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Posts Tagged ‘Milwaukee Railroad’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, August 9, 1912

In anticipation of labor trouble at the mines in Western Washington from which it obtains its fuel supply, the Northern Pacific is storing 45,000 tons of coal at its Puget Sound terminals.

A pile of 15,000 tons of coal has been accumulated at Seattle and 30,000 tons more are being stored at Auburn, 20 miles south of here, where the transcontinental line connects with the coast line.

The Chicago Milwaukee & Puget Sound Railway, the Great Northern, and the Oregon–Washington Railroad and Navigation Company burn oil on most of their lines in Washington and would not be affected by a strike in the mines.

The agreement between the operators and the miners ends September 1. Agents of the union and the operator are conducting negotiations for a new agreement and labor leaders predict that all differences will be adjusted satisfactorily.

Three hundred men employed in the mine at Bayne went on strike a month ago and are still out.

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 2, 1908

By “W.T.P.”

Suppose you were a policeman with a beat of 700 square miles.

Suppose this included sixteen coal mining towns, where the rough element predominated, and fights, murders, and all sorts of crimes succeeded each other so rapidly that you hardly had a breathing space between.

Suppose you were the only officer of the law in all this district, and that your hours were from 8 o’clock every morning, including Sunday, to 8 o’clock the next.

Suppose your duties had thrown you into desperate fights, open revolver battles, chases that lasted for days at a time through the seemingly trackless woods, and that a dozen times you had been within an inch of your life.

If you could meet all these conditions you would be the counterpart of Matt Starwich, deputy sheriff for the district of Ravensdale, and you would be an “every-day hero.” There are few people in the county who have more deeds of heroism to their credit than this same Matt Starwich. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 28, 1907

(1) Steam shovel making cut at junction of new road with Columbia & Puget Sound line at Maple Valley. (2) Another view of same. This stream will be bridged by a 200-foot steel span. (3) Another view of tunnel, showing northwest end. (4) Piledriver constructing temporary trestle-work in Cedar River bed, two miles from Maple Valley. (5) A cut from which 16,000 cubic yards of earth have been removed. (6) Southeast end of the tunnel, six miles from Maple Valley.

(1) Steam shovel making cut at junction of new road with Columbia & Puget Sound line at Maple Valley. (2) Another view of same. This stream will be bridged by a 200-foot steel span. (3) Another view of tunnel, showing northwest end. (4) Pile driver constructing temporary trestle-work in Cedar River bed, two miles from Maple Valley. (5) A cut from which 16,000 cubic yards of earth have been removed. (6) Southeast end of the tunnel, six miles from Maple Valley.

When one of the greatest common carriers of the country announced its determination to extend its line to the Pacific Coast, with Seattle as its terminal, excitement waxed for the customary nine days and then waned. During that time the land through which it was foreordained the road must pass advanced enormously in value, changed hands countless times, and finally became stably established in price on the market.

The advent of the great road was more or less a matter of futurity, the public was too busily occupied with the immediate present to concern itself with the future and the activities of the road were forgotten. But while the public has neglected to take cognizance of its operations, they have nevertheless been productive of results.

Armies of workmen are scattered along its roadbed for hundreds of miles, its construction work has now been extended to practically the outskirts of the city and it be only a matter of a few months before the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul again commands the attention of the public by sending its first train over the completed road to Seattle.

At Maple Valley, twenty-two miles from Seattle, the construction work has been going on rapidly. The railroad’s efforts are centered on the seven miles intervening between the intake of the Cedar River water system and Maple Valley. Beyond the intake the operations are confined almost entirely to clearing the right of way to North Bend, where the road is also engaged in construction work on a large scale. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, July 14, 1921

Dobson says work will be done as soon as possible and when money is available

The overhead bridge across the Milwaukee railroad in Maplevalley will be installed as soon as possible, said Commissioner Thomas Dobson in an interview Wednesday.

“Granges may pass resolutions from now until doomsday but without the money it is impossible for us to do the work at the present time although we realize the necessity for it and would like very much to see it built,” he said. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, June 18, 1978

By Joan Mann

1971 photograph of Brunton farmhouse

1971 photograph of Brunton farmhouse

Venerable 73-year-old farmhouse with ten bedrooms is the home of Pat Brunton. It also is a Maple Valley institution. When she and her husband, the late Frederic K. Brunton, purchased the house with its surrounding 67 acres, they did not realize they also were getting a chapter in the history of the valley.

The house was built in 1905 by railroad contractor Olaf Olson, who built the narrow-gauge railway to the Monte Cristo mines and the tunnels through Rogers Pass for Canadian Pacific trains and constructed a tunnel through the Cascades for the Milwaukee Railroad. The walls of the house are solid concrete, a material familiar to Olson, all of it mixed by hand and poured by laborers who lived in tents on the site during construction. (more…)

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