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Posts Tagged ‘Maple Valley Historical Society’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 21, 1978

One of Maple Valley’s first stores, once well-stocked and standing where the Maple Valley Food Center is now located, still is used for storage as it rests in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place. Built about 1896, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

One of Maple Valley’s first stores, once well-stocked and standing where the Maple Valley Food Center is now located, still is used for storage as it rests in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place. Built about 1896, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

Maple Valley’s first store sits proudly in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place and it is almost unnoticed.

Built about 1896, owned and run successively by William D. Gibbon and Joe Mezzavilla, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley.

According to Jayne Wissel, King County historic site researcher, there are many unique structures of local historical significance in the Maple Valley area such as the Scholtman house, the Lagesson cabin, and the Hobart school buildings.

Local citizens and members of the Maple Valley Historical Society have aided in the locating and historical research of these sites. Some information has been gathered on many more sites. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Over the near century from 1885 to 1982, Maple Valley hosted three different railroad stations, all located in old Maple Valley just north of where Highway 18 overpasses SR-169. This photo of the third Maple Valley depot dates to 1953 shortly after it was built.

The Maple Valley station was an important cog for directing rail traffic as trains could be switched to Black Diamond, Taylor, or up the Cedar River through Landsburg into the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 4, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Proprietors Paul and Hannah Knoernschild, standing to the left of the horse and buggy, in the coal and clay mining town of Taylor.

Proprietors Paul and Hannah Knoernschild, standing to the left of the horse and buggy, in the coal and clay mining town of Taylor.

Taylor was a mining town located about 4 miles east of Hobart on a branch line of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. The area was first homesteaded by Sam Galloway, who discovered both coal and clay deposits in 1892.

Three years later the property was sold to Arthur Denny, who’d founded Seattle in 1852. He formed the Denny Clay Company, which opened the mines with the coal used to fire the clay manufactured into bricks, shingles, and sewer pipe. Over 633,000 tons of coal were mined and millions of clay products shipped. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 2009

By Barbara Nilson

The Louis Krall family celebrates their mother’s birthday in 1958 at the Kennydale home of Nancy and Don Krall. Back row: Larry, Don and Hank; front row: Ann, Mrs. (Emily) Louis Krall, mother; Emily and Marie. (Photo loaned by Krall family).

The Louis Krall family celebrates their mother’s birthday in 1958 at the Kennydale home of Nancy and Don Krall. Back row: Larry, Don and Hank; front row: Ann, Mrs. (Emily) Louis Krall, mother; Emily and Marie. (Photo loaned by Krall family).

[Saturday, April 18, 2009, the Louis Krall family shared memories of growing up on their farm established in 1911 on the Hobart-Taylor Road. The program was sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society. The presentation was given by Jeanette Dunn, daughter of Emily (Krall) and Ernest Costanzo, and extended family members including her uncles, Larry and Don Krall.]

Jeanette Dunn’s grandparents, Emily and Louis Krall, along with their first born, a daughter Marie, emigrated from what is now Slovakia in 1911. Marie was born in Austria/Hungry and was six months old when they took the USS Kaiser Wilhelm from Brennan, Germany to New York. They intended to join Louis’ brothers who were already in America and Canada. They came to Washington through Canada in 1911.

Louis was a miner and worked in local mines at Ravensdale, Landsburg, Taylor, and Franklin. The family lived in Taylor and Franklin for a short time before moving to Hobart. He later worked at the clay plant in Taylor as did several of his sons. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 26, 2016

By Bill Kombol

The administration building was considered for landmark status due to its historic significance, but the deterioration of the structure was too great for it to be saved.

The administration building was considered for landmark status due to its historic significance, but the deterioration of the structure was too great for it to be saved.

This administration building of Pacific Coast Coal Co. was constructed in 1927 to serve as a combination office and shop for New Black Diamond mine. A powerhouse was located in the east end of the building, which was located at 18825 State Route 169, about halfway between Maple Valley and Renton. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, January 25, 1923

Sylvia G. Webb appointed to postmastership here—office now being rushed to completion

The Maple Valley Historical Society’s W.D. Gibbon store and post office museum, 22024 SE 248th St, Maple Valley.

The Maple Valley Historical Society’s W.D. Gibbon store and post office museum, 22024 SE 248th St, Maple Valley.

Mrs. Sylvia G. Webb, who was recently appointed postmistress at Maplevalley, will take office about February 1, or as soon as the new post office is ready.

W.D. Gibbon resigned the postmastership last June after thirty-one years in the postal service, in order to devote more time to his business.

Call for civil service examinations tailed to meet with any response, with the result that the department was forced to make an appointment.

The new post office will be located next to Gibbon’s store and is now being rushed to completion. W.A. Burtenshaw is doing the general carpenter work.

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, date unknown [ca. 2000]

By Barbara Nilson

Featured at the April 16 Historical Society program in Hobart is the Carey family: five of the seven Carey children are shown about 1911 (oldest to youngest): Mae, “Boonie,” Bill, Florence and Helen. — Photo loaned by Tim Green, Mae’s grandson.

Featured at the April 16 Historical Society program in Hobart is the Carey family: five of the seven Carey children are shown about 1911 (oldest to youngest): Mae, “Boonie,” Bill, Florence and Helen. — Photo loaned by Tim Green, Mae’s grandson.

The third generation of Careys, Tim Green, will share his research into the Hobart family, Sunday, April 16, at 1:30 p.m. in the Hobart Community Church. The program is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society with Lois Bartholomew and Lois Clapper as co-hostesses.

Tim Green is the son of Virginia Sidebotham Green, whose mother was Mae Carey, the oldest of the seven Carey children. Virginia’s brother is George “Pokey” Sidebotham.

Green said his great grandparents, William and Catherine Carey, came to Seattle in 1902 from Michigan. Carey was involved in insurance and real estate in the Pioneer Square area.

Around 1908-10, he heard about the property in Hobart being for sale and acquired around 100 acres, which became known as the “Carey Ranch.” The Carey Creek still flows through the property. (more…)

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