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Posts Tagged ‘locomotives’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 3, 1925

This is Supt. Simon Ash’s fiery steed, Flyer. It and its fellows hauled the coal trips in the mines of Western Washington before electric haulage came in.

Engineer-fireman Norman Stevenson and conductor-brakeman-flagman-switchman Tom Dodd do, or would, take turns lifting her back on the track when, as, and if she hopped off, they’re that strong and determined.

The Flyer was cold for years until she was fired up recently for yard duty to take the place of a storage-battery locomotive that went inside on development work. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 2, 1925

Eyes steady in the face of danger
Resourceful, true, a man of soldier-worth
Who braves, for loved ones’ peace and comfort
The dark, deep-delving trenches of the earth. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, May 1997

By Colin McDonald

In January and February of 1938, Bill Iverson and I were hired by the Baldridge Logging Co. to fire their donkey which was located near the top of Taylor Mountain.

I told this to a person who didn’t know anything about logging. I said, “We had to get up early to steam up the donkey before the crew arrived.” He replied, “What did you do? Run him around in a corral?” He thought we were using a four-legged donkey. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in Carbon River Heritage newsletter, July 1986

by Nancy Irene Hall

James L. Brummett, ex-Coast Guard officer-turned trapper, fisherman, and hunter. Jim posing with some of his furs on the dock of his Double Rainbow Lake Resort located just 2 miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnon exit. (Photo by Nancy Irene Hall.)

James L. Brummett, ex-Coast Guard officer-turned trapper, fisherman, and hunter. Jim posing with some of his furs on the dock of his Double Rainbow Lake Resort located just 2 miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnon exit. (Photo by Nancy Irene Hall.)

The site of the old coal mine town once called South Willis lies just a few miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnion exit. It is now the home of Double Rainbow Resort, a 25-acre resort run by James L. Brummett. This land has seen many changes since its coal mining days.

It was named after the Northern Pacific Railroad’s young geologist Bailey Willis, who did the coal explorations for their Northern Transcontinental Survey in 1881–1884. After his explorations he gave his account of the coal in the Wilkeson, South Willis, Carbonado area in a paper entitled “Report of the Coal Fields of Washington Territory.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Intelligencer, June 16, 1881

Early photo of Newcastle (near present day Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park) south of Bellevue.

Newcastle 1883

Newcastle, as most of our readers well know, is a coal mining town situated in the mountains, about twenty-two miles from Seattle.

The houses occupied by the miners are small, and as a general thing unpainted; and but little regularity exists in the location of buildings. When the mine was being opened, rude cabins were built wherever room between the stumps could be found, and they are still used, the miner paying a small rent each month for them. The houses built at a later date are much better and more convenient. The cottages occupied by the storekeeper, bookkeeper, superintendent, physician, and some other employees, are neat and comfortable. (more…)

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