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Posts Tagged ‘lodges’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 27, 1925

These handsome gentlemen run the stores. From left to right, upper row, they are C.T. Paulson of Carbonado, H.W. Doust of Newcastle, Malcolm McPhee, purchasing agent; lower row, L.W. Foreman of Burnett, H.M. McDowell of Black Diamond, and E.F. De Grandpre, Manager of Miscellaneous Operations. This picture shows them working hard at a business meeting.

Mr. McPhee buys the goods, the store managers sell them, and Mr. De Grandpre gets all the money. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 25, 1925

Practically the entire populations of Newcastle, Burnett, Carbonado, Black Diamond, and Wilkeson joined in celebrating the first annual picnic given by the employees of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and allied companies at Fortuna Park last Sunday.

Music was plentifully dispensed throughout the day by the combined Newcastle and Black Diamond bands, numbering 40 pieces in all. Wilkeson, as special guests from the Wilkeson Coal Coke Co., came in more than 50 automobiles, each decorated with a distinctive sign. The ambulance was utilized as a supply wagon. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 29, 1971

By William A. Ziegner

Joe’s old Maple Valley General Store being moved (top) to make way for Serve-U’s expansion in 1959. And below, of course, the area as it looks today.

Joe’s old Maple Valley General Store being moved (top) to make way for Serve-U’s expansion in 1959. And below, of course, the area as it looks today.

Once in a while, the Voice gets around to what is called a personality sketch. It’s high time we came up with another one and past high time that we bang out a few words about the now 75-year-old civic leader, who has often been called (and still is) “the Mayor of Maple Valley.”

He’s Joe Mezzavilla, of course, who still makes his own wine, still keeps on the go every day, all day, and still has the same friendly smile and charm he had with this writer first met him in about 1952.

Joe at that time was proprietor of the old Sure-Fine Cash Store, occupying a frame building next to where the present Serve-U is located, at first about half today’s size. Joe waited on his customers himself most of the time. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 12, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Local bands would often play at dances, wedding, funerals, churches, and of course parades. Music and bands are just one aspect of the rich history of coal mining towns.

Local bands would often play at dances, wedding, funerals, churches, and of course parades. Music and bands are just one aspect of the rich history of coal mining towns.

This photo #116926 has “musicians in Ravensdale” written on the back and comes courtesy of the Black Diamond Historical Society. It probably dates to the early 1900s, but none of the band members have yet been identified.

In today’s world music is ubiquitous—you hear it on the radio, television, movies, elevators, in your car, on your iPod, wherever you go there’s music.

It wasn’t always so. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 14, 1922

New Pacific Coast Coal Co logo - 1927At a reasonably early hour on July 4, next, a special train bearing men, women and children wearing their holiday clothes will leave Seattle, and afterward Newcastle, for Black Diamond.

At about the same time, stages, similarly burdened with humans out to give dull care the gate, for a day at least, will start from Issaquah and Burnett, and probably Bayne, Carbonado and Wilkeson, for the same place. (more…)

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By JoAnne Matsumura

Ernest Moore was born in the coal-mining town of Franklin, Wash. "If there's any other job, you'd be better off taking that other job." (Greg Gilbert / Seattle Times)

Ernest Moore was born in the coal-mining town of Franklin, Wash. “If there’s any other job, you’d be better off taking that other job.” (Greg Gilbert / Seattle Times)

He was an owner of a coal mine, a pump man, and a mule skinner; he was a proficient shoeshine boy and a gracious porter; he picked moss and ferns and cut logs in the woods; and he served on a rescue team at the Gorge and as an Army quartermaster during World War II.

He once took a job in a foundry and another paving asphalt roads; he had two children and was a father figure to 30 more; he was an interesting storyteller—and he even wrote a book about it all.

He was Ernest “Ernie” Roy Moore, Sr., an African-American, third generation coal miner who was born in Franklin, Washington, on May 5, 1912. (more…)

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Originally published in Eastsideweek, November 24, 1993

By David B. Buerge

Black lung, long hours, and stinking low pay: While the coal-mining business boomed on the Eastside, the underground life was a bust

Coal Creek Mine

On a mid-August night in 1929, residents of Coal Creek, west of Issaquah, watched a red glow fill the northern sky. As the ruddy light shifted and flared, miners about to go down for the graveyard shift deep in the Primrose Mine wondered aloud if Kirkland might be on fire.

But the lift bringing them back out of the mine at 7:30 that morning was more than a mile away from the entrance they’d used the night before. It was then they realized that the fire was much closer than Kirkland. They had their first look at the smoking timbers of the Pacific Coast Coal Co.’s coal bunkers and washery, which had tumbled in a charred ruin on the railroad tracks to Seattle.

Their hearts sank. (more…)

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