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Posts Tagged ‘Maple Valley Historical Society’

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, July 1994

By Barbara Nilson
Based on taped interview by Bill McDermand in November 1993 and interview by Barbara and Edward Nilson in June 1994.

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

But the road to the outfield of the Boston Red Sox in the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals wasn’t easy.

He was born in Taylor in 1912 to Veronica and Michael Lazor (pronounced Lawser in the Valley but known as Laser like the beam in baseball circles) who had immigrated from Czechoslovakia. His folks met in New York in the 1890s and went to Franklin around 1908 for his Dad to work in the mines dumping cars. They then moved to Taylor where the first of four children were born.

The oldest was Mary, born in 1908, then Mike, 1910, and Johnny was next. In 1914 the family moved onto their 20-acre farm in Hobart and the youngest boy, Vincent was born.

His folks paid $10 an acre for the farm, which they sold in 1969 to the Bill McDermand family. It is located on the old road to Taylor (S.E. 208th St.) on the north side. When his folks moved here it had all been logged off, but huge stumps remained. Lazor said it took a box and a half of powder just to blow them open. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 1995

Vivian Mathison talked about her school days at the April 17th Hobart get-together sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Vivian Mathison talked about her school days at the April 17th Hobart get-together sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

My name is Vivian Mathison. I was Vivian Kelley when I lived in Hobart from 1930 to 1939. My family moved to Hobart from Kerriston on March 17, 1930.

Our family consisted of our parents, Will and Maude Kelley, Lois, Vera, Grace, and me. Also Mike, our black and white Spitz dog given to us by the Higgins family when they moved away.

I was 10 years old when we moved to Hobart and I entered Miss Bock’s 4th grade. My special friend right away was Vivian Peterson. We were the two Vivs, and remained best friends all through school, attending Tahoma and graduating in 1938.

From my point of remembrance our family’s special friends were the W.D. Thompsons, the Lonnie Triggs, Norma Purdy, Vivian Peterson, Dave Conard, and Gerald Bartholomew. My sister Lois and Gerald, and Dave and I enjoyed going to the dances at Lake Wilderness. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 21, 1978

One of Maple Valley’s first stores, once well-stocked and standing where the Maple Valley Food Center is now located, still is used for storage as it rests in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place. Built about 1896, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

One of Maple Valley’s first stores, once well-stocked and standing where the Maple Valley Food Center is now located, still is used for storage as it rests in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place. Built about 1896, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

Maple Valley’s first store sits proudly in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place and it is almost unnoticed.

Built about 1896, owned and run successively by William D. Gibbon and Joe Mezzavilla, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley.

According to Jayne Wissel, King County historic site researcher, there are many unique structures of local historical significance in the Maple Valley area such as the Scholtman house, the Lagesson cabin, and the Hobart school buildings.

Local citizens and members of the Maple Valley Historical Society have aided in the locating and historical research of these sites. Some information has been gathered on many more sites. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Over the near century from 1885 to 1982, Maple Valley hosted three different railroad stations, all located in old Maple Valley just north of where Highway 18 overpasses SR-169. This photo of the third Maple Valley depot dates to 1953 shortly after it was built.

The Maple Valley station was an important cog for directing rail traffic as trains could be switched to Black Diamond, Taylor, or up the Cedar River through Landsburg into the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 4, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Proprietors Paul and Hannah Knoernschild, standing to the left of the horse and buggy, in the coal and clay mining town of Taylor.

Proprietors Paul and Hannah Knoernschild, standing to the left of the horse and buggy, in the coal and clay mining town of Taylor.

Taylor was a mining town located about 4 miles east of Hobart on a branch line of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. The area was first homesteaded by Sam Galloway, who discovered both coal and clay deposits in 1892.

Three years later the property was sold to Arthur Denny, who’d founded Seattle in 1852. He formed the Denny Clay Company, which opened the mines with the coal used to fire the clay manufactured into bricks, shingles, and sewer pipe. Over 633,000 tons of coal were mined and millions of clay products shipped. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 2009

By Barbara Nilson

The Louis Krall family celebrates their mother’s birthday in 1958 at the Kennydale home of Nancy and Don Krall. Back row: Larry, Don and Hank; front row: Ann, Mrs. (Emily) Louis Krall, mother; Emily and Marie. (Photo loaned by Krall family).

The Louis Krall family celebrates their mother’s birthday in 1958 at the Kennydale home of Nancy and Don Krall. Back row: Larry, Don and Hank; front row: Ann, Mrs. (Emily) Louis Krall, mother; Emily and Marie. (Photo loaned by Krall family).

[Saturday, April 18, 2009, the Louis Krall family shared memories of growing up on their farm established in 1911 on the Hobart-Taylor Road. The program was sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society. The presentation was given by Jeanette Dunn, daughter of Emily (Krall) and Ernest Costanzo, and extended family members including her uncles, Larry and Don Krall.]

Jeanette Dunn’s grandparents, Emily and Louis Krall, along with their first born, a daughter Marie, emigrated from what is now Slovakia in 1911. Marie was born in Austria/Hungry and was six months old when they took the USS Kaiser Wilhelm from Brennan, Germany to New York. They intended to join Louis’ brothers who were already in America and Canada. They came to Washington through Canada in 1911.

Louis was a miner and worked in local mines at Ravensdale, Landsburg, Taylor, and Franklin. The family lived in Taylor and Franklin for a short time before moving to Hobart. He later worked at the clay plant in Taylor as did several of his sons. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 26, 2016

By Bill Kombol

The administration building was considered for landmark status due to its historic significance, but the deterioration of the structure was too great for it to be saved.

The administration building was considered for landmark status due to its historic significance, but the deterioration of the structure was too great for it to be saved.

This administration building of Pacific Coast Coal Co. was constructed in 1927 to serve as a combination office and shop for New Black Diamond mine. A powerhouse was located in the east end of the building, which was located at 18825 State Route 169, about halfway between Maple Valley and Renton. (more…)

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