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Posts Tagged ‘mining equipment’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 3, 1924

Because of the steep pitch of the main slopes in some of the mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company it is necessary to use covers on the cars in which the coal is hoisted to prevent it being scattered along the slope on the way to the tipple.

In the picture above is shown a new type of cover invented and patented by W.B. Walker of Newcastle. This cover is so designed that it telescopes along the side of the car when not in use. The picture shows the cover folded back and also covering the loaded coal. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 27, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

“We’ve lived in coal revivals since 1915. We have spurts and then, they fall off,” observed John Markus, Sr., proprietor of Ravensdale’s principal place of business, a grocery on the Kent-Kangley Road.

The little community with the euphonious name in South King County’s coal belt is about to have another “spurt,” however. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 23, 1923

Three teams, representing Newcastle, Burnett, and Black Diamond, respectively, contested for honors at the Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet held in Newcastle last Saturday, August 18.

Above, the personnel of all three teams is shown, just prior to beginning the first aid problems. Below, the victorious Black Diamond team and the Du Pont and William M. Barnum cups which they won. Black Diamond’s score in the first aid events was 96.4, and in the mine rescue events, 95, making a combined score of 95.7.

Members of the winning team are: Edw. Hale, D.D. Jones, Capt. B.F. Snook, A.G. Wallace, Jack Nichols and Richard Evered. They leave for Salt Lake City, Friday at 3:30 p.m., to compete in the International First Aid Meet on August 26, 27, and 28. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 19, 1919

Take first place when total average counted—will go to Pittsburgh

A safety mine car invented by Joe Klansnic, circa 1920.

A safety mine car invented by Joe Klansnic, circa 1920.

A team from the Roslyn Fuel Company’s mine at Jonesville won the mine rescue and first aid contest at Black Diamond yesterday and will be sent to Pittsburgh to compete in the national mining competitions September 30 and October 1. The Roslyn team was not a good finished [sic] in the mine rescue work, but was so nearly perfect in first aid work that it overcame the early handicap and finished in front on general average. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 17, 1923

Toonerville trolley

Toonerville trolley

Guided by the accommodating hand of Supt. J.J. Jones, the editor of the Bulletin was conducted through Black Diamond Mine last Friday, May 11, and initiated into the mysteries of digging coal.

Down on the 12th Level, in Chute No. 1, on the South Side, J.D. Walton gave a demonstration of how a pick is used in digging, while up at the face in the gangway some of the boys were busy with a jack hammer, driving the gangway still further along the seam.

At the 11th Level Pete Kurth, cager, was found on the job, busy with the constant string of trips coming and going. Going on up to the 9th, the trip was made on the “Toonerville Trolley”—the auxiliary hoist between the 12th and 7th Levels used until the 12th Level is developed extensively enough to permit the switching of the main trip. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 3, 1923

Around the top works of a mine the greatest noticeable activity is when the shifts are going on and coming off. During the rest of the time the trips come shooting up the shaft with machine-like regularity, discharge their coal cargoes, and drop back down again with little of the human element in evidence.

That those who stay on top might see who’s responsible below for the daily hoist the Bulletin herewith shows one group of the men ready to go underground for the graveyard shift.

Reading from left to right they are: Elmer Landis, Earl Cooper, L.A. Broulette, Tony Pinter (just peeking over Broulette’s shoulder), Ray Ellis, Wm. Holzhauser, Robt. Wallace, Ed. Sawyer, Joe Zeman, Phil Werle, Eli Celich, I.C. Thompson, and Wm. Kelly. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 3, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

About a mile and a quarter southeasterly from Franklin and about the same distance due east from the entrance to the Pacosco Mine, is the Hyde Mine.

The Hyde Mine was originally developed by sinking a slope on Number Twelve Seam, then later a rock tunnel was driven connecting this slope with the well-known McKay Seam. This mine was opened prior to 1909, but was not extensively developed until the McKay Coal Seam was found, which was a year or two later.

Gangways were driven to the north and to the northwest, toward what is now Pacosco Mine, and gangways were also driven to the south along the strikes of both the McKay and the Number Twelve. (more…)

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