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Posts Tagged ‘Morganville’

Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Spring 2013

By Ken Jensen

A business sign means more than just hanging out the proverbial “shingle.” There’s always a story.

Case in point. On the cover we find the KoernersJohn and Walt—posing in front of their drug store in 1925. One of the signs on the building is for United Cigar Stores Co.

Turns out that cigar franchise was a real boon for the Koerners—and for Black Diamond, too—as John Koerner reported in the September 1922 Pacific Coast Bulletin. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 3, 1979

By Dianne Wilson

Quiet elegance, country charm, and comfortable atmosphere can all be used to describe The Dinner House, Black Diamond’s answer to the restaurant needs of the area. For the first time diners can enjoy a good meal in pleasant surroundings without driving a distance.

Last week my son Eric and I responded to the claim of “only the best.” Former patrons of Morganville Tavern would not recognize the place. Walls and ceilings are a warm, deep rose-red. Antique lovers will appreciate the authentic tables and chairs, interspersed with quality pieces including a lonely old sideboard and a china closet with beveled glass, as well as old-style bric-a-brac. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, September 2, 1958

A plaque was placed on a cement-encased stump in a field near Black Diamond yesterday, commemorating it as the rallying point where 200 miners met May 15, 1907, and organized Local 2257, United Mine Workers of America. Albert Donati, president of Local 6487, placed the plaque. Standing on the stump were, from left, Fred Roberts, Sam Nicholls, and William C. Lewis. Roberts and Lewis signed their names to the charter on the stump the day the local was founded. Nicholls is president of District 10, United Mine Workers.

A plaque was placed on a cement-encased stump in a field near Black Diamond yesterday, commemorating it as the rallying point where 200 miners met May 15, 1907, and organized Local 2257, United Mine Workers of America. Albert Donati, president of Local 6487, placed the plaque. Standing on the stump were, from left, Fred Roberts, Sam Nicholls, and William C. Lewis. Roberts and Lewis signed their names to the charter on the stump the day the local was founded. Nicholls is president of District 10, United Mine Workers.

A decaying tree stump in a field near Black Diamond was the rallying point for miners of the area yesterday during the annual Labor Day celebration.

The old stump, now encased in cement, was the spot where 200 miners met on May 15, 1907, to organize Local 2257, United Mine Workers of America. (more…)

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Original published in the Voice of the Valley, September 16, 1998

By Cecilia Nguyen

With the slogan ‘Read to Succeed’ Black Diamond Library advertises the importance of literacy courtesy of Black Diamond Librarian Laverne Harris’ Friendly Acres Horse Farm.

With the slogan ‘Read to Succeed’ Black Diamond Library advertises the importance of literacy courtesy of Black Diamond Librarian Laverne Harris’ Friendly Acres Horse Farm.

Black Diamond is known for its coal mining history. Part of that history included strained labor relations between coal miners and mine operators.

In 1907, at the “Union Stump,” in the area in town known as Morganville, mine workers voted to unify. From that day on, coal miners gradually began to see working conditions and benefits improve for the thousands of men who flocked to the coal mines for wages. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 2, 2003

By Kathleen Kear

Members of the Black Diamond Museum putting finishing touches on their ‘train’ float for the parade. (L-R) Don Mason, Dorothy & Howard Betts, and Dee Israel.

Members of the Black Diamond Museum putting finishing touches on their ‘train’ float for the parade. (L-R) Don Mason, Dorothy & Howard Betts, and Dee Israel.

Steeping in rich memories of yesteryear is the City of Black Diamond with its numerous parades, picnics, games and family activities, which were held in the city not only on Labor Day, but also the Fourth of July.

This Labor Day weekend, August 30–September 1, 2003, the City of Black Diamond once again celebrated with family and friends the final weekend marking the end of summer vacation and the start of school. It also honored the memory of the many men and women who worked hard in shaping Black Diamond to what it has become today.

As part of the weekend celebration, there was a parade, any number of games, a teen dance, barbecue dinner, pancake breakfast, car show, and a number of other activities geared for the whole family to enjoy.

Although recent memory identifies the time of celebration with family and friends with the Labor Day weekend, moving back to the turn of the century put the gathering of family and friends at the Fourth of July. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 10, 1978

By Dianne Wilson

Civil War picture—before and after restoration by Frank Shay.

Civil War picture—before and after restoration by Frank Shay.

Talented. Creative. Artistic. Professional. These adjectives only begin to describe the many abilities of Frank and Irene Shay of Shay’s Photography and Printing. The Shays live and work in Morganville in cluttered simplicity with their two “dumped” dogs and their 13-year-old cat, Sydney.

Frank and Irene have an impressive record as photographers and printers as well as an international reputation for restoring old pictures. (more…)

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Maple Valley Historical Society, March 1987

Here’s where me and the railroad got together.

My brother went up to Maple Valley for some reason or other and saw this gang of railroad men working to save the track that was being washed out. Being nosy, he went up to the foreman and asked if they were hiring anybody and he said yes, and get anyone else you can.

He came home and got me and we started work filling gunny sacks with sand at 4:00 p.m. and didn’t stop til 4:00 p.m. the next day. The rain never let up and gunny sacks got hard to get because everyone else needed them too for the same reason we did. We wound up using sacks that had been filled with rock salt and the salt cut our hands making them very sore. We didn’t have the little bags they use nowadays but the 100-pound size which we about two-thirds filled. (more…)

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