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Posts Tagged ‘mine accidents’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 23, 1910

Blow of pick pours torrent into Occidental Mine No. 3 at Palmer, ruining coal workings

Heroes volunteer to save unlucky workman

George Brinn doomed, if not already dead, despite efforts to reach victim of rising water

Rising on the slope at the rate of eight inches an hour, water from an underground river which was tapped by the pick of George Brinn, a miner, has completely flooded Occidental Mine No. 3 at Palmer, King County, and now stands at ninety feet on the slope. Brinn is missing and doubtless lost his life when the flood descended on him and in the heroic effort of fellow miners to rescue him dead or alive, two of them, Pit Boss William Barringer and Abner Farmer, a miner, just escaped drowning. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, September 23, 1900

Morris Roscia, a coal miner formerly employed by the Black Diamond Coal Mining Company, has commenced an action against the company in the federal court to recover heavy damages for alleged personal injuries.

The plaintiff alleges that on February 21, 1900, he was working for the defendant at a point several hundred feet under the surface, and that there was danger from coal gas. He claims that this fact was well known to the defendant, but that it permitted an open lamp to be brought into the workings, which caused an explosion.

He states that he was blown with great force against a wall of the workings, had both ears blown off, and was seriously injured about the head, so that he will be a cripple for life, and unable to work at his trade. He asks damages in the sum of $15,249.20.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 12, 1924

Summer time in Juneau, Alaska, is not the most favorable season in which to sell coal to the domestic consumer. But the view shown herewith of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Juneau depot, taken in the month of July, shows not a truck in sight. This is because Agent H.G. Walmsley had them all out making deliveries, even though the mid-day sun made a shady corner most inviting. “Walms” was formerly a company employee at Newcastle. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 29, 1924

Making hay while the sun shines is a motto which J.F. Torrence, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company depot at Tacoma, believes in putting into practice.

Consequently, when coal orders slumped during the hot weather of July he fitted up the office with extra typewriters and employed ten young ladies to operate them until a total of 15,000 letters had been written, addressed and mailed, admonishing an equal number of Tacomans to follow the example of the thrifty and and lay in a winter’s supply of fuel before the chill winds of winter found them with empty coal bins.

The influx of orders which followed necessitated the putting on of another truck to make deliveries. (more…)

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By W.D. Reese

Come friends and fellow citizens, come sisters if you will,
A verse or two I’ll sing to you of the dead of Franklin,
On the 24th of August in 1894. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 1, 1924

What more could a girl want than to enjoy the privileges of membership in the Ta-Ta-Pochon Camp Fire of Burnett? Ask any of the young ladies who appear in the group shown herewith and you’ll get an emphatic answer. California’s press agents couldn’t muster a finer bevy of feminine pulchritude in all of Mack Sennett’s legions than Burnett can boast.

From left to right they are: Ida Ellis, Audrey Parry, Margaret Murnan, Alma Johnson, Lee Dora Bumgarner, Mary Jackson, June Vernon, Hazel Miller, and Lee Miller. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, July 31, 2002

By Desiree Lerum
For the Courier-Herald

From his computer terminal at the food bank, Enumclaw’s Roy Dalsanto keeps track of donations and recipients. (Photo by Brenda Sexton.)

From his computer terminal at the food bank, Enumclaw’s Roy Dalsanto keeps track of donations and recipients. (Photo by Brenda Sexton.)

Roy Dalsanto remembers as a young child going to the local church to pick up the bags of flour and sugar his family received on a welfare-type program. His father had been injured while working in the Black Diamond coal mines and the family was short on money.

Because of that, Dalsanto can identify with the people who use the services of the Enumclaw Food Bank that he runs. He enjoys giving people the help they need through the food bank.

“My family needed help and I like to help others,” he said. (more…)

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