Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Mining the Memories’

Originally published in the Pacific Northwest Post Card Club newsletter, July, August, September 2018

By JoAnne Matsumura and Ed Weum

Located in the booming coal mining town of Black Diamond during the early 1900s was a candy store owned by John and Lizzie Davies.

It was the hangout for many of the town’s children and a source of great pleasure. Many a child could be seen staring in the window clutching a coin with great anticipation.

These were times when a penny actually bought something and the first individually wrapped penny candy, the Tootsie Roll was a top seller.

Also among the treats were Root Beer Barrel Rolls, Banana Chews, Black Sam-bos, Jaw Beakers and Licorice Whips. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 21, 1986

By Herb Belanger

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Tough old coal-mining towns like Black Diamond always have had their share of characters, but the “Flying Frog” is one of Carl Steiert’s favorites.

The “Frog” actually was a Belgian named Emile Raisin who ran a taxi service between Black Diamond, a company town with one bar, and Ravensdale, which had 10 saloons where miners quenched the thirst they developed toiling underground. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 1, 1923

Central Council 1923

From left to right, first row: R.C. Robinson, Supt. J.J. Jones, A.E. Holden, Glen Clancy, H.G. Walmsley. Second row: Supt. M.A. Morgan, Supt. Robt. Simpson, Ward Harris, Frank Connell, Elmer Fitzgerald, Verald Eberhart. Third row: T.H. Cadwell, John C. Ritchie, P.N. Kurth, Robt. Miles, W.F. Osbourne, E.G. Osterholm. Back row: A. Booth, Reese Griffiths, Frank Eddy, Supt. Paul Gallagher, A.W. Gray, L.W. Foreman, H.M. Irelan.

Last Saturday the Central Council of the Pacific Coast Coal Company met and celebrated its first anniversary by having its picture taken. On February 25, 1922, was held the first meeting of the Central Council. Of that group but two of the employee representatives, John C. Ritchie and Frank Connell, were present at the meeting last Saturday, February 24.

As a picture of the first Central Council appeared in the Bulletin under date of March 1, 1922, it seems very fitting that on this March 1, 1923, there should appear a picture of the Central Council of today. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 25, 2014

By Bill Kombol

This bridge is a rare and intact example of the Baltimore-Petit deck truss design, the only such structure owned and maintained by King County. The bridge was designated as a Landmark Bridge in 2004.

This bridge is a rare and intact example of the Baltimore-Petit deck truss design, the only such structure owned and maintained by King County. The bridge was designated as a Landmark Bridge in 2004.

The high bridge spanning the Green River Gorge, a famed and scenic site located between Cumberland and Black Diamond, was built in 1915. The bridge, now a single-lane design, is still in service nearly 100 years later. It was built to connect the Green River Gorge Road west of the river with the Enumclaw-Franklin Road to the east. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Left uppercut did the work in the fourteenth round—A good contest

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 30, 1904,

Mighty Jimmy Sullivan, boxer, surrounded by Sheriff Bob Hodge, Harry Gwin, and an unknown companion (Black Diamond: Mining the Memories, page 178).

Mighty Jimmy Sullivan, boxer, surrounded by Sheriff Bob Hodge, Harry Gwin, and an unknown companion (Black Diamond: Mining the Memories, page 178).

BLACK DIAMOND, Aug. 29—James L. Sullivan, the Welsh cyclone, knocked out John Loyd, the Colorado whirlwind, in the fourteenth round of one of the best glove contests ever pulled off here.

Sullivan appeared to have the fight well in hand from start to finish. Loyd was game and stood up before Sullivan in a manner which puts him on a par with Sharkey and Kid Carter for taking punishment.

The end came suddenly in the middle of the fourteenth round, when Sullivan landed a left uppercut, displacing some of Loyd’s teeth and scoring a clean knockout.

Considerable money changed hands on the fight, many of the spectators betting that Loyd would stay fifteen rounds.

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, October 2001

By Gordon and Conrad “Coke” Roberts

[We were two young fellows happy to be a part of Black Diamond’s history and would like to share out thoughts and happiness of the times with you and the town!]

The show hall is on the right, the pool hall on the left, and the depot/museum is at the far left, circa 1900.

The show hall is on the right, the pool hall is on the left, and the depot/museum is at the far left, circa 1900.

What a great, little happy town to grow up in! It had everything: good schools, theatre, entertainment, great friends, churches, lodges, gardening, community affairs, and a rich tradition in sporting events. You can believe the Victor G. Roberts family participated in all of it.

In reading Black Diamond: Mining the Memories, I missed any recall of what it was like to live on state highway 169, which was the main thoroughfare through Black Diamond, as it wound from Renton, Maple Valley, Henry’s Switch, and on through Green River Gorge or over the new bridge to Enumclaw. We lived on this main drag, just north of the ball park, with such neighbors as the Fowlers, Merryfields, Tonkins, McDowells, Rhodes, and McTurks.

In my youth my real heroes were my teachers, such as Miss McNamara, Miss Helen Hathaway, Mr. Gildo Rey, Mr. Edson, and of course Mr. J.W. Norman. Above all though stood a very special one, who was the energetic, leader of our community, Mr. Henry Babb. It seemed to the kids he ran the whole town and was special in providing we kids with theatre, movies, sports, education … YES, everything we wanted. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, February 2001

By Dee Israel

This picture is of Ruth Ayers Hofto with the two paintings that she made and donated to the museum, and  were raffled at the Welsh Day Celebration June 9, 2001.

This picture is of Ruth Ayers Hofto with the two paintings that she made and donated to the museum, and were raffled at the Welsh Day Celebration June 9, 2001.

Ruth Ayers Hofto was born in Black Diamond on May 13, 1910, as Vivian Ruth Ayers. She was the daughter of George and Jane Dunn Ayers.

George Ayers was an orphan, born and raised in the area of Sacramento, California. When George was about 4, his father (a Civil War veteran), was hit by a train and killed while working for the Southern Pacific Railroad. He was then raised by an uncle until he could make a living for himself. At about age 14, George began working in the mines. George heard that miners were needed in Black Diamond, Washington, and that there was a great baseball team there. With his experience in the mines, and since he was a very good baseball player, George traveled north to Black Diamond. He joined the team and was one of the more valuable players. He also did some boxing. There are several pictures of George Ayers on display at the museum. Some of the pictures are as he is refereeing boxing and some with his baseball uniform. He is also pictured a few times in Mining The Memories. George lived in the hotel in Black Diamond. That is where he met Jane Dunn as she was working in the hotel. In 1908 George and Jane Dunn were married. (more…)

Read Full Post »