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Posts Tagged ‘Mine #14’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 11, 1984

by Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

What should to be done with 11 acres of King County-owned land in the center of Black Diamond?

A recently completed study done for the King County Housing Authority recommends phased development of the site with single-family, owner-occupied homes and rental apartments for moderate- to low-income elderly persons.

The Housing Authority presented its recommendations to residents during a public meeting last night at the Black Diamond Elementary School. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 17, 1925

This isn’t a Santa Claus scene, though C.O. Hilen, manager of the Keithly Wood & Coal Co., the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Everett branch, will probably expect old Kris Kringle to put in an appearance at the right time.

Mr. Hilen installed the fireplace in his office several months ago and the Camp Fire Girls of Everett participated in the ceremony of starting the first fire, the fuel for which was Diamond Briquets, of course. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, October 30, 1906

While famine is threatened in this city coal mine owners are first supplying the wants of San Francisco and Alaska—output also being curtailed

Seattle is threatened by a coal famine. Already prices of coal have been raised so that today Seattle householders are paying from $1 to $2 more per ton than they were two months ago. The excuse given for this raise is that there is today a shortage of coal.

To old customers coal dealers are suggesting that if they would not suffer later in the winter orders for a full season’s supply should be given at once. The Star has endeavored to discover the cause of this shortage and probable famine. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, March 2007

Howard Botts

Howard Botts

Black Diamond is my favorite subject since I’ve lived there all my life. I think these two towns, Maple Valley and Black Diamond, have some things in common; a couple of them are Highway 169 and railroads.

People in Seattle heard that the Northern Pacific was coming to this area and going to Tacoma.

They felt if they couldn’t have that they were going to build their own railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla over the pass. So they started in 1873, got as far as Renton in 1876; then extended it to Newcastle. In 1880 Henry Villard, of the Northern Pacific, bought it from the Black Diamond Coal Company and renamed it the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 23, 1900

Entombed in a deadly pocket

T.A. Davis, one of the oldest coal miners on the coast, caught in the rush of burning fluid and held to his death—comrades work to find his body—two workmen were badly injured

One man is entombed in a pocket of terrible coal gas and doubtless dead and two are seriously burned as a result of an explosion in one of the Black Diamond mines at 10 o’clock Wednesday morning.

The man believed to be dead is T.A. Davis, one of the oldest employees of the company.

The injured are Maurice Roccia and a miner named Kline. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 24, 1913

Blast in Black Diamond Mine, of unknown origin, kills workman—his fellows in serious condition

Violation of rules suspected as cause: Required precautions observed by Pacific Coast Co., exposed lamp or match thought to blame

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

Jack Jackson was killed and Ned Rossi and Eugene Pelline, miners, were seriously burned in an explosion this morning on the tenth level of No. 14 mine at Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 24, 1900

Black Diamond miners have failed to find their dead companion’s remains

P.B. Cornwall

P.B. Cornwall

The Black Diamond coal miners are working to find the body of their comrade, T.A. Davis, who was buried in the mine at the time of the explosion Wednesday morning. They are digging night and day to reach the pocket where his body is supposed to be, but up to last night had failed to reach it.

During the search for the dead miner’s body all work on Mine No. 14, in which the explosion occurred, has been suspended, and the workmen in shifts are digging through the barrier of rock and coal to the head of the breast where Davis is believed to be entombed. They will keep at their labors night and day until they find the remains. (more…)

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