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Posts Tagged ‘mine accidents’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 21, 1925

When Portland, Oregon, recently held its Home Beautiful Exposition, Ralph C. Dean, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Portland Depot, lost no time in demonstrating to the citizens of the Columbia River metropolis that Diamond Briquets were the ideal fuel to make beautiful homes comfortable as well.

This picture shows the booth which was arranged by R.R. English, city salesman, and which carried the message of Diamond Briquets to many Portland homes. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 17, 2011

By Barbara Nilson

Front of the Carbonado Saloon built in 1889 and now offering a special Senior Menu on Thursdays.

Every Thursday is Senior Citizen Day at the Carbonado Tavern built in 1889.

The saloon is an inviting place with a favorite niche to the right of the door with a gas stove, round table carved with years of names of thirsty patrons, and the walls covered with reminders of when Carbonado was a mining and logging community starting in 1870. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 14, 1925

Under the baton of Bandmaster Henry Carroll, the Black Diamond and Newcastle bands of the Pacific Coast Coal Company journeyed to Bellingham last week, where they participated in the celebration of the Sixth Annual Tulip Festival.

The two bands combined, made a musical organization of thirty-six pieces, and attired in miners’ caps they presented a fine and distinctive appearance. In the upper portion of the halftone they are shown lined up just before the big parade, while below the Bulletin photographer caught them in action. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 23, 1925

Years ago, the railroad depot was the most popular place in every small city or town, and the daily arrival of the limited was an event seldom missed by the population. Automobiles and motor stages have changed all this, however, and today the highway is more popular than the railway. Nevertheless, the Pacific Coast depot at Black Diamond is still an important place in the camp, and the daily dispatching of long train loads of coal is a sight most pleasing to everyone. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 9, 1925

Playing together for the first time this season, the soccer football squad at Newcastle has been one of the strong contenders for honors in the state league. The camp has loyally supported the boys and in turn the players have been a credit to the camp. One of the team, Bert Blondell, was chosen to play with the Washington All-Stars in the game against the All-Stars of Victoria, B.C.

In the picture, from left to right standing: Tim Riley, Jack Lucas, Don Campbell, Bert Blondell, Jock Clark, Jim Strang, Bob Gelling, Dave Forbes, Jimmy Walton, Joe Oschberger, and W.S. Hart. In front, left to right: Dan Minele, Bob Miles, C. Mikola, Arthur Kelly, Gus Lapsansky, Ted Jackson, captain of the team, Harold Phillips, Jim McCarthy, “Hen” Roberts. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 19, 1925

Here is shown a shipment of asphalt on the pier ready for loading into Pacific Coast box cars for shipment to the Briquet Plant. Asphalt is used in the manufacture of Diamond Briquets to bind the finely pulverized South Prairie and Black Diamond coal together. It is shipped from California by water in barrels.

When ready for melting at the Briquet Plant the barrels are broken up and the staves burned, as there is no method by which the hardened asphalt can be removed without destroying the container. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 12, 1925

Peter Bertoldi is the agent for the Pacific Coast Coal Company at its Georgetown Depot. This view shows him in front of his office at 5422 Duwamish Avenue.

Black Diamond Doings

Camp to possess model ball park

Final touches have now been put on the Black Diamond baseball park, which will make it one of the finest diamonds outside of the league parks. Grass seed has recently been planted on the infield, and two new dugouts have been built, and in addition the whole field has been carefully gone over and put in A-1 shape for the season.

The recent sunshine has brought out the baseball aspirants, and judging from the early work-outs Black Diamond will have a wealth of material from which to build up a first class ball team this season.

New uniforms have been ordered, of a solid grey color, with the company trade mark on the left breast and an orange diamond with a black letter “B” on black caps. The socks are black and white. The uniforms are on display this week in the windows of Piper & Taft in Seattle. (more…)

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