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Posts Tagged ‘Mount Rainier’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 11, 1926

Not only does the Black Diamond Band appeal to the ear with its melodies and martial airs, but the boys present a striking appearance in their natty new uniforms as well. This picture is published that those who heard the Black Diamond Band over the radio recently may know that they are an attractively garbed organization. Frank Carroll, director of the band, is a musician of years of experience and organizer of the famed Bellingham Elks’ Band. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 4, 1926

Editors and publishers of approximately 100 newspapers in the State of Washington were the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Newcastle and the Briquet Plant, last Saturday. This excursion was the closing feature of the Fourteenth Annual Newspaper Institute of the Washington Press Association.

The picture shows the group ready to board the special train after having made a trip into the Primrose Seam, a mile and a quarter into the heart of the mountain, from whence comes the famous Newcastle coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, February 1, 1999

Officials say no, but residents appeal for signal on busy SR-169

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

Students from Black Diamond Elementary School cross busy Highway 169 at Baker Street after school Friday. Highway planners propose a yellow flashing light for use only when school children are coming and going. But residents insist traffic has grown to the point that a stoplight is needed for pedestrian safety. (Marcus R. Donner/Journal)

BLACK DIAMOND — Lorianne Taff rarely allows her 10-year-old son to cross State Route 169 by himself to get candy at the Cenex station.

Only recently did she give her 13-year-old son, a junior high student, permission to negotiate the usually busy two-lane highway that bisects this small rural town.

As a mother, a Black Diamond resident, and an Enumclaw School Board member, Taff worries about the highway and its growing traffic. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 23, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The town of Fairfax, declared the “prettiest mining town around,” showing the turn-table at the extreme right above center. Mine buildings are in front and the school is on the left. Carbon River runs through the trees at the top or the photo. (Original copy from Mr. and Mrs. Tony Basselli.) Photo courtesy of Steve Meitzler, Heritage Quest Press, Orting, WA., publisher of the book, Carbon River Coal Country.

Riding the Northern Pacific Railroad to the upper end of the Carbon River Canyon or tooling along to Mount Rainier in a Model T, tourists would pass close to three mining towns: Melmont, Fairfax, and Montezuma.

First, beyond Carbonado, was Melmont, situated between the Carbon River and the NPR line. A bridge spanning the Carbon River ran between the company hotel and the saloon with the depot and school on the hillside above. On the left end of the bridge was the road connecting to Fairfax. This bridge was nearly a little beyond the high bridge which spans the canyon today. (more…)

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Originally published in The News Tribune, January 10, 2000

BLACK DIAMOND — The rural community of Black Diamond, a former mining town with a majestic view of Mount Rainier, could become an example of the latest concept in retirement living if a California development company gets its way.

The town is Sacramento-based Jenamar Co.’s first choice for a $100 million rural retirement village for active adults. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 22, 1925

Prosperous town on Naches Pass Highway surrounded by rich agricultural, timber, and mineral lands, is boasting of rapid development

New mill of the White River Lumber Company on the White River, three miles from Enumclaw.

One of the earliest settlements in that part of the state and the only place of that name in the United States, Enumclaw, forty miles southeast of Seattle, is one of the biggest little towns in the West.

Early history and distinctive name, however, are not Enumclaw’s only claims for attention. Thought its early growth was slow, Enumclaw today is counted one of the most prosperous towns in the Puget Sound region. Rich agricultural land, timber, and mineral surround it. It is on the Naches Pass highway, the most direct route between Seattle and the west entrance to Mount Rainier Nation Park. It is the gateway to unlimited scenic attractions, fishing, and hunting grounds. Backup up against the Cascade foothills, Enumclaw is within two hours’ drive of perpetual snow on one side and the waters of Puget Sound on the other. (more…)

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Originally published in Carbon River Heritage, July 1986

Photo by Nancy Irene Hall

June 22, 1986, the Tacoma Model T Club posed at the Wilkeson Arch to commemorate its 60th anniversary. The cars used were 1926 models. The beautiful historic arch was given to the town of Wilkeson on July 2, 1926, by the Wilkeson Booster Club.

The present day Wilkeson Booster Club is planning to recrown her soon with a new cedar log. It cost $2,000 to build it originally and all the money was raised by the Wilkeson Boosters. It was made of Wilkeson Sandstone quarried just a few miles from the site on which the arch now stands. For 60 years everyone going to the Carbon River entrance to Mount Rainier has passed under this grand monument. (more…)

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