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Posts Tagged ‘Morganville’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 10, 2015

By Kathleen Kear

Black Diamond resident Joe Androsko (right) took former Fire Chief Keith Timm (left) for a joy ride down memory lane in the Black Diamond Fire Department’s first fire engine—a 1947 Ford Howard-Cooper (rededicated in July 2014 during Miners Day)—to Black Diamond’s fire station. Photo by Kevin Esping.

What could be more fun than warm sunny weather in January? How about a ride in one of Black Diamond’s first fire engines, a 1947 Ford Howard-Cooper, with former Black Diamond Fire Chief Keith B. Timm?

Several weeks ago, Joe Androsko, Black Diamond resident and project manager of the 1947 Ford Howard-Cooper fire engine restoration project, went to pick up former Black Diamond Fire Chief Keith Timm and thereafter went for a joy ride down memory lane in the engine. Although Timm served as a Black Diamond firefighter from 1948-1976 before the engine came to town, he remembered fires being fought with a hose cart that had to be pulled around from one fire to another. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 30, 2007

By Kathleen Kear

Getting ready to celebrate her 100th birthday is Ruby Favro Androsko Keeney (left). Also pictured with Keeney is son, Joe Androsko (center), and husband, Lee (right).

Looking forward to celebrating her first century of life, former Black Diamond resident Ruby Favro Androsko Keeney has plenty of tales to share about growing up in Black Diamond.

Born on February 4, 1907, to father, Joe Favro (a Black Diamond coal miner), and mother, Mary (a stay-at-home mom), Keeney grew up to become one of thirteen Black Diamond High School graduates in the class of 1926. Soon after graduation, she went to work at the Black Diamond Bakery. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, January 25, 1989

Fire Chief John Bukoskey provided the Black Diamond City Council with a blueprint peek at Fire District 17’s planned support fire station in the Lake Sawyer area at its regular council meeting Thursday.

The 3,700-square-foot support station, which will be built with a $500,000 bond issue voters approved in September, is scheduled for ground breaking in February and completion sometime in the fall.

The 22-man joint volunteer fire department—Black Diamond and King County District 17—covers an 18-square-mile radius and responds to the Black Diamond, Green River Gorge, Flaming Geyser, and Lake Sawyer areas. The planned low-maintenance, brick building will provide facilities for firefighters the current small station in Black Diamond cannot supply, like a classroom, kitchen, hose tower, and living space for a resident firefighter. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, March 2007

Howard Botts

Howard Botts

Black Diamond is my favorite subject since I’ve lived there all my life. I think these two towns, Maple Valley and Black Diamond, have some things in common; a couple of them are Highway 169 and railroads.

People in Seattle heard that the Northern Pacific was coming to this area and going to Tacoma.

They felt if they couldn’t have that they were going to build their own railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla over the pass. So they started in 1873, got as far as Renton in 1876; then extended it to Newcastle. In 1880 Henry Villard, of the Northern Pacific, bought it from the Black Diamond Coal Company and renamed it the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 27, 1974

By D’Ann Pedee

It’s a family affair—but not the Bob, Carol, Ted, and Alice type.

“A Family Affair” is a leather goods and handcraft shop in the heart of Morganville—the small suburb of Black Diamond reached by turning right at the Black Diamond coal car.

Once you’ve found it, you’ll be glad you used the gas if you’re at all interested in handmade leather items.

Helen Reid, her son, Jack, and two daughters all have a hand in creating and custom designing belts, wallets, handbags, hair ornaments—anything that can be made of leather. They have accepted personalized projects ranging from police belts to dog and cat collars and will soon be able to do tack items such as harnesses. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, August 1999

By Lynda Maks

My father, Joseph Dal Santo, was born in 1885 in Sehio, Italy, and came to the U.S. around 1911. My mother, Anna Respleux, was born in 1896, in Wilkeson, Washington. They met at a boarding house in Black Diamond, which was run by my mother’s aunt and uncle, Joe and Mary Favro. They were married in August of 1914.

They had 8 children: Jules was born in 1916 in BD, Angeline (1917) in Cle Elum, and Alice (1918) in BD, who passed away with the flu in 1919. They then moved to Renton where they had Lynda (1920), Leo (1922), John (1924), and Joe (1925). They moved back to Black Diamond in 1930 so my dad could work for Pacific Coast Coal Company—you had to live in Black Diamond and live in their houses to work for them. You all know the song, “You Owe Your Soul to the Company Store”—that’s the way it was. My brother Roy was born in 1931. (more…)

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Originally published in Valley Living, October 9, 1987

By Peggy Ziebarth
Valley Living Editor

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

“Every time an old house goes, a part of me goes with it,” says Dan Palmer, shuffling through a stack of photographs of historic landmarks scattered over the Valley.

“I can take it when nature takes them, but when it’s the bulldozers…,” Palmer’s voice softens in regret.

Palmer, a folk musician and craftsman by trade, really started getting serious about Valley history when he moved to Black Diamond. And as his interest grew, he started accumulating articles and books on the area’s roots and mounting his own collection of photographs of buildings still standing and the overgrown remnants of a boisterous coal mining past. (more…)

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