Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Masonic Hall’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 11, 2003

By Kathleen E. Kear

Left to right: Conrad “Coke” Roberts (Class of ’41) and Joe Zumek (Class of ’43) look forward to meeting up with classmates they have not seen in many years as well as meeting other Black Diamond High School graduates for the first time.

Little did they know that when 36 students entered first grade in September 1931, the graduating class of 1943 would be the last class to graduate from Black Diamond High School. In honor of the Class of 1943 as well as commemorating the closing of the high school, over 70 Black Diamond graduates from its various graduating classes will be gathering once again to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the last class to graduate from Black Diamond High School.

Schoolmates from as far away as Las Vegas, California, Idaho, and Oregon will be making the trip to reminisce of days gone by. Two of those in attendance (both from the class of 1926) will include Ruby (Favro) Keeney, 96, of Enumclaw, and Ernesta (Franchini) Van der Heyden, 96, from a rest home in Lake Forest. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 27, 1926

Miss Velma Hull demonstrates the Simpson Signaling Life Line, invented by Homer Blair and used for the first time at the Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet in Burnett last Saturday. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 20, 1926

One of Black Diamond’s finest assets is its splendid high school with the fine student body pictured in the group shown above. In athletics, dramatics, and all school activities, there is a wonderful school spirit which largely accounts for the creditable showing made by Black Diamond High.

In addition, the high school is interested in First Aid training and has two teams which will compete in the annual Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet at Burnett next Saturday. Prof. Albert Weatherbee is the principal of the school. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 13, 1926

Scenes in the Garden of Eden could not have been more attractive than are the orchards of Wenatchee and Eastern Washington each spring when the apple trees are in full blossom. Against a background of jagged, snow-capped peaks, and nestled in the soft green of verdant clover and alfalfa, the exquisite beauty of the pale pink and white blossoms is beyond compare.

Until recently the orchardist was helpless against the blighting touch of late spring frosts, but thanks to the introduction of Diamond Briquets he is now able to protect his blossoming trees by heating his orchard. The picture shows a typical scene in the Wenatchee Valley. (Photo copyright by J.D. Wheeler.) (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 15, 1926

One of the institutions in Carbonado of which the camp is justly proud is the splendid Union Sunday School which recently passed the 100 mark in its membership. Mrs. J.W.L. Kaufman is the efficient superintendent of the Sunday School. She is assisted by a loyal corps of teachers and officers, all of whom are striving to make the organization even greater and better than it now is.

The Sunday School is undenominational, and it is unique in that all denominations and creeds represented are working in perfect harmony for the upbuilding of the religious and moral life of the community. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 10, 2015

By Kathleen Kear

Black Diamond resident Joe Androsko (right) took former Fire Chief Keith Timm (left) for a joy ride down memory lane in the Black Diamond Fire Department’s first fire engine—a 1947 Ford Howard-Cooper (rededicated in July 2014 during Miners Day)—to Black Diamond’s fire station. Photo by Kevin Esping.

What could be more fun than warm sunny weather in January? How about a ride in one of Black Diamond’s first fire engines, a 1947 Ford Howard-Cooper, with former Black Diamond Fire Chief Keith B. Timm?

Several weeks ago, Joe Androsko, Black Diamond resident and project manager of the 1947 Ford Howard-Cooper fire engine restoration project, went to pick up former Black Diamond Fire Chief Keith Timm and thereafter went for a joy ride down memory lane in the engine. Although Timm served as a Black Diamond firefighter from 1948-1976 before the engine came to town, he remembered fires being fought with a hose cart that had to be pulled around from one fire to another. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 4, 1926

Every day from 450 to 500 tons of Diamond Briquets are loaded into railroad cars for shipment to almost every point where fuel is used between Canada and Mexico on the Pacific Coast. This scene shows how the briquets are lowered from the cooling conveyor into the cars. Thousands of tons of Diamond Briquets will soon be distributed throughout the orchards of Eastern Washington, where they will be burned to protect the fruit blossoms from the ravages of frost this spring. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 12, 1925

During the summer months H.H. Boyd, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s agency in Wenatchee, prepared for a big season this winter. He had the storage bins of the Wenatchee yard remodeled to permit a quicker and more economical handling of the coal. This view is from the east side, showing how the railroad cars are unloaded. Trucks can drive directly over the tracks and into the bins. Mr. Boyd is a popular citizen of Wenatchee, prominent in lodge and civic affairs. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 15, 1925

Prize livestock and big pumpkins were not the only attractions at the recent State Fair held at Yakima, as the booth pictured herewith will attest. John Ryczek, resident agent for the Pacific Coast Coal Company in Yakima, writes the Bulletin that the Diamond Briquets and the peaches, both varieties, attracted wide attention.

Over the picture of the alluring young ladies at the left, the sign reads. “These Peaches will not freeze, they use Diamond Briquets,” while at the right above the plates of fruit is the inscription, “These Peaches did not freeze, they used Diamond Briquets.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 1, 1925

Judges at the Southeastern Alaska Fair, held at Juneau, September 15 to 19, decided that the booth of the Pacific Coast Coal Company was entitled to first prize among the strictly merchant displays, and second prize out of all the exhibits at the fair. While the picture cannot reproduce the full attractiveness of the booth, it nevertheless shows that H.G. Walmsley, the Juneau manager for the Pacific Coast Coal Company, is an artist in combining an effective display of black and white. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »