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Posts Tagged ‘Milwaukee Railroad’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, June 18, 1978

By Joan Mann

1971 photograph of Brunton farmhouse

1971 photograph of Brunton farmhouse

Venerable 73-year-old farmhouse with ten bedrooms is the home of Pat Brunton. It also is a Maple Valley institution. When she and her husband, the late Frederic K. Brunton, purchased the house with its surrounding 67 acres, they did not realize they also were getting a chapter in the history of the valley.

The house was built in 1905 by railroad contractor Olaf Olson, who built the narrow-gauge railway to the Monte Cristo mines and the tunnels through Rogers Pass for Canadian Pacific trains and constructed a tunnel through the Cascades for the Milwaukee Railroad. The walls of the house are solid concrete, a material familiar to Olson, all of it mixed by hand and poured by laborers who lived in tents on the site during construction. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, June 12, 1960

Jack Hayes, 90 years old Tuesday, recalls early-day logging and mining at Renton

By Morda Slauson

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

John E. (Jack) Hayes, long-time resident of Renton, sat beside a view window in his present home in West Seattle as he read a book of King County history, telling of pioneer days he remembers. — Times photo by Roy Scully.

A man who has been a Washingtonian since 1872 will celebrate his 90th birthday anniversary Tuesday.

He is John E. Hayes, 1734 Alki Av., known affectionatly as “Jack” to hundreds of South King County residents. Until recently, he resided at Renton, his home most of the years since 1880.

Hayes remembers old-time hay and potato fields where the big, new shopping center was built in the past year at the foot of Earlington Hill.

As a boy, he greased skids for the first logging at the Highlands, east of Renton. Now, modern machinery is tearing up the hillside to extend a state highway.

As a man he owned a homestead at Buffalo Station, on Rainier Avenue, which was taken by the government in the Second World War for expansion of Renton Airport.

On a recent trip around Renton, Hayes surveyed the shopping center and remembered when he went “hitching” in the hay fields, belonging to Erasmus Smithers, who with J.P. Morris and C.B. Shattuck, plotted the town of Renton in 1878. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 8, 1907

President A.J. Earling of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul gave out a statement in Milwaukee today to the effect that the St. Paul will complete the construction of its Pacific Coast line by 1909 and will be running trains into Seattle before the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition opens.

In connection with this announcement, Earling confirmed the report that the St. Paul has ordered the vacation of all property sold to his road in Tacoma and will immediately begin work on the terminal system of the St. Paul in that city. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 18, 1979

By Teresa Hensley

Circled above is the low area in the right abutment of the masonry dam.

Circled above is the low area in the right abutment of the masonry dam.

“There is no imminent danger, and people should not be alarmed,” said Colonel John A. Poteat, the Army Corps Seattle District Engineer, in a press release last week from Seattle City Light about the masonry dam above the Cedar River.

In an earlier press conference it was revealed that the dam could prove unsafe in the event of a major flood.

Conditions which could trigger such an emergency—described as “a flood on top of a flood” by Joe Recchi, acting superintendent of City Light—have never been approached in the 75 years of the project. (more…)

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Maple Valley Historical Society, March 1987

Here’s where me and the railroad got together.

My brother went up to Maple Valley for some reason or other and saw this gang of railroad men working to save the track that was being washed out. Being nosy, he went up to the foreman and asked if they were hiring anybody and he said yes, and get anyone else you can.

He came home and got me and we started work filling gunny sacks with sand at 4:00 p.m. and didn’t stop til 4:00 p.m. the next day. The rain never let up and gunny sacks got hard to get because everyone else needed them too for the same reason we did. We wound up using sacks that had been filled with rock salt and the salt cut our hands making them very sore. We didn’t have the little bags they use nowadays but the 100-pound size which we about two-thirds filled. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 31, 1908

Fifteen minutes before a train loaded with 200 passengers would have been on it, the Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad bridge across the Cedar River beyond Maple Valley, fell under the burden of a coal train and plunged six cars of coal instead of the cars of human beings into the river.

Had the coal train succeeded in getting across, there is no doubt that the passenger train would have plunged into the river, still swollen by recent floods and no one knows how many lives would have been lost. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, March 24, 1919

An electric speeder of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railway, carrying seven employees, jumped the track while traveling at high speed, two miles east of Maple Valley station, at 4:30 p.m. Saturday.

All seven men were injured, three severely. They were taken to the Providence hospital. Their names are:

William Halland, 30, badly crushed left leg; leg amputated at hospital.

John McLeod, 39, chest and back crushed.

William McDonald, 51, back sprained, shoulder wrenched, cuts about head.

Percy Wiltz, 32, dislocated knee cap.

John McDonald, 35, badly sprained wrist, body bruises.

William Hammond, 32, bruises and cuts about the head.

Alfred B. Gratty, 39, bruised head, shoulder, and legs.

Halland and McLeod were reported in an improved condition Monday.

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