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Posts Tagged ‘mining safety’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 9, 1925

Playing together for the first time this season, the soccer football squad at Newcastle has been one of the strong contenders for honors in the state league. The camp has loyally supported the boys and in turn the players have been a credit to the camp. One of the team, Bert Blondell, was chosen to play with the Washington All-Stars in the game against the All-Stars of Victoria, B.C.

In the picture, from left to right standing: Tim Riley, Jack Lucas, Don Campbell, Bert Blondell, Jock Clark, Jim Strang, Bob Gelling, Dave Forbes, Jimmy Walton, Joe Oschberger, and W.S. Hart. In front, left to right: Dan Minele, Bob Miles, C. Mikola, Arthur Kelly, Gus Lapsansky, Ted Jackson, captain of the team, Harold Phillips, Jim McCarthy, “Hen” Roberts. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 26, 1925

Walter Burnum, recently elected president of The Pacific Coast Co.

Walter Burnum, recently elected president of The Pacific Coast Co.

As is generally known among the employees, the Pacific Coast Coal Company is owned and operated by The Pacific Coast Company, of which Mr. Wm. M. Barnum of New York has for many years been president, and Mr. Walter Barnum, treasurer. Mr. E.C. Ward is president of the former and vice-president of the latter. Mr. Walter Barnum has now been elected to the presidency of The Pacific Coast Company, and Mr. Wm. M. Barnum continues as a director of the company and in close association with its affairs.

Both of these Eastern officials have been in Seattle for the past week on their semi-annual visit of inspection, and they will probably remain here until the end of the month. They, with Mr. Ward and other local officials, are visiting each of the mine operations.

The new president is intimately familiar with all of the company’s activities, and enjoys a wide acquaintance among the employees, having been a regular visitor at the mines for many years past. On this, as well as former trips, he has extended his personal inspection into the underground workings of the mines, in the activities of which he takes a keen interest.

He is also closely identified with the larger coal problems of the nation, being vice-president of the National Coal Association which embraces in its membership most of the principal operators of the United States. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 5, 1925

Before sailing from Seattle for the United Kingdom and the Continent this week, the S.S. Oklahoma of the French Line, Compagnie Generale Transatlantique, managed on the Pacific Coast by the General Steamship Corporation, filled her bunkers for the long voyage with steam coal from the Pacific Coast Coal Company. This vessel is one of a fleet of fine steamers owned by the French Line, including the Mississippi, Georgia, and Arizona, all of which ply in the Puget Sound service. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, March 2007

Howard Botts

Howard Botts

Black Diamond is my favorite subject since I’ve lived there all my life. I think these two towns, Maple Valley and Black Diamond, have some things in common; a couple of them are Highway 169 and railroads.

People in Seattle heard that the Northern Pacific was coming to this area and going to Tacoma.

They felt if they couldn’t have that they were going to build their own railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla over the pass. So they started in 1873, got as far as Renton in 1876; then extended it to Newcastle. In 1880 Henry Villard, of the Northern Pacific, bought it from the Black Diamond Coal Company and renamed it the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 26, 1925

Because of ill health Prof. M.M. Richardson, recently principal of the Newcastle Grade School, has resigned and is now taking a much needed rest. Succeeding him as principal is Mrs. R.R. Sterling, who for several years has taught the primary grades of the school.

Miss Winifred Butler, first at the left, teaches the third and fourth grades. Standing next to her is Mrs. Sterling, then Prof. Richardson and Mrs. Richardson, the latter being in charge of the fifth and sixth grades. The seventh and eighth grades are now being taught by Miss Grantham who will complete the retiring principal’s term. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 25, 1923

Medical, military, and industrial units show efficiency in operation

Thrilling rescues and efficient first aid work were demonstrated at The Armory last night, with the Washington National Guard and the King County Medical Society as hosts. 1—Boy Scouts show how to make a stretcher. Left to right, Glen Peterson, Troop 40; Carrol Philips, Troop 41; William Bliss, Troop 40 (on stretcher); Earl Deaner, Troop 40. 2—Maj. George W. Becler examining a trophy. 3—CoIumbus Hospital team, left to right. Miss E. Cassinat. Dr. William C. Speidel, Miss E. Hoover, Mrs. H.H. Ross, Miss K. Bates, Miss P. Campbell. 4—Lieut. Col. Harry Vanderbilt Wurdemann, chief umpire. 5—Lieut. Joseph Salvage, Seattle Fire Department, thinks life-saving is entertaining. The victim is Fireman T. Harden.

Thrilling rescues and efficient first aid work were demonstrated at The Armory last night, with the Washington National Guard and the King County Medical Society as hosts. 1—Boy Scouts show how to make a stretcher. Left to right, Glen Peterson, Troop 40; Carrol Philips, Troop 41; William Bliss, Troop 40 (on stretcher); Earl Deaner, Troop 40. 2—Maj. George W. Beeler examining a trophy. 3—Columbus Hospital team, left to right. Miss E. Cassinat. Dr. William C. Speidel, Miss E. Hoover, Mrs. H.H. Ross, Miss K. Bates, Miss P. Campbell. 4—Lieut. Col. Harry Vanderbilt Wurdemann, chief umpire. 5—Lieut. Joseph Salvage, Seattle Fire Department, thinks life-saving is entertaining. The victim is Fireman T. Harden.

Helmets, miners’ lamps, campaign hats, and nurses’ caps bobbed about in the Armory last night when an interesting exhibit of rescue work and first aid was staged by teams representing medical, military, and industrial organizations. The affair was arranged jointly by the King County Medical Society and the Washington National Guard. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 19, 1925

Tramways and aerial cables are common sights around metal mines, but it’s uncommon to find a coal mine with its entrance 450 feet below the level of the surrounding country. The above view shows the “incline” at Carbonado, a 35-degree pitch, down which all supplies and the daily shifts are lowered and raised.

Carbonado Comments

Carbonado victor in soccer battle

Battling the valiant Newcastle soccer eleven, the Carbonado squad last Sunday put up such a fight that the score ended 4 to 0, with the Carbon lads on the long end. Carbonado played a fast game.

Newcastle put up a fair defense, but with a number of new men, and also handicapped by a recent period of idleness, the Coal Creek team could make little headway against the strong Carbon defense. (more…)

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