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Posts Tagged ‘Maple Valley Historical Society’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 23, 1978

Hard at work on the mini-park to-be near the Reader Board in central Maple Valley are these two members of the Plant and Wish Garden Club, left to right, Betty Sahlin and Helen Cook. Several community groups have offered their help—manually and financially—and more such aid is needed before the park can blossom.

Hard at work on the mini-park to-be near the Reader Board in central Maple Valley are these two members of the Plant and Wish Garden Club, left to right, Betty Sahlin and Helen Cook. Several community groups have offered their help—manually and financially—and more such aid is needed before the park can blossom.

A mini-park right in “downtown” Maple Valley, so to speak, is the current goal of three community organizations—the Maple Valley Lions’ Club, the Plant and Wish Garden Club, and the Maple Valley Historical Society.

The Lions are interested in bringing their bus shelter and reader board project to a close. About 25 more hours of work are needed, reports Johnny Markus of Ravensdale, to place a roof over the reader board to protect the lighting, build storage space for the reader board letters, do some remaining concrete work, and wire in the lights.

The historical group is eyeing the abandoned residence on the site, owned by Burlington Railroad. It would make an ideal place, members believe, for a museum.

The garden club is hard at work developing the mini-park itself on the triangular lot between the Maple Valley-Hobart Road and Highway 169.

Already plastic and chips have been laid on a section of the park and the ground smoothed for more plastic and chips. Robert Sloboden, James Daoust, Robert Smith, and Joe Wicks helped their garden club wives with this phase of the work.

The Slobodens’ sons also assisted. The gardeners especially thank Joe Wicks for the use of his back-hoe, the county for the chips, and those who started the mini-park ball rolling with monetary contributions.

The latter includes, so far, Gordon Gaub of the Maple Valley Food Center ($20) and the Maple Valley Lions Club ($50).

The garden club ladies are asking for more donations and are planning on planting trees and shrubs as soon as the weather permits.

The whole community is welcome to participate in the project.

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Originally published in Hobart Recollections, 1988

By Colin McDonald

Did you know that where the Hobart Fire Station now stands there was once a swamp?

In about 1931 (give or take a year) there was a swamp, starting at the corner of the Hobart and Taylor roads. It ran on about a 40- or 45-degree angle east, up close to where the old gym used to be.

The fill was made in a very unusual way, by today’s standards. In those days there was not a dump truck and bulldozer sitting on every corner. Mr. Bill Peacock, with his two horses, wagon, and Fresno scraper did the job over several months, hauling a yard to a yard and a half in each load. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS The Bugle, October 1994

The Lazor “children” out by the barn at the family farm on 208th. Seated are John and Mike Lazar and Mary Pilat. At back is Betty Lazor, Vince’s widow.

The Lazor “children” out by the barn at the family farm on 208th. Seated are John and Mike Lazar and Mary Pilat. At back is Betty Lazor, Vince’s widow.

Memories of the “old days” were flying fast on September 11 as generations of the Michael and Veronica Lazor family gathered with friends and neighbors at the former family farm on 208th Street.

The present owners, Paul and Gayle Kness, who purchased the farm in 1981, graciously welcomed some 40 Lazor descendants and former neighbors such as the Kralls and Junevitches for the reunion.

The three oldest Lazor children, Mary, Mike, and Johnny, were all present at the reunion. They were born in Taylor in the early 1900s. In 1914 they moved into the house their folks built on the 20-acre farm, where the youngest child, Vincent, was born. The farm was first sold in 1969 to the McDermand family. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 27, 1978

The Hobart gym, abandoned for years and still with windows boarded and needing paint, was used successfully last season for numerous volleyball games. It now appears it may be possible it may be possible through block grants funds to restore the building and make it once again a social center for the community as it was in earlier days.

The Hobart gym, abandoned for years and still with windows boarded and needing paint, was used successfully last season for numerous volleyball games. It now appears it may be possible it may be possible through block grants funds to restore the building and make it once again a social center for the community as it was in earlier days.

The Maple Valley Historical Society at its Sept. 18 meeting discussed three possible buildings or sites in the area which might qualify for inclusion in the State Historical Register or for block grant restoration money.

The gymnasium at the old Hobart School site was deemed the most historically significant building in that area by Jane Wissel, King County Historic Site researcher. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, July 1994

By Barbara Nilson
Based on taped interview by Bill McDermand in November 1993 and interview by Barbara and Edward Nilson in June 1994.

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

But the road to the outfield of the Boston Red Sox in the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals wasn’t easy.

He was born in Taylor in 1912 to Veronica and Michael Lazor (pronounced Lawser in the Valley but known as Laser like the beam in baseball circles) who had immigrated from Czechoslovakia. His folks met in New York in the 1890s and went to Franklin around 1908 for his Dad to work in the mines dumping cars. They then moved to Taylor where the first of four children were born.

The oldest was Mary, born in 1908, then Mike, 1910, and Johnny was next. In 1914 the family moved onto their 20-acre farm in Hobart and the youngest boy, Vincent was born.

His folks paid $10 an acre for the farm, which they sold in 1969 to the Bill McDermand family. It is located on the old road to Taylor (S.E. 208th St.) on the north side. When his folks moved here it had all been logged off, but huge stumps remained. Lazor said it took a box and a half of powder just to blow them open. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 1995

Vivian Mathison talked about her school days at the April 17th Hobart get-together sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Vivian Mathison talked about her school days at the April 17th Hobart get-together sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

My name is Vivian Mathison. I was Vivian Kelley when I lived in Hobart from 1930 to 1939. My family moved to Hobart from Kerriston on March 17, 1930.

Our family consisted of our parents, Will and Maude Kelley, Lois, Vera, Grace, and me. Also Mike, our black and white Spitz dog given to us by the Higgins family when they moved away.

I was 10 years old when we moved to Hobart and I entered Miss Bock’s 4th grade. My special friend right away was Vivian Peterson. We were the two Vivs, and remained best friends all through school, attending Tahoma and graduating in 1938.

From my point of remembrance our family’s special friends were the W.D. Thompsons, the Lonnie Triggs, Norma Purdy, Vivian Peterson, Dave Conard, and Gerald Bartholomew. My sister Lois and Gerald, and Dave and I enjoyed going to the dances at Lake Wilderness. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 21, 1978

One of Maple Valley’s first stores, once well-stocked and standing where the Maple Valley Food Center is now located, still is used for storage as it rests in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place. Built about 1896, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

One of Maple Valley’s first stores, once well-stocked and standing where the Maple Valley Food Center is now located, still is used for storage as it rests in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place. Built about 1896, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley. —Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

Maple Valley’s first store sits proudly in a pasture at the dead end of S.E. 216th Place and it is almost unnoticed.

Built about 1896, owned and run successively by William D. Gibbon and Joe Mezzavilla, it is probably the oldest commercial building remaining in Maple Valley.

According to Jayne Wissel, King County historic site researcher, there are many unique structures of local historical significance in the Maple Valley area such as the Scholtman house, the Lagesson cabin, and the Hobart school buildings.

Local citizens and members of the Maple Valley Historical Society have aided in the locating and historical research of these sites. Some information has been gathered on many more sites. (more…)

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