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Posts Tagged ‘mining safety’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 6, 1923

During the month of October, when the mines broke all known records in the production of coal, the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Wenatchee depot turned in one of the best months in its history.

The view above shows the yard office at Wenatchee, with George Glann, veteran of 17 years, and the yard foreman, standing near the entrance. H.H. Boyd is the agent at Wenatchee, and his aggressiveness is resulting in the wide distribution of this company’s product throughout that district. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 15, 1923

Surrounded by trees and well removed from the noise and grime of the mine operations, the Pacific Coast Coal Company Hospital at Black Diamond presents the appearance of a well-kept bungalow rather than that of a medical or surgical institution.

A peek into the interior gives another reason why the men who require hospital attention prefer the Black Diamond hospital to any available in Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 25, 1923

Every afternoon, rain or shine, the men who report at the slope to catch the man trip down at 3:30 are always ready to comply with the photographer’s request to stand for a picture. It is with genuine pleasure that the Bulletin herewith presents a sextet of real fellows, a part of the crew which daily does a shift in Black Diamond.

From left to right they are: C.W. Bland, J. Pohorence, L. Raschka, S.E. Bennett, C.P. Capaci (otherwise known as The Sheik), and T. Strigen. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 4, 1923

Indication of the wide-spreading use of Diamond Briquets is seen in the growing demand for this fuel for consumption in the smudge pots of Yakima Valley orchards. Each spring, during the budding and blossoming season, Yakima orchardists strive to save their crops from the ravages of late frosts by the use of smudge pots placed beneath the flower-laden trees. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 20, 1923

Several months ago a considerable shipment of Black Diamond coal was dispatched to points in Alaska and even to scattered government stations up beyond the Arctic Circle. Now the other extreme is reached, with three whalers in this week for bunkers to take them to the Antarctic.

Each of the whalers goes by the name of Star, being also numbered 1, 2, and 3. They loaded Black Diamond and South Prairie steam coal, and will sail from Seattle, via Honolulu and Australia, for the South Polar regions. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 17, 1915

BLACK DIAMOND, Friday, Sept. 17. —A surprise luncheon of fried chicken with all the usual “trimmings” was given here Saturday in honor of the first aid team that will go to San Francisco to represent the Pacific Coast at the nationwide first aid and mine rescue meet to be held at the Panama Pacific Exposition, September 23 and 24.

The luncheon was at the home of Mrs. M.A. Morgan and the hostesses were the wives of the team members, M.A. Morgan, captain; J.S. Murphy, H.P. Phillips, Joseph McDonald, Henry DeWinter, Ray Rank, and J.W. Greggs.

The team leaves for San Francisco on a Pacific Coast Steamship liner today, returning about October 1.

The Black Diamond team won the honor of representing Washington at San Francisco in a Labor Day meet at Black Diamond.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 14, 1923

Chemical discovered during war oxidizes carbon monoxide, making it harmless

For more than two hours yesterday prominent coal miners, superintendents, engineers, foremen, representatives of the State Mine Department, and of the Seattle Fire and Police Departments gathered at the federal mine rescue station at the University of Washington and took part in a demonstration of a new “self rescuer,” or small gas mask which will permit a man to live in air heavily impregnated with deadly monoxide gas from forty minutes to more than an hour.

The demonstration was made in a small room, into which the exhaust of the White mine rescue truck of the government was piped. (more…)

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