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Posts Tagged ‘meat market’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 27, 1925

These handsome gentlemen run the stores. From left to right, upper row, they are C.T. Paulson of Carbonado, H.W. Doust of Newcastle, Malcolm McPhee, purchasing agent; lower row, L.W. Foreman of Burnett, H.M. McDowell of Black Diamond, and E.F. De Grandpre, Manager of Miscellaneous Operations. This picture shows them working hard at a business meeting.

Mr. McPhee buys the goods, the store managers sell them, and Mr. De Grandpre gets all the money. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 19, 1925

Tramways and aerial cables are common sights around metal mines, but it’s uncommon to find a coal mine with its entrance 450 feet below the level of the surrounding country. The above view shows the “incline” at Carbonado, a 35-degree pitch, down which all supplies and the daily shifts are lowered and raised.

Carbonado Comments

Carbonado victor in soccer battle

Battling the valiant Newcastle soccer eleven, the Carbonado squad last Sunday put up such a fight that the score ended 4 to 0, with the Carbon lads on the long end. Carbonado played a fast game.

Newcastle put up a fair defense, but with a number of new men, and also handicapped by a recent period of idleness, the Coal Creek team could make little headway against the strong Carbon defense. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 12, 1925

Feb. 12, 1809—Apr. 15, 1865

Feb. 12, 1809—Apr. 15, 1865

One hundred sixteen years ago the Great Emancipator was born amid humbler surroundings than is the birthright of most Americans today. Yet his memory is hallowed year by year by millions, and the example of his noble ideals is set before every schoolchild; an inspiration to the attainment of the loftiest pinnacle of success, no matter how lowly the start. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 25, 1978

By R. Dianne Wilson

Part of the IGA crew at Black Diamond’s Hi-Lo Market. From left, Daryl Taylor, Frank Zumek, Charlie Ash, Lois Zumek, Jeff Plant, and Joe Zumek. Voice photos by Bob Gerbing.

Part of the IGA crew at Black Diamond’s Hi-Lo Market. From left, Daryl Taylor, Frank Zumek, Charlie Ash, Lois Zumek, Jeff Plant, and Joe Zumek. Voice photos by Bob Gerbing.

A recent poll disclosed that the words “market” and “shopping” mean a variety of things to many people. Obviously a market is a place where they go to buy food and other items available. Often, however, it is more than that.

Sometimes people make a “trip to the store” because they are tired of staying indoors because of bad weather, and some may go because they are lonely and want to see a smiling face and have someone to talk to (as most checkers will agree).

In gathering material for this article, we walked slowly through the Black Diamond store with open eyes, as opposed to many rush-hour trips, and noted the many things now available, including fishing and sporting gear, home repair items, and small kitchen appliances. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 6, 1913

Ten thousand dollars’ worth of damage resulted from fire in mining town

These buildings were located where the Green River Eagles #1490 is today.

BLACK DIAMOND, Wash., Saturday, June 6—Fire early this morning completely destroyed the Black Diamond Hotel and annex and the Gibbon Hotel, all owned by Frank W. Bishop, the Black Diamond meat market owned by Pete Fredericksen, and the Bowen residence owned by J.H. Bowen. Damage resulted to the post office building owned by Charles McKinnon and the ice cream parlor owned by John E. Davies. The loss is approximately $10,000.

The fire started about 1 o’clock and in less than ten minutes after the fire whistle commenced to blow every man and woman in the little village turned out to fight the flames. After three hours of fierce fighting all danger was past.

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, April 1977

By Harry Rossi & Norma Gumser

Pacific Coast Co. Hotel

The 67-room Pacific Coast Co. Hotel was across the street from the depot/museum, where the Eagles are today.

Harry Rossi was ten years old or thereabouts [ca. 1930], and it was his chore after school to pick up the trimmings from the Pacific Coast Hotel. It made good food for the hogs.

He crossed the street at the depot with his load, down the wooden sidewalk going home. At the tavern, there were these three young men loafing out in front. One of them tripped Harry and his can of slop spilled all over the sidewalk. The young men roared with laughter and Harry scrambled to pick up the pieces.

He hurried home, down the broad sidewalk, past the garage, past the dry goods store, the meat market, and the bakery, and down the hill to home. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 27, 1923

Herewith the Bulletin publishes the first picture made public of the new Primrose tunnel at Newcastle, which only recently was completed to a distance of 650 feet where the new coal seam was reached.

Three shifts of gangway and counter driving will now be kept continuously on the development, and according to estimates, the new opening will be producing coal in commercial quantities by the early part of next fall.

In the foreground of the picture can be seen John G. Schoning of the United States Bureau of Mines; E.L. Fortney, fireboss; Paul Gallagher, former superintendent at Newcastle; and D.C. Botting, manager of mines. (more…)

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