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Posts Tagged ‘locomotives’

Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in Carbon River Heritage newsletter, July 1986

by Nancy Irene Hall

James L. Brummett, ex-Coast Guard officer-turned trapper, fisherman, and hunter. Jim posing with some of his furs on the dock of his Double Rainbow Lake Resort located just 2 miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnon exit. (Photo by Nancy Irene Hall.)

James L. Brummett, ex-Coast Guard officer-turned trapper, fisherman, and hunter. Jim posing with some of his furs on the dock of his Double Rainbow Lake Resort located just 2 miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnon exit. (Photo by Nancy Irene Hall.)

The site of the old coal mine town once called South Willis lies just a few miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnion exit. It is now the home of Double Rainbow Resort, a 25-acre resort run by James L. Brummett. This land has seen many changes since its coal mining days.

It was named after the Northern Pacific Railroad’s young geologist Bailey Willis, who did the coal explorations for their Northern Transcontinental Survey in 1881–1884. After his explorations he gave his account of the coal in the Wilkeson, South Willis, Carbonado area in a paper entitled “Report of the Coal Fields of Washington Territory.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Intelligencer, June 16, 1881

Early photo of Newcastle (near present day Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park) south of Bellevue.

Newcastle 1883

Newcastle, as most of our readers well know, is a coal mining town situated in the mountains, about twenty-two miles from Seattle.

The houses occupied by the miners are small, and as a general thing unpainted; and but little regularity exists in the location of buildings. When the mine was being opened, rude cabins were built wherever room between the stumps could be found, and they are still used, the miner paying a small rent each month for them. The houses built at a later date are much better and more convenient. The cottages occupied by the storekeeper, bookkeeper, superintendent, physician, and some other employees, are neat and comfortable. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Intelligencer, May 18, 1880

One of the most convincing proofs of the steady growth and prosperity of our territory is to be found in the development and increased capacity of our coal mines. And, for an example we will take one, near at hand—the Newcastle mine—situated near Lake Washington, in the central portion of our county to demonstrate this proposition. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 28, 1924

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

Briquet Plant data of interest to you

This plant was opened in 1914 and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that over one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

Camp welcomes you

Through Mrs. Julius Johnson, president Newcastle Circle of the Parent-Teacher Association, its membership numbering 51, joins with the entire camp and the company officials in welcoming the visiting P.T.A. members of King County today. We want you to see the mine and the camp of which we are so proud, and when you leave us, above all, we want you to remember your trip to Newcastle and that your return will be welcomed.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars.

First, will be seen the unloading hoppers through which the fresh coal will be flowing from the railroad cars. From here the coal goes to the top of the high timber structure known as the “Raw coal bunker.” Through this it is fed down by gravity and in the exact proportion required into the two steel box conveyors which run from this bunker into the steel building ahead, known as the “Dryer Building.”

Before leaving the raw coal bunker, by stepping up the first flight of steps may be seen the “measuring” conveyors which portion out the two grades of coal as the housewife measures the ingredients of a cake. (more…)

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Maple Valley Historical Society, March 1987

Here’s where me and the railroad got together.

My brother went up to Maple Valley for some reason or other and saw this gang of railroad men working to save the track that was being washed out. Being nosy, he went up to the foreman and asked if they were hiring anybody and he said yes, and get anyone else you can.

He came home and got me and we started work filling gunny sacks with sand at 4:00 p.m. and didn’t stop til 4:00 p.m. the next day. The rain never let up and gunny sacks got hard to get because everyone else needed them too for the same reason we did. We wound up using sacks that had been filled with rock salt and the salt cut our hands making them very sore. We didn’t have the little bags they use nowadays but the 100-pound size which we about two-thirds filled. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 23, 1894

Engineers at work and narrow gauge to be widened very soon

A party of engineers under A.A. Booth is in the field revising the line for the extension of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad to a connection with the Northern Pacific near Palmer, which is known as the Palmer Cut-Off, and it is understood that, while no official information on the subject can be obtained, the construction of the road will soon begin and be very soon followed by the widening of the Columbia & Puget Sound to standard gauge.

It is understood that this step has been hastened by the traffic connection between the Northern Pacific and the Burlington, the latter road wishing to save mileage and time in running trains to and from Seattle, its chosen Pacific Coast terminus, by avoiding the roundabout trap by way of Meeker. (more…)

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