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Posts Tagged ‘Mount Rainier’

Originally published in Carbon River Heritage, July 1986

Photo by Nancy Irene Hall

June 22, 1986, the Tacoma Model T Club posed at the Wilkeson Arch to commemorate its 60th anniversary. The cars used were 1926 models. The beautiful historic arch was given to the town of Wilkeson on July 2, 1926, by the Wilkeson Booster Club.

The present day Wilkeson Booster Club is planning to recrown her soon with a new cedar log. It cost $2,000 to build it originally and all the money was raised by the Wilkeson Boosters. It was made of Wilkeson Sandstone quarried just a few miles from the site on which the arch now stands. For 60 years everyone going to the Carbon River entrance to Mount Rainier has passed under this grand monument. (more…)

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Originally published in the King County Journal, June 2001

Workers harvesting leeks at the Mosby Brothers Farm near Black Diamond on a sunny winter day.

Workers harvesting leeks at the Mosby Brothers Farm near Black Diamond on a sunny winter day.

Black Diamond is a small town located 35 miles southeast of Seattle, east of Auburn, and south of Maple Valley. It was established more than 100 years ago when a wealth of coal was discovered. The town’s name came from the Black Diamond Coal Company of California, which began mining in the area in the 1880s. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 5, 1924

This is the portal marking the main entrance to the coal mining camp of Carbonado, recently acquired by the Pacific Coast Coal Company. The camp is beautifully situated on the Carbon River, just off the main road to the Carbon Glacier on the north slope of majestic Mt. Rainier. Carbonado is approximately 50 miles from Seattle, on the Northern Pacific Railway, the tracks of which appear in the foreground. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 22, 1924

Rendering everything from classic selections and overtures to modern waltzes and jazz numbers, the Newcastle Band provided a musical program of exceptional excellence at the Western Washington Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet in Carbonado.

Under the able direction of Bandmaster Archie Johnson the Newcastle Band is much in demand at all social events in the camp. This picture shows the band playing on the field at Carbonado. (more…)

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Originally published in Carbon River Heritage newsletter, July 1986

by Nancy Irene Hall

James L. Brummett, ex-Coast Guard officer-turned trapper, fisherman, and hunter. Jim posing with some of his furs on the dock of his Double Rainbow Lake Resort located just 2 miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnon exit. (Photo by Nancy Irene Hall.)

James L. Brummett, ex-Coast Guard officer-turned trapper, fisherman, and hunter. Jim posing with some of his furs on the dock of his Double Rainbow Lake Resort located just 2 miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnon exit. (Photo by Nancy Irene Hall.)

The site of the old coal mine town once called South Willis lies just a few miles east of Wilkeson on the Quinnion exit. It is now the home of Double Rainbow Resort, a 25-acre resort run by James L. Brummett. This land has seen many changes since its coal mining days.

It was named after the Northern Pacific Railroad’s young geologist Bailey Willis, who did the coal explorations for their Northern Transcontinental Survey in 1881–1884. After his explorations he gave his account of the coal in the Wilkeson, South Willis, Carbonado area in a paper entitled “Report of the Coal Fields of Washington Territory.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 22, 1923

One week from today, Thanksgiving Day, there is promised a royal feed at each of the camps when the dinner gong sounds at the hotels.

In common with all Americans the custom of dining on the toothsome turkey will hold full sway. Judging from the array of savory viands listed on the Thanksgiving menu there is going to be plenty to go round with a second helping for everybody.

At Newcastle plans are already well under way by Chef Geo. W. Blake and his corps of able assistants, and when the big day arrives there is certain to be a crowd of hungry diners ready to start the chorus of “Please pass the turkey.”

Chef Emil Bernhard at Burnett believes not only in preparing a feast for the inner man but he invariably accompanies it with a feast of beauty for the eye, and his tables promise to be groaning with the weight of good things.

At Black Diamond the hotel diners are anxiously awaiting the spread which Chef J.P. Whelan has in store, which all agree will be complete from soup to nuts. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 26, 1910

Period of greatest danger passed, through spectacular and successful work of fighting forces

Departments conflict on firing great guns

William Entwistle’s force risks death in mad race to Maple Valley with auto load of dynamite

The forest fire story in brief

Two bad fires break out near standing timber reserves, King County. Forest supervisors take 200 men into woods but fail to control conflagrations.

Blaze in young timber near Scenic Hot Springs breaks all bounds and is beyond control. Forest supervisor in charge.

Town of Walsh, on Columbia & Puget Sound, badly scorched, loss including one saloon, two-story dwelling house, barn, and buildings of England’s logging camp.

Dynamite to the amount of 500 pounds taken into Maple Valley district by fire fighters, who prepare to dynamite tops of trees in old timber to stop destructive fires.

Cooler weather makes work of forest fire workers easier, but danger will continue until rains fall.

The town of Bothell, at the head of Lake Washington, which was in danger of destruction yesterday, is reported safe. No buildings were destroyed. (more…)

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