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Posts Tagged ‘mine accidents’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 15, 1900

Nicola Delduca, a laborer, enters the coal pits with an open-flame lamp and is instantly killed—two others are injured

Nicola Delduca’s name is etched in granite at the Coal Miners' Honor Garden, located on the grounds of the Black Diamond Museum.

Nicola Delduca’s name is etched in granite at the Coal Miners’ Honor Garden, located on the grounds of the Black Diamond Museum.

Deputy Coroner Powers returned yesterday morning from Black Diamond, where he held an inquest over the remains of one of the three men who were the victims of a mine explosion at that place on Monday.

Nicola Delduca, an Italian, aged 38 years, was found dead in the level in which the explosion occurred, and George Frasiola and Sylvester Cevera now lie at Providence hospital in a critical condition as a result of the injuries which they received. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, September 4, 1987

By Debra Nelson

Les Van Hoof is one of the new breed of coal miners who operate the levers of heavy equipment rather than picks and shovels. (Staff photo by Gary Kissel.)

Les Van Hoof is one of the new breed of coal miners who operate the levers of heavy equipment rather than picks and shovels. (Staff photo by Gary Kissel.)

Coal mining… the words evoke images of dark mine shafts, dynamite, and hardy men, exhausted from the hazards of blasting the mineral from deep within the earth, ravaged by black lung disease.

The old folk song “Sixteen Tons” tells that story—of men who rarely saw the sun and whose blood and sweat made coal the major industry in the Black Diamond region until the 1920s.

But those were the “good old days” of coal mining and, fortunately, the industry has undergone radical changes. For one thing, today’s miners work above ground, in the hot summer sun and the cold winter rain.

This Labor Day weekend, Black Diamond looks back at the old days, remembering those pioneers and miners who settled the town. The festivities include the kind of fun and games many pioneer kids enjoyed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 9, 1923

If hard work and persistent effort is worth anything at all, the Black Diamond Mine Rescue and First Aid Team, under the leadership of Capt. B.F. Snook, is going to be a real contender for honors at the big inter-camp meet in Newcastle on August 18. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 5, 1923

Black Diamond was saddened the past week by the accidental deaths of two of the men employed in the mine, Frank Eltz, inside laborer, who met his death on Wednesday, June 27, and Joe Spinks, inside laborer, who followed Eltz over the Divide two days later, Friday, June 29.

Eltz was 37 years of age, born in Austria, March 20, 1886. He came to the United States in 1913, and has been with the Pacific Coast Coal Company since August 1921. He was working in the gangway of the 12th level, north, at 5:30 p.m., when a large piece of rock fell from the roof, killing him instantly. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, July 2, 1898

His defense that the explosion was not a serious one, and that therefore failure to report to the state mine inspector was not a violation of the law, fails to satisfy Justice Frank B. Ingersoll

C.C. Anderson, superintendent of the Franklin coal mine, was bound over to the superior court yesterday afternoon by Justice of the Peace Ingersoll, to answer the charge of failure to report forthwith to the state mine inspector a gas explosion in which two men were alleged to have been seriously injured. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 14, 1930

Company, state, and federal investigators say they are at loss to otherwise explain accident

Sketch of mine disaster—The artist’s sketch shows how the explosion killed seventeen miners in the Carbonado mine. The Douty vein of coal, where the blast occurred, is directly under the town, yet it was not felt on the surface. To reach the Douty workings, miners go down a 600-foot counterbalance to the mine entrance beside the Carbon River, then 800 feet through a rock tunnel, down another counterbalance and along another tunnel to the diggings.

Sketch of mine disaster—The artist’s sketch shows how the explosion killed seventeen miners in the Carbonado mine. The Douty vein of coal, where the blast occurred, is directly under the town, yet it was not felt on the surface. To reach the Douty workings, miners go down a 600-foot counterbalance to the mine entrance beside the Carbon River, then 800 feet through a rock tunnel, down another counterbalance and along another tunnel to the diggings.

Death, flying through a section of the Carbonado coal mine on a spark, carefully locked away from human knowledge the real cause of the disaster which Saturday evening killed seventeen miners.

Company, state, federal, and miners’ representatives today had been unable to explain the tragedy. There were no survivors. Every man who might have given a clue was killed. Other workers were too far from the Douty seam where the blast occurred, to give an explanation. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 13, 1930

Miners on third level of Pacific Coast Coal Company’s workings victims of searing detonation

Twenty-two coal miners were reportedly killed in an explosion and rock slide in the Pacific Coast Company mine at Carbonado in central Pierce County, 34 miles southeast of Tacoma, last evening.

Eighteen bodies had been recovered at 11 o’clock last night, and rescue crews were working frantically to find the other entombed men.

The explosion was the worst tragedy in a coal mine in Washington State in many years. (more…)

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