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Posts Tagged ‘Maple Valley Historical Society’

Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS newsletter, The Bugle, October 1991

(Some of the old-timers of Maple Valley have been asked to write down recollections of earlier days. Most of what I recall is family history and there are times I cannot trust my memory. Also, much of it reflects a child’s point of view. Even my sister Ruth and I have entirely different recollections.)Inez (Williams) Merritt

1927 Tahoma High School. Inez Williams is in the second row, fourteenth from the left. (Courtesy Maple Valley Historical Society.)

1927 Tahoma High School. Inez Williams is in the second row, fourteenth from the left. (Courtesy Maple Valley Historical Society.)

My father, Roger Williams, became disabled in the summer of 1925 with what was diagnosed as inflammatory rheumatism. He was staying with relatives in Renton and mother had to cope with running the farm and an infant daughter born April 8th (Ruth).

Jean was 15 years old and I was 10 years old. We were able to do the everyday chores but the haying was beyond our capabilities.

One warm day in July, a parade of teams (horses) and wagons of all sizes and description came through the front gate and up to the barn.

These were neighbors who cheerfully gave up a day’s work on their own farms to give us a hand. There was even a team of mules among the others. It is the hardest job anyone would want to do and the hot, dry days of summer make it even worse. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, October 1994

Eva Litras fondly tells that five generations of her family have grown up in the Selleck area.

Eva Litras fondly tells that five generations of her family have grown up in the Selleck area.

A “love affair” with Selleck was evident at the reunion September 18 at the old grade school. Amandus Carlyle Butcher summed up the emotional attachment to the old sawmill town: “I love this country.”

Butcher went to all the first eight grades in Selleck and said it was the best place in the world to grow up.

His dad built the Kangley tavern in 1927 and ran it until 1932 while working days at the sawmill. Butcher hasn’t moved very far away, residing in Maple Valley. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, October 1993

By Barbara Nilson

Gathered on the front porch of the former Olson mansion on September 20 are Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and his wife, Cleo, at far right. In the back row are Ted’s nephews Jim Oien, Issaquah, and Keith Oien, Enumclaw, sons of Adeline Olson Oien; at back right is Vincent Olson, of Bothell, son of Ted. In front of Vincent is Ted’s daughter, Maureen Olson Engbert, of Seattle. In the front row are three nieces and a daughter; Jarine Olson Freeman, Seattle, Ivor’s daughter; Shirley Olson Patterson, Carnation, Olaf’s daughter; Shari Olson Lawrence, Woodinville, Ted’s daughter, and Virginia Oien Phelan, Seattle, Olga’s daughter. —Photo by Barbara Nilson

Gathered on the front porch of the former Olson mansion on September 20 are Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and his wife, Cleo, at far right. In the back row are Ted’s nephews Jim Oien, Issaquah, and Keith Oien, Enumclaw, sons of Adeline Olson Oien; at back right is Vincent Olson, of Bothell, son of Ted. In front of Vincent is Ted’s daughter, Maureen Olson Engbert, of Seattle. In the front row are three nieces and a daughter; Jarine Olson Freeman, Seattle, Ivor’s daughter; Shirley Olson Patterson, Carnation, Olaf’s daughter; Shari Olson Lawrence, Woodinville, Ted’s daughter, and Virginia Oien Phelan, Seattle, Olga’s daughter. —Photo by Barbara Nilson

Sunday dinners and holidays were some of the special times at the Olson mansion on 216th, recalled Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and some of his nephews and nieces as they gathered at the mansion on September 20th for the historical society’s monthly program.

Eight Olson children, five boys and three girls, grew up in the home built about 1905. Roosevelt, known as Teddy, is the only son still living. Two daughters, Mrs. Adeline Oien of Kent, and Mrs. Anne Thompson, Seattle, are also still living. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 23, 1978

Hard at work on the mini-park to-be near the Reader Board in central Maple Valley are these two members of the Plant and Wish Garden Club, left to right, Betty Sahlin and Helen Cook. Several community groups have offered their help—manually and financially—and more such aid is needed before the park can blossom.

Hard at work on the mini-park to-be near the Reader Board in central Maple Valley are these two members of the Plant and Wish Garden Club, left to right, Betty Sahlin and Helen Cook. Several community groups have offered their help—manually and financially—and more such aid is needed before the park can blossom.

A mini-park right in “downtown” Maple Valley, so to speak, is the current goal of three community organizations—the Maple Valley Lions’ Club, the Plant and Wish Garden Club, and the Maple Valley Historical Society.

The Lions are interested in bringing their bus shelter and reader board project to a close. About 25 more hours of work are needed, reports Johnny Markus of Ravensdale, to place a roof over the reader board to protect the lighting, build storage space for the reader board letters, do some remaining concrete work, and wire in the lights.

The historical group is eyeing the abandoned residence on the site, owned by Burlington Railroad. It would make an ideal place, members believe, for a museum.

The garden club is hard at work developing the mini-park itself on the triangular lot between the Maple Valley-Hobart Road and Highway 169.

Already plastic and chips have been laid on a section of the park and the ground smoothed for more plastic and chips. Robert Sloboden, James Daoust, Robert Smith, and Joe Wicks helped their garden club wives with this phase of the work.

The Slobodens’ sons also assisted. The gardeners especially thank Joe Wicks for the use of his back-hoe, the county for the chips, and those who started the mini-park ball rolling with monetary contributions.

The latter includes, so far, Gordon Gaub of the Maple Valley Food Center ($20) and the Maple Valley Lions Club ($50).

The garden club ladies are asking for more donations and are planning on planting trees and shrubs as soon as the weather permits.

The whole community is welcome to participate in the project.

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Originally published in Hobart Recollections, 1988

By Colin McDonald

Did you know that where the Hobart Fire Station now stands there was once a swamp?

In about 1931 (give or take a year) there was a swamp, starting at the corner of the Hobart and Taylor roads. It ran on about a 40- or 45-degree angle east, up close to where the old gym used to be.

The fill was made in a very unusual way, by today’s standards. In those days there was not a dump truck and bulldozer sitting on every corner. Mr. Bill Peacock, with his two horses, wagon, and Fresno scraper did the job over several months, hauling a yard to a yard and a half in each load. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS The Bugle, October 1994

The Lazor “children” out by the barn at the family farm on 208th. Seated are John and Mike Lazar and Mary Pilat. At back is Betty Lazor, Vince’s widow.

The Lazor “children” out by the barn at the family farm on 208th. Seated are John and Mike Lazar and Mary Pilat. At back is Betty Lazor, Vince’s widow.

Memories of the “old days” were flying fast on September 11 as generations of the Michael and Veronica Lazor family gathered with friends and neighbors at the former family farm on 208th Street.

The present owners, Paul and Gayle Kness, who purchased the farm in 1981, graciously welcomed some 40 Lazor descendants and former neighbors such as the Kralls and Junevitches for the reunion.

The three oldest Lazor children, Mary, Mike, and Johnny, were all present at the reunion. They were born in Taylor in the early 1900s. In 1914 they moved into the house their folks built on the 20-acre farm, where the youngest child, Vincent, was born. The farm was first sold in 1969 to the McDermand family. (more…)

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