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Posts Tagged ‘Melmont’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 23, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The town of Fairfax, declared the “prettiest mining town around,” showing the turn-table at the extreme right above center. Mine buildings are in front and the school is on the left. Carbon River runs through the trees at the top or the photo. (Original copy from Mr. and Mrs. Tony Basselli.) Photo courtesy of Steve Meitzler, Heritage Quest Press, Orting, WA., publisher of the book, Carbon River Coal Country.

Riding the Northern Pacific Railroad to the upper end of the Carbon River Canyon or tooling along to Mount Rainier in a Model T, tourists would pass close to three mining towns: Melmont, Fairfax, and Montezuma.

First, beyond Carbonado, was Melmont, situated between the Carbon River and the NPR line. A bridge spanning the Carbon River ran between the company hotel and the saloon with the depot and school on the hillside above. On the left end of the bridge was the road connecting to Fairfax. This bridge was nearly a little beyond the high bridge which spans the canyon today. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 30, 1913

Principal is coming meeting of International at Indianapolis, other that of State Federation of Labor

Delegates selected by referendum vote

Nine of ten or more to go East January 15 already known—smaller unions combine to reduce expenses

By C.J. Stratton

Two big labor conventions in progress at the same time will divide the attention and interest of the union coal miners of the state of Washington next month, and three score or more of the diggers of black diamonds will have the honor of sitting in them as delegates representing the United Mine Workers of America, of which this state forms District No. 10. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 19, 1906

Pacific Coast Co. and Northern Pacific may come under provisions which prohibit carriers operating plants

Shipments outside Washington forbidden by the operators, but Hill line will me most seriously hurt by rule; Piles made fight to help local industries and Portland coal market to suffer if supply must be cut off

If the House agrees to the amendment made by the United States senate, forbidding common carriers from hauling coal mined in their own properties to points outside the state, the Pacific Coast Company and Northern Pacific will be seriously affected.

It was to save the coal properties of these two lines that United States Senator S.H. Piles is understood to have introduced his amendment exempting lines whose principal business is not that of a common carrier.

Just how this would have helped the Northern Pacific is not clear, but it would have been of some advantage to the Pacific Coast Company. That it was lost is believed by railroad men to have been due to the necessity for regulating the anthracite roads. The Pacific Coast Company can probably escape the provisions of the bill, but it will be a more expensive task to market the coal of that corporation. The Northern Pacific is expected to be compelled to limit its market to this state. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 20, 1922

This photo shows a long row of identically-built houses in the eastern Pierce County coal mining town of Burnett, circa 1920. In the early days, coal mining companies had to attract a labor force to remote areas where housing was scarce. The solution was to build rows of identical houses to reduce construction costs. Mining in the Burnett area, near Wilkeson, began in 1881 with a water level drift mine operated by the South Prairie Coal Company. In 1906 control of the Burnett mines passed to Pacific Coast Coal Co. For a number of years, Burnett was the top-producing coal mine in Pierce County. Other notable Pierce County coal mining towns include Wilkeson, Carbonado, Melmont, Fairfax, Montesuma, Ashford, and Pittsburg which was later known as Spiketon or Morristown. This photo comes from the Pacific Coast Company collection of photos. (Enumclaw Courier-Herald, August 17, 2011)

This photo shows a long row of identically-built houses in the eastern Pierce County coal mining town of Burnett, circa 1920. In the early days, coal mining companies had to attract a labor force to remote areas where housing was scarce. The solution was to build rows of identical houses to reduce construction costs. Mining in the Burnett area, near Wilkeson, began in 1881 with a water level drift mine operated by the South Prairie Coal Company. In 1906 control of the Burnett mines passed to Pacific Coast Coal Co. For a number of years, Burnett was the top-producing coal mine in Pierce County. Other notable Pierce County coal mining towns include Wilkeson, Carbonado, Melmont, Fairfax, Montesuma, Ashford, and Pittsburg which was later known as Spiketon or Morristown. This photo comes from the Pacific Coast Company collection of photos. (Enumclaw Courier-Herald, August 17, 2011)

“The trouble with many men is that they are too diffident,” began Industrial Engineer Lindsey, the day Ye Editor drifted into his office on the seventh floor of the Smith Building, Seattle. (more…)

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