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Posts Tagged ‘mining safety’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 19, 1924

Steamships of the Nippon Yusen Kaisha line have been coming into Seattle for more than twenty-five years, in fact, this famous line was the first to establish regular service between Puget Sound ports and the Orient. Recognizing the superior qualities of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal for bunkering purposes, the vessels of the N.Y.K. fleet have frequently coaled at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers.

The accompanying half-tone is a reproduction of a photograph taken of the Shidzuoka Maru while loading 1,000 tons of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal at the company bunkers last week. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 12, 1924

Summer time in Juneau, Alaska, is not the most favorable season in which to sell coal to the domestic consumer. But the view shown herewith of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Juneau depot, taken in the month of July, shows not a truck in sight. This is because Agent H.G. Walmsley had them all out making deliveries, even though the mid-day sun made a shady corner most inviting. “Walms” was formerly a company employee at Newcastle. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 9, 1914

Pete Frederickson, Black Diamond butcher, won the prize for the most handsomely decorated auto.

Pete Frederickson, Black Diamond butcher, won the prize for the most handsomely decorated auto.

That the team entered by the local miners’ union was victorious in the mine rescue and first aid meet held in Black Diamond on Labor Day, defeating the fire bosses’ team organized by the mine operators, is the report to Seattle by William Short, state district secretary of the United Mine Workers, who served as master of ceremonies at Black Diamond’s celebration of the holiday. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 22, 1924

Rendering everything from classic selections and overtures to modern waltzes and jazz numbers, the Newcastle Band provided a musical program of exceptional excellence at the Western Washington Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet in Carbonado.

Under the able direction of Bandmaster Archie Johnson the Newcastle Band is much in demand at all social events in the camp. This picture shows the band playing on the field at Carbonado. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 8, 1924

Everywhere in the mines of Western Washington, and particularly in the mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, there is much stress placed on safety work. As a result the number of serious accidents is kept down to a minimum.

This scene shows the precautions taken to support the roof while the miner operates the “slugger” in undercutting the coal. As he prefers not to reveal his identity, we leave it to you to guess the name of this “Safety First” miner. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 1, 1924

What more could a girl want than to enjoy the privileges of membership in the Ta-Ta-Pochon Camp Fire of Burnett? Ask any of the young ladies who appear in the group shown herewith and you’ll get an emphatic answer. California’s press agents couldn’t muster a finer bevy of feminine pulchritude in all of Mack Sennett’s legions than Burnett can boast.

From left to right they are: Ida Ellis, Audrey Parry, Margaret Murnan, Alma Johnson, Lee Dora Bumgarner, Mary Jackson, June Vernon, Hazel Miller, and Lee Miller. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Times, July 26, 1920

Will compete for state honors in rescue and first aid work

About 350 heroes, worthy of a Tennyson but now only everyday heroes, will assemble at Roslyn Saturday, August 14, to compete for state honors in mine rescue and first aid contests. British Columbia also has been invited to send teams, and the 15 first aid ten mine rescue teams from mines throughout Washington may be augmented. (more…)

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