitality and Service (capital letters please, Mr. Printer), the Black Diamond Hotel is willing to stack its record against the best in the country. The reason for this is not hard to discover when one meets face to face the efficient staff shown herewith. (more…)

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