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Posts Tagged ‘Milwaukee Railroad’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 1, 1922

Green River mill at Baldi completely destroyed

Pacific States Company loses three outfits, thousands in railway equipment

Forest fire damage to the Pacific States Lumber Company, both at Selleck and Cedar Falls, was increased overnight with the loss last night of Camp No. 18 at Cedar Falls. This makes three logging camps lost by the company, including all the bridges on eleven miles of railway, a coal bunker, twelve donkey engines, fifteen freight cars, a section camp, an enormous amount of fallen timber, and several cars of logs. Two small residences at Selleck also burned last night. Today there was virtually no wind around the company’s territory and it was reported the fire situation was getting under control. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 6, 1917

Pacific States Lumber Company wants to purchase material that will take years to log

That an offer will be made to the city of Seattle to purchase about 100,000,000 feet of standing timber in the Cedar River watershed, at a price of approximately $1,000,000, has been known to various city officials for several days, as a part of the general plan of the Pacific States Lumber Company to begin logging operations that will extend over a period of several years. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 10, 1906

Information secured by Milwaukee railroad from engineering crews now indicates that route is best

Surveyors kept in the mountains and are continuing investigations of all possible means of reaching coast

Heavy snows retarding final examination and definite announcement cannot be made until all reports are in

The Milwaukee railroad will use, according to indications, Snoqualmie Pass in crossing the Cascade Mountains, entering Seattle by way of the Cedar River Valley. If this route is finally accepted by the Milwaukee the new transcontinental line will parallel the Columbia & Puget Sound from Maple Valley into Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in the Renton Historical Society & Museum Quarterly, December 2012

By Kent Sullivan

Northern Pacific depot in Renton, circa 1912. (RHM# 41.0568)

I live in Kirkland, am a member of the Northern Pacific Railway Historical Association (NPRHA), and am an avid researcher of the Northern Pacific’s (NP) line along the east side of Lake Washington, known as the Lake Washington Belt Line and, for much of its history, the 11th Subdivision of the Tacoma Division.

I became especially interested in the Renton area after I became the latest custodian of the train order signal that hung on the Renton depot for almost 70 years at the corner of 5th Street and Burnett Avenue. I assumed the story of the Renton depot would be very simple and was surprised to find it was a bit complicated, and thought that readers of this newsletter might enjoy hearing what I learned. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, September 2007

Bud and Ora Mable (Babe) relax in the living room of their remodeled cabin they purchased in Orchard Grove 61 years ago. Photo by Barbara Nilson.

In 1946 Babe Bodvin was traveling down Dorre Don Way visiting a friend of her mother’s when she spotted a two-room cabin for sale. It was owned by a doctor who had built it in 1936. She went home to Seattle to ask her husband, Bud, if they could buy it at $850 for an acre of ground and the cabin. He said yes and 61 years later they’re still there.

They celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary in April. Bud said they were married in her folk’s home right where the Space Needle is today. Her folks, Charles and Capitoly Werl, later moved to Hobart in the 1940s.

Bud said, “All there was to the cabin was a kitchen and the room that is now their living room, nothing else; no ceilings, no running water, an outhouse, we used the fireplace for heat.” (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS The Bugle, January 1995

Can you guess where and when this picture was taken?

This photograph was taken in the early 1940s by Chester Gibbon. He drove in from the Maple Valley highway on the Pipeline Road and went to the edge of the hill a little west of the point where Highway 18 now drops down into the valley.

In the foreground is Bain Road, and the Vickery and Perry homes and outbuildings. The PC [Pacific Coast] and Milwaukee trestles are at right. In the center of the picture can be seen the old grade school and the gym.

In the middle at left is the false front of the Maple Valley Tavern. An old building that served as the post office and residence of Postmistress Miriam Mahaffey is just below the school.

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, April 14, 1908

One is found with bullet hole through his leg

Both confess participation in the shooting that led to the death of Kent marshal—Star staff correspondent with the posse when the men were captured—Prisoners give description of fourth man, who escaped

By G. Stuart Costello
Special Staff Correspondent

G. Stuart Costello, a member of The Star’s local staff, was the only newspaper correspondent actually with Deputy Sheriff Starwich’s posse during the hard tramp over the mountains on the trail of the murderer of Marshal Frank Miller. Other correspondents were some distance in the rear. This information does not come to The Star from Mr. Costello, who is a modest young gentleman, but comes from Deputy Sheriffs Joe Hill and Chet Belding, who reached Seattle this morning.

MARTIN, Wash., April 14—After a dramatic chase extending over 20 miles, over the crest of the Cascade mountains through Snoqualmie Pass, the posse headed by Deputy Sheriffs Matt Starwich and John Liner yesterday captured Yoven S. Borsvich, aged 23, and Nick Pettrich, aged 28, the remaining members of the gang, which on last Thursday night, shot and fatally wounded Marshal Frank Miller at Kent, and later wounded Deputy Sheriff Jack Storey in the Snoqualmie Valley.

Pettrich has a bullet hole through the lower part of his left leg and will either lose his leg or his life from blood poisoning. The man spent two days and nights barefooted in the snow of the mountains, and the wound is suppurating badly.

The wound was received in the battle with Deputies Starwich and Storey Saturday. One of Starwich’s bullets also passed through the lapel and back of the man’s coat. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, April 12, 1923

Local banks and Renton agency co-operating in new Ford plan

A new plan for purchasing Ford cars whereby prospective purchasers may avail themselves of banking facilities and start an account with which to buy a car is announced today by the Ford Motor Company and by banks with whom Ford dealers do business. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, March 19, 1908

Hold-up man attempts to rob Maple Valley saloon, but bartender resists—robber escapes and is arrested in Seattle

After having on Tuesday night engaged in a desperate hand-to-hand fight with the bartender of Pat Quinnan’s saloon at Maple Valley, while attempting to hold up the place, as a result of which he escaped minus his coat, mask, and hat, Ben Dixon, aged 26, was captured last evening in his room at the Alaska Commercial hotel in this city. The arrest was made by Deputy Sheriff Matt Starwich and his assistant, Matt O’Grady, of Ravensdale. (more…)

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