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Posts Tagged ‘mine accidents’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 18, 1895

The slope is stopped up

Franklin mines continue to be the scene of excitement—every effort was made to rescue the four unfortunate men without avail

The bodies of the four men known to have perished in the slope fire yesterday at the Franklin coal mines have not been recovered and the fire has not yet been extinguished, although the flames have been got under control and the slope closed up with timbers, sand, and dirt.

Of the men dead, full mention of whom was made in the 5 o’clock edition of last evening’s Times, John Glover was a white man and George W. Smalley, John Adams, and James Stafford were colored men, Smalley leaving a wife and child and Adams and Stafford being single men. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 17, 1895

Flames and smoke: The miners make a mad rush for safety

The fire broke out shortly after dinner—whole town is wild with excitement and every man is endeavoring to put out the fire by shoveling dirt into the mouth of the burning slope

Dirty job: Franklin miners, ca. 1915.

Dirty job: Franklin miners, ca. 1915.

News reached the city about 1:30 o’clock this afternoon from Franklin stating that fire had broken out in the main slope, between the fifth and sixth levels, and that many miners were cut off from escape. Later it was ascertained that most of the men in the men had gotten out by means of the rock tunnel to another avenue of escape.

For a time it was reported that four men only were nearly killed, but at the time of going to press all of the men have been accounted for except three, and these, it is believed, are dead. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 13, 1904

While adjusting brushes in a high-power dynamo, W.S. MacDonald, electrician at the coal mines at Lawson, near Black Diamond, was electrocuted last evening at 6:30 o’clock. Death was probably instantaneous. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1895

Phil Early and another employee named Gibson so badly burned and injured that they died today—the cause of the explosion is not known

Tombstone of Romulous Monroe Gibson, who died in an boiler explosion at Franklin on October 3, 1895.

Tombstone of Romulous Monroe Gibson, who died in an boiler explosion at Franklin on October 3, 1895.

The Franklin mines have been the scene of another unfortunate accident by which two men lost their lives. Yesterday morning one of the boilers in a battery located at the edge of Green River, far below the mine proper, exploded, and so badly burned and injured Phil Early and a man named [Romulous Monroe] Gibson, employees, that they died today from the effects. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 2, 1902

One man, supposed to have been lost, turns up safe and well

Inquest being held by Coroner Hoye this afternoon

BLACK DIAMOND, Friday, Oct. 2 — The number of victims of the explosion in the Lawson mine Wednesday night at present numbers eleven, with the possibility that two of the injured will die as a result of their hurts.

Until a late hour last night all but one of the bodies has been recovered. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 26, 1895

Franklin coal mines

Franklin coal mines, 1898

Andrew F. Burleigh, as counsel for the Oregon Improvement Company, this morning filed answers in four more suits which have been commenced against the company by Oliver Spencer as administrator for the estates of Fillippo Di Martino, Guiseppe Bosio, Luigi Ferrari, and Rocco Teti.

The deceased all met their deaths in the Franklin mine disaster.

The company sets up that their deaths were due to the error of judgment and mistake on the part of the fellow servants of the deceased, coupled with their own carelessness and negligent conduct. They should have, it is alleged, left the mine when informed that it was on fire.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 14, 1923

Chemical discovered during war oxidizes carbon monoxide, making it harmless

For more than two hours yesterday prominent coal miners, superintendents, engineers, foremen, representatives of the State Mine Department, and of the Seattle Fire and Police Departments gathered at the federal mine rescue station at the University of Washington and took part in a demonstration of a new “self rescuer,” or small gas mask which will permit a man to live in air heavily impregnated with deadly monoxide gas from forty minutes to more than an hour.

The demonstration was made in a small room, into which the exhaust of the White mine rescue truck of the government was piped. (more…)

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