Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘McKay’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 7, 1984

Coal mining plan faces opposition

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Times suburban reporter

Bill Kombol, manager of Palmer Coking Coal Co. in Black Diamond, stands amid a stand of Douglas fir trees on reclaimed land that was part of the McKay Surface Mine in 1974-1976. The pit mine was dug as deep as 40 feet in some places to reach coal. Richard S. Hevza/Seattle Times

Douglas firs ranging from a foot to 10 feet high grow branchtip to branchtip along two narrow strips of generally clear land near Black Diamond.

A few short years ago these same corridors, hewn out of second- and third-growth forest, were sliced open to extract black diamonds—coal. The open ugly sores were the Palmer Coking Coal Company’s McKay and Gem Surface Mines. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 11, 1984

by Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

What should to be done with 11 acres of King County-owned land in the center of Black Diamond?

A recently completed study done for the King County Housing Authority recommends phased development of the site with single-family, owner-occupied homes and rental apartments for moderate- to low-income elderly persons.

The Housing Authority presented its recommendations to residents during a public meeting last night at the Black Diamond Elementary School. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 4, 2002

By Barbara Nilson

The Tahoma baseball team of 1940 was largely made up of Ravensdale residents. They are: (front row) Gino Tedesco, Frank Primozich, Bob Lang, Gene Collins, Wally Habenicht, unknown, and Larry Krall; (second row) Otto Moore, coach; Frank Pooleskie and Louie Wallace; (back row) Frank Pichinini, Walt Olsen, Charles Fore, Kal Tantari, Bill Sweeney, Ed Kuhuski, and Tommy Lee — Photo compliments of the Maple Valley Historical Society

Memories will be flying fast and furious, Sunday, Sept. 15, as folks gather for the annual Ravensdale Reunion, 1 p.m., at the Maple Valley Community Center, corner of Witte Road S.E. and S.E. 248th St. The reunion is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

No program is planned for the afternoon, just a chance to get-together over a cup of coffee and visit, share introductions and a tale or two over the open mic. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 24, 1913

Blast in Black Diamond Mine, of unknown origin, kills workman—his fellows in serious condition

Violation of rules suspected as cause: Required precautions observed by Pacific Coast Co., exposed lamp or match thought to blame

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

Jack Jackson was killed and Ned Rossi and Eugene Pelline, miners, were seriously burned in an explosion this morning on the tenth level of No. 14 mine at Black Diamond. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Washington State Historical Society’s quarterly journal, Columbia, Spring 1994

By John Hanscom

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Bird’s-eye-view map of Franklin Mine and its environs, c. 1890. (Courtesy of Don Mason and the Black Diamond Historical Society.)

Henry Villard launched the Oregon Improvement Company in October 1880 as part of his grand scheme to dominate the development of the Pacific Northwest. By 1883 he had tied the area to the national economy with the completion of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Expansive development of the Pacific Northwest seemed assured.

To fuel Villard’s steamships and locomotives, a dependable coal supply was a high priority. By February 1881 the Oregon Improvement Company had acquired the Seattle Coal and Transportation Company, including the Newcastle Mine east of Lake Washington, at a cost of one million dollars. The Seattle and Walla Walla Railroad (renamed the Columbia and Puget Sound) was also purchased for over half a million dollars to transport coal from mine to Seattle bunkers. Villard hired John L. Howard under a five-year contract at $10,000 per year as general manager of the coal business. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 14, 1924

State Mine Inspector W.R. Reese, a veteran in the coal industry of the State of Washington and recognized as one of the leading authorities on coal mining, has been made an honorary member of the Joseph A. Holmes Safety Associations at the various camps of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Mr. Reese takes a keen interest in safety work and is constantly striving to see that the hazards of mining are reduced to the minimum.

Many years ago he was a superintendent in the Pacific Coast Coal Company, and prior to becoming state mine inspector was connected with the Northwestern Improvement Company for many years. Few know the mines of this state better than W.R. Reese. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »