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Posts Tagged ‘mining safety’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 15, 1925

One of the first structures in Carbonado to catch the eye of the visitor is that of the company store. Of brick construction, it houses the general merchandise store and meat market, while in the rear is situated the mine office. Manager C.T. Paulson and his staff are always ready to see that the wants of every customer are promptly satisfied. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 8, 1925

“ATTRACTIVE SIGN BOARD: Occupying a conspicuous position on North Wenatchee Avenue, directly in front of the yards of the Wenatchee branch of Pacific Coast Coal Co., is a big illuminated billboard which bears the catchy slogan, ‘A BLACK business but we treat you WHITE.’ Manager H.H. Boyd is the author of this slogan, and the volume of business handled though the Wenatchee yard testifies to the fact that Boyd lives up to his statement.” – Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 8, 1925

Occupying a conspicuous position on North Wenatchee Avenue, directly in front of the yards of the Wenatchee branch of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, is a big illuminated billboard which bears the catchy slogan, “A BLACK business but we treat you WHITE.”

Manager H.H. Boyd is the author of this slogan, and the volume of business handled through the Wenatchee yard testifies to the fact that Boyd lives up to his statement. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 19, 1924

Olaf Bodding, of the Bodding Transfer Co., Juneau, Alaska, is here seen with his team, ready to deliver a ton of Black Diamond screened coal, sacked, to a customer who lives half way up the mountain. That the problem of delivering coal in Juneau, especially half way up the mountain, is somewhat different than might be supposed, is seen in the fact that to deliver this ton of coal the cost to the customer for delivery alone is $6, to say nothing of the cost of the coal itself.

Black Diamond coal and Diamond Briquets are both popular fuels in Juneau, according to H.G. Walmsley, agent for the Pacific Coast Coal Company there. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 12, 1924

This trade-mark of the Pacific Coast Coal Company or some modification of it, has been proposed as the ideal design for an emblem to be worn by members and past-members of the Mine and Central councils.

Ideas on the proper type of pin to be designed may be submitted for approval at the next meeting of the Central Council, December 27. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 21, 1924

Thanksgiving Day is distinctly American. If those who established this institution had not been truly grateful to Divine Providence for the meager store of provisions wrung from a barren shore and hostile land, would we today who dwell in abundance have cause to render homage to the Pilgrim’s God?

It is for us, then, not to raise our voices in paeans of praise for the lavish blessings in which we revel today, but rather, to be humbly grateful for the heritage of Thanksgiving. Thus the nation today can sing its grateful praise to Him who guided the footsteps of that freedom-loving band who bequeathed to us America! (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 7, 1924

Newcastle has always enjoyed the reputation of having one of the finest club organizations in existence among the employees of the Pacific Coast Coal Company. Naturally then, it would be expected that they would possess a fine home.

That such is the case can be seen from the half-tone shown herewith which gives a fair idea of the commodious quarters occupied by the club. In the rear is a hall in which dances are held, and which is equipped also with a ladies’ rest room, check room, and kitchen. The front of the building is utilized by the club for its card and pool tables. “Hen” Roberts is manager of the club. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 24, 1924

Situated one block east of the main highway which runs through Burnett is the cozy little home of Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Hultquist. The front yard of their place, surrounded by a neat picket fence, is one of the show spots of the camp. Its mass of flowering plants and shrubs, with climbing vines and grassy lawn forming a verdant background, presents a pleasing scene indeed. In the picture, which cannot possibly do justice to the beauty of the scene, there is shown the word “Burnett” formed from growing shrubs, behind which is a luxuriant growth of bright blossoms.

Hultquist is an American citizen and a timberman in Burnett Mine. He came to the camp on January 10, 1922, formerly having worked in Tacoma, and in the mines of Cripple Creek, Leadville, and Aspen, Colorado. (more…)

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