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Posts Tagged ‘Leary’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 31, 1884

Editor, Post-Intelligencer:

Your correspondent was yesterday placed under great obligations to Mr. J.L. Howard, general superintendent of the Oregon Improvement Company, by reason of an invitation, obtained through the kindness of Mayor Leary, to accompany himself, Mr. Leary and Mr. A.A. Denny over the new line of railroad stretching from our city toward the Green River coal fields, and known in common parlance as the Cedar River Extension. Mr. Denny was, to the regret of all, unable to attend.

The party was under the thoughtful care of Mr. T.J. Milner, the genial assistant superintendent of the Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, September 9, 1900

Want ten cents per car more

Outside or common laborers asked for a raise from S2.25 to $2.50 a day—coal mine owners declare that the property will lie idle if they cannot find men willing to work for the old wages

As a result of the denial of their demand for an increase of wages 150 miners in the employ of the Seattle-San Francisco Railway & Navigation Company, at Leary, this county, went out on a strike Friday. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 27, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

“We’ve lived in coal revivals since 1915. We have spurts and then, they fall off,” observed John Markus, Sr., proprietor of Ravensdale’s principal place of business, a grocery on the Kent-Kangley Road.

The little community with the euphonious name in South King County’s coal belt is about to have another “spurt,” however. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 19, 2016

By Bill Kombol

This Ravensdale school building was built in 1904, likely incorporating the old school as the front wing.

This Ravensdale school building was built in 1904, likely incorporating the old school as the front wing.

The Ravensdale school district was created in 1892. The first one-room school was constructed in 1893 housing 16 students, but was designed for 36. A local sawmill provided jobs, as school enrollment ebbed and flowed with mill employment. However, the area wasn’t yet known as Ravensdale, it was just called District #109. (more…)

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