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Posts Tagged ‘McKay’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 24, 1913

Blast in Black Diamond Mine, of unknown origin, kills workman—his fellows in serious condition

Violation of rules suspected as cause: Required precautions observed by Pacific Coast Co., exposed lamp or match thought to blame

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

Jack Jackson was killed and Ned Rossi and Eugene Pelline, miners, were seriously burned in an explosion this morning on the tenth level of No. 14 mine at Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Washington State Historical Society’s quarterly journal, Columbia, Spring 1994

By John Hanscom

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Bird’s-eye-view map of Franklin Mine and its environs, c. 1890. (Courtesy of Don Mason and the Black Diamond Historical Society.)

Henry Villard launched the Oregon Improvement Company in October 1880 as part of his grand scheme to dominate the development of the Pacific Northwest. By 1883 he had tied the area to the national economy with the completion of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Expansive development of the Pacific Northwest seemed assured.

To fuel Villard’s steamships and locomotives, a dependable coal supply was a high priority. By February 1881 the Oregon Improvement Company had acquired the Seattle Coal and Transportation Company, including the Newcastle Mine east of Lake Washington, at a cost of one million dollars. The Seattle and Walla Walla Railroad (renamed the Columbia and Puget Sound) was also purchased for over half a million dollars to transport coal from mine to Seattle bunkers. Villard hired John L. Howard under a five-year contract at $10,000 per year as general manager of the coal business. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 14, 1924

State Mine Inspector W.R. Reese, a veteran in the coal industry of the State of Washington and recognized as one of the leading authorities on coal mining, has been made an honorary member of the Joseph A. Holmes Safety Associations at the various camps of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Mr. Reese takes a keen interest in safety work and is constantly striving to see that the hazards of mining are reduced to the minimum.

Many years ago he was a superintendent in the Pacific Coast Coal Company, and prior to becoming state mine inspector was connected with the Northwestern Improvement Company for many years. Few know the mines of this state better than W.R. Reese. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 5, 1977

By Vince O’Keefe

Sam Abbey, 1924

Sam Abbey, 1924

The sepia-tinted photograph was 50 years old but several faces were recognized instantly—Armand Galvagno, Elmer Favro, Joe Hosko, Benny Marino, Johnny Torlai, Jerry Remolif. These were some of the Georgetown Merchants, Seattle Soccer League champions for that particular year.

There were other remembered “mugs” in the yellowed pictures and crumbling clippings—Louie Pennacchi, Jim McMillan, Benny McPhillips, Henry Tessandore, Les Lapsansky, Tom Werner, Howie Baldwin, Chink Woehrie, Tex Michel

That’s the way it was at the first official outing of the Pacific Northwest Soccer Oldtimers Association, held in Black Diamond.

For one day, at least, “The Diamond” was the Cooperstown of soccer. About 140 ex-booters, the youngest in his 50s and the oldest 91, were reunited in the little hill town southeast of Renton.

Main attraction was a collection of old photographs, trophies, and memorabilia, rounded up by Pep Peery, association secretary. By coincidence, a slimmer, black-haired Peery appeared in several of the snapshots.

Mining-community teams dominated the display: Black Diamond, McKay Coal, Ravensdale, Carbonado, Wilkeson. That’s where it all started, the diggers from Wales and England and Italy playing their favorite game in the early part of the century. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 13, 1904

General Manager Ford ends negotiations in southern city

J.C. Ford

J.C. Ford

Rich coal deposits on C. & P. S. Ry. transferred for $1,000,000

SAN FRANCISCO, Friday, May 13 — J.C. Ford, general manager of the Pacific Coast Company, has been in this city for some days negotiating with President H.H. Taylor for the purchase of the Black Diamond coal mines on Puget Sound.

This afternoon at the office of the Black Diamond Company a representative of The Times was told that the deal had been closed. The price named was $1,000,000. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 3, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

About a mile and a quarter southeasterly from Franklin and about the same distance due east from the entrance to the Pacosco Mine, is the Hyde Mine.

The Hyde Mine was originally developed by sinking a slope on Number Twelve Seam, then later a rock tunnel was driven connecting this slope with the well-known McKay Seam. This mine was opened prior to 1909, but was not extensively developed until the McKay Coal Seam was found, which was a year or two later.

Gangways were driven to the north and to the northwest, toward what is now Pacosco Mine, and gangways were also driven to the south along the strikes of both the McKay and the Number Twelve. (more…)

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