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Posts Tagged ‘mine accidents’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 14, 1888

No change for better or worse reported—the miners working upon brattice work

No change for better or worse was reported from the Franklin coal mine fire yesterday. Mr. Milner went out there again, going through the mine with Superintendent Watkins. He authorizes the denial of the rumor of Mr. Watkins’ resignation.

The fire is in the lower McKay tunnel, and has been located in a worked out “breast.” Mr. Milner said they were attempting to smother it out, with every prospect of success. The air is to be shut out by brattice work, which the miners began to put up Wednesday night, and which it was expected to be completed by this morning.

The effort to extinguish the fire by flooding the mine has been abandoned. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 13, 1910

Explosion of fire damp results when fire eats through from old workings in N.W. Imp. Co.’s property

Five men injured and two entombed

An explosion in the Northwestern Improvement Company’s mine at Ravensdale at 11 o’clock this morning fatally injured three miners, seriously injured two others, and imprisoned two more.

A 2 o’clock this afternoon the mine was on fire and the fate of the two imprisoned men is in doubt. Rescuers are at work, but unless the prisoners are liberated within the next two hours they will be consumed by the flames. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 12, 1895

Since the bodies of the four miners, who lost their lives in the mine fire at Franklin October 17 last, have been recovered, the strain on the nerves of the workmen of the mine has been relieved and the miners have now but one object in view—the reopening of the mine.

It is believed that coal will be coming up the main slope by January 10. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 11, 1895

Entombed three months: The four men who went down in the coal mine during a slope fire—work of rescue has been progressing for about a month

B.F. Bush, general superintendent of the Oregon Improvement Company, received word today from Franklin that the bodies of the four miners who lost their lives in the mine fire of October 17 last had been recovered. The bodies were almost incinerated, but were identified by articles and particles of clothing found on the bodies. (more…)

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Extracted from Carbonado: The History of a Coal Mining Town in the Foothills of Mount Rainier, 1880-1937, by John Hamilton Streepy, May 1999

Row of tombstones from the December 9, 1899 catastrophe at Carbonado.

Row of tombstones from the December 9, 1899 catastrophe at Carbonado.

Rees Jones, the fireboss, declared mine number seven clear of gas on 9 December 1899, and allowed the morning shift to enter the mine to begin their workday. With his pipe and tobacco firmly in his pocket, Ben Zedler and seventy-two others started their long march into the depths of the earth to mine coal on the shift from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.1 (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 7, 1895

No trace of the dead bodies. Coal will be shipped from No. 7 this month—Railroad Avenue death-trap closed

The main slope of the Oregon Improvement Company’s mine at Franklin, which has been closed since the recent disaster, has been opened to the sixth level, and before the end of the present month will be again in condition for the taking out of coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 21, 2001

By Barbara Nilson

The former home of Luigi and Aurora Pagani at the foot of Merino Street in Black Diamond is being considered as a Historical Landmark by the King County Landmarks and Heritage commission; hearing is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 29 at 7 p.m., at the Black Diamond Community Center. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

The former home of Luigi and Aurora Pagani at the foot of Merino Street in Black Diamond is being considered as a Historical Landmark by the King County Landmarks and Heritage commission; hearing is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 29 at 7 p.m., at the Black Diamond Community Center. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

An important hearing to support the establishment of two historical landmarks in the area, the former TaHoMa High School on S.E. 216th Street and the Pagani miner’s home in Black Diamond on Merino Street, will be held on Thursday, Nov. 29 at 7 p.m. at the Black Diamond Community Center, 31605 – 3rd Ave., by the King County Landmarks and Heritage Commission. (more…)

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