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Posts Tagged ‘May Creek’

Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 29, 1923

Mouth of the drift entrance to the Superior Mine located west of Issaquah near Tibbetts Creek, circa 1911-1912. The mine properties were subsequently purchased by Pacific Coast Coal Co.

Mouth of the drift entrance to the Superior Mine located west of Issaquah near Tibbetts Creek, circa 1911-1912. The mine properties were subsequently purchased by Pacific Coast Coal Co.

Before a special meeting of the Mine Council at Issaquah Wednesday, March 21, announcement was made of the company’s decision to temporarily suspend operations at Issaquah Mine. Plans were also outlined for the keeping intact of the Issaquah organization, so that when the mine reopens later in the summer, practically the entire crew may be available.

Following the council session, the council adjourned to the lobby of the hotel where all employees had been invited to an open meeting, and there the situation was explained to the camp as a whole. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 27, 1964

By Lucile McDonald

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

From high places around Hobart, where Bill Peacock has spent 77 of his nearly 80 years, he can view the new sweep of the Echo Lake cutoff highway and automobiles traveling along it at a fast clip.

The final section penetrates foothill country that not too long ago had only roads made with pick, shovel and wheelbarrow.

Peacock used to travel a long circuit over them once a week making meat deliveries. He believes he was the first person to drive a team and wagon into some of the communities along the Pacific Coast Railroad. The branch line later was torn up and the towns are now defunct. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 13, 1988

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Seattle Times Eastside bureau

One of the Newcastle coal-mine rescue teams in 1924 included, from left, B.F. Snook (the captain), George Hasku, Walter Clark, Joe Ansberger and George Munson.

One of the Newcastle coal-mine rescue teams in 1924 included, from left, B.F. Snook (the captain), George Hasku, Walter Clark, Joe Ansberger and George Munson.

It was an economic boom that lasted for more than 50 years—one that helped put Seattle and the Eastside on the map.

And it was a force that almost overnight turned this part of the Pacific Northwest into an ethnic melting pot.

Described in newspapers of the day, it was called “coal rush” and “coal fever.”

Coal. Black diamonds. Black gold. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 25, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

Pacific Coast Coal Co. Logo 1922The articles written thus far describing the coal fields of the State of Washington have dealt with fields which, with the exception of the Bellingham coal mines in Whatcom County, do not contain coal mines of very great commercial importance.

King County, next in order of discussion, is one of the three important bituminous coal areas of the state, the other two being Pierce and Kittitas counties. King County contains coal areas of such importance that it will be advisable to divide them under subdivisions, as follows:

Newcastle–Issaquah–Grand Ridge area; Cedar River area; Raging River–Upper Cedar River area; Ravensdale–Black Diamond area; Pacosco–Hyde area; Kummer–Krain area; National–Navy area; Bayne–Pocahontas area; Durham–Kangley area.

By subdividing the field into the above groups, the geological structure of the fields and the types of coal contained in them can be handled to best advantage. (more…)

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Originally published in the Issaquah Press, October 26, 1988

By Linda Thielke

Newcastle pioneer descendent Oliver Rouse, left, helps King County Executive Tim Hill establish a new historical marker for Thomas Rouse Road. Photo by Linda Thielke.

Newcastle pioneer descendent Oliver Rouse, left, helps King County Executive Tim Hill establish a new historical marker for Thomas Rouse Road. Photo by Linda Thielke.

Newcastle was one of the first big communities in 19th-century King County, so it was only fitting that modern-day county leaders should inaugurate a new historic sites marker program on the location of the now-gone town.

County officials and descendents of Newcastle mining families gathered on Cougar Mountain October 21 to designate three historic landmarks. The county was represented by County Executive Tim Hill, Councilman Bruce Laing and members of the Landmarks Commission. History was well-represented by such families as the Rouses, Swansons, and Baimas.

“This might not mean a damn thing to most people, but it does to us old-timers,” said one person in the crowd. (more…)

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