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Posts Tagged ‘Lewis County’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 5, 1923

Black Diamond was saddened the past week by the accidental deaths of two of the men employed in the mine, Frank Eltz, inside laborer, who met his death on Wednesday, June 27, and Joe Spinks, inside laborer, who followed Eltz over the Divide two days later, Friday, June 29.

Eltz was 37 years of age, born in Austria, March 20, 1886. He came to the United States in 1913, and has been with the Pacific Coast Coal Company since August 1921. He was working in the gangway of the 12th level, north, at 5:30 p.m., when a large piece of rock fell from the roof, killing him instantly. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 30, 1940

The stubborn fire near Hobart, twenty-five miles east of Seattle, which is believed to have been set by a firebug early last week, burned on unabated last night over an area of almost 1,800 acres of cutover land while weary crews battled to keep it within present confines.

Immediately threatened are the huge stands of virgin timber near and on Seattle’s Cedar River watershed. The flames licked their way into this first-growth timber in several spots late yesterday and only by hard work were the crews able to check their spread. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 28, 1921

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

The purpose of this preliminary sketch is to give the readers of the Bulletin a general view of the coal fields of the state, this to be followed by more detailed articles covering each of the counties in which coal occurs in commercial quantities.

Near the northern boundary line of the state, on the northwest slope of Mt. Baker, there is a small area containing anthracite and anthracitic coal. So far no commercial mines have been developed within this field.

Westward and near the shore of Bellingham Bay, is an area containing a coal bed that is being developed by the Bellingham Mines Company. It is not known at present what the full extent of this area is, but it is probable that additional discoveries will be made in Whatcom County. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 31, 1922

Three chicken eaters: Waylie Hemphill, Gen. Sales Mgr., on left; A.F. Marion, Chief Engineer Pacific Coast Company, in center; and N.D. Moore, Vice-President, at far end, are here shown smiling in anticipation of that big chicken feed at Burnett, on Labor Day.

Three chicken eaters: Waylie Hemphill, Gen. Sales Mgr., on left; A.F. Marion, Chief Engineer Pacific Coast Company, in center; and N.D. Moore, Vice-President, at far end, are here shown smiling in anticipation of that big chicken feed at Burnett, on Labor Day.

We are all going to have a good time at Burnett on next Monday, when the Western Washington First Aid and Mine Rescue meet is to be held at that camp.

Burnett, apparently out to make a record in hospitality, has increased the list of sports to be given on that day, until about everything that could possibly go with such an outing has been included.

Games for everybody, old and young, large or small, chicken dinner, music, a grand ball, problems in relief and rescue for which picked teams have been training for weeks, special events calculated to keep the fun going all day, and most of the night, free ice cream and candies for the youngsters, races for cash prizes, special motion picture show, and contests designed to stir the mirth of the most sad—these are only a few of the good things down on the bill of fare.

The program, as amplified, includes at least a dozen sports not originally included, and will keep things moving at least until 1 a.m., when the Grand Ball, given at the hotel, will close. (more…)

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