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Posts Tagged ‘mine accidents’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 5, 1925

Every concern is on the lookout for good men and that is why you seldom hear a good man complaining about not getting enough salary. When the firm he is with fails to pay him all his services are worth someone else is going to come along and do it. — Coleman Cox. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 29, 1925

Few coal camps in the country can boast of a wash house comparable with the splendid structure erected for that purpose in Carbonado. Of brick and hollow tile construction, with full cement floors, the building is modern throughout and equipped with every device for the comfort and convenience of the men.

Adding to its attractiveness is a neat lawn with ornamental flower beds in front of the building. A portion of the wing to the left is devoted to canteen purposes, providing pool tables and a stock of confectionery and tobacco for the men of the camp. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 22, 1925

One of the greatest assets which any community can possess is a fine school. In this particular Newcastle ranks with the best and every citizen of the camp is proud of the fact. There is the very finest co-operation between the teaching staff and the Parent-Teacher Association which serves to keep both pupils and parents interested in the school’s welfare and advancement.

The view shown herewith was taken some time ago, when the youngsters were enjoying the sunshine of the noon hour. Prof. M.M. Richardson is the principal of the school, teaching the 7th and 8th grades. Mrs. Richardson teaches the 5th and 6th grades, Miss the 3rd and 4th, and Mrs. R.R. Sterling the primary grades. There are approximately 110 pupils enrolled. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 15, 1925

One of the first structures in Carbonado to catch the eye of the visitor is that of the company store. Of brick construction, it houses the general merchandise store and meat market, while in the rear is situated the mine office. Manager C.T. Paulson and his staff are always ready to see that the wants of every customer are promptly satisfied. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 8, 1925

“ATTRACTIVE SIGN BOARD: Occupying a conspicuous position on North Wenatchee Avenue, directly in front of the yards of the Wenatchee branch of Pacific Coast Coal Co., is a big illuminated billboard which bears the catchy slogan, ‘A BLACK business but we treat you WHITE.’ Manager H.H. Boyd is the author of this slogan, and the volume of business handled though the Wenatchee yard testifies to the fact that Boyd lives up to his statement.” – Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 8, 1925

Occupying a conspicuous position on North Wenatchee Avenue, directly in front of the yards of the Wenatchee branch of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, is a big illuminated billboard which bears the catchy slogan, “A BLACK business but we treat you WHITE.”

Manager H.H. Boyd is the author of this slogan, and the volume of business handled through the Wenatchee yard testifies to the fact that Boyd lives up to his statement. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 30, 1925

Old Black Diamond Mine No. 11, deepest colliery in the United States, is scene of fatal ‘bump’

Two men lost their lives and three others were imprisoned for eight hours before being released by a rescue crew following a cave-in that occurred in the old Black Diamond Mine No. 11 at Black Diamond yesterday afternoon.

The dead are W.R. Brunner, 36, years old, and Emilo Piquet, 35, both of Black Diamond.

Eight men were working in the vicinity of the cave-in. In addition to the two who lost their lives, three were imprisoned by the slide and three escaped without assistance. The six who were rescued or escaped were H.R. Algee, Walter Faulkner, Ben Davis, Walter Remus, E.M. Anthony, and George Belt. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 24, 1913

Blast in Black Diamond Mine, of unknown origin, kills workman—his fellows in serious condition

Violation of rules suspected as cause: Required precautions observed by Pacific Coast Co., exposed lamp or match thought to blame

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

Jack Jackson was killed and Ned Rossi and Eugene Pelline, miners, were seriously burned in an explosion this morning on the tenth level of No. 14 mine at Black Diamond. (more…)

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