Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Milwaukee Railroad’

Originally published in the Seattle Times, November 10, 1963

By Lucile McDonald

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

One of the curiosities uncovered during freeway construction was a tar-coated 40-inch steel pipe laid down the west side of Capital Hill. Two sections were dug out and discarded for scrap, the rest was plugged with cement and left buried in the slope.

Workmen who witnessed removal of this obstacle to the path of progress may not have known they were viewing the penstock which fed Cedar River water into the first electric power plant on Lake Union. The public has forgotten thoroughly the function of a small structure hemmed in by the King County Welfare Department’s medical service office and the City Light’s stand-by steam plant at Eastlake Avenue and Nelson Place.

The building is completely empty except for a table and chairs in a room used as a voting precinct once or twice a year. If you go around in back, you can see where Lake Union once lapped at the base of the rear wall and a tail race poured out water from the Volunteer Park reservoir after its force had driven the Pelton bucket wheel of the old electric generator inside the little building.

The pipes carried the reservoir overflow down the hill, one being the penstock and the other a drain, still in use, that had been relocated at a lower level.

Through these pipes, Cedar River water mingled with Lake Union and flowed out into Salmon Bay before there was a ship canal.

The Cedar has been much manipulated by man. Its water flows into hundreds of thousands of homes and the current it generates partially lights them. It supplies most of the make-up water needed to operate the ship canal’s Chittenden Locks. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, October 27, 1921

Burglars, believed to be operating with an automobile or light truck, broke into Gibbon’s store late Friday night or early Saturday morning and stole about $500 worth of merchandise of all description.

Tobacco, in the amount of $300, was the major portion of their loot. Other articles stolen include two sacks of sugar, all the hams and bacon, six pairs of shoes, socks, shirts, inner tubes, etc. Entrance was effected through a warehouse window. Deputy sheriffs are investigating. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, October 19, 1952

Seattle Sunday Times, October 19, 1952The view of Maple Valley in autumn depicted on Page 1 of this Magazine Section appealed to Parker McAllister, Times staff artist, as most appropriate for inclusion in his series of rural scenes in the Puget Sound country. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Northwest Post Card Club newsletter; July, August, September 2017

By Ken Jensen

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

For the miners and their families in turn-of-the-century Black Diamond—an isolated company town near the Cascade foothills of South King County, Washington—the 33-mile trip to Seattle was an all-day journey. The company’s railroad and circa 1885 depot, along with its general store, were the townspeople’s only real connection to the outside world.

In 1904 the Pacific Coast Co. owned all of Black Diamond—its mines, its land, its stores, pretty much everything—as well as neighboring Franklin and a handful of other King and Pierce county towns. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 22, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

The rebuilt Selleck School, completed in 1930, now serves as the Pacific States Condominiums. This April 10, 1940, photo is courtesy King County Assessor Property Card collection, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Branch.

The rebuilt Selleck School, completed in 1930. This April 10, 1940, photo is courtesy King County Assessor Property Card collection, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Branch.

At the end the Kent-Kangley Road east of Maple Valley is the mill town of Selleck, which still exists today; next door was the town of Lavender, or “Jap Town.” The mill is gone, but the school is still there and about 16 of the original houses. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 10, 1977

Retired train dispatcher Don Vernor of Maple Valley was honored by friends and co-workers at a recent reception. He has been “on the job” here since 1945 and prior to that worked as a dispatcher and telegrapher in Nevada. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

Retired train dispatcher Don Vernor of Maple Valley was honored by friends and co-workers at a recent reception. He has been “on the job” here since 1945 and prior to that worked as a dispatcher and telegrapher in Nevada. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

A number of friends, co-workers, and their spouses brought refreshments and gifts on Saturday afternoon, July 30, to the Maple Valley railroad station to wish Don Vernor well upon his retirement as dispatcher and telegrapher after nearly 33 years at that post.

He had been “on the job” in Maple Valley since January 1945. For three years prior to that he worked as dispatcher and telegrapher in Nevada.

“A train dispatcher’s job,” Vernor explains, “is to keep track at all times of the trains in his area. We always have telephone contact station to station.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 24, 1906

Chief Engineer James Anderson of the Pacific Coast Company has been instructed to prepare estimates of cost for double-tracking the line of the Columbia & Puget Sound between Seattle and Black River Junction. The work will be done immediately. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »