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Posts Tagged ‘Muckleshoot’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, March 11, 1998

Tacoma utility, state ecology agency reach agreement

By Paul Schmidt
The Courier-Herald

After trying to circumvent legal roadblocks through the state Legislature, Black Diamond is in line to receive some of the water needed for future growth.

A tentative agreement in principle reached recently outside Olympia between Tacoma Public Utilities, the state Department of Ecology, and the City of Black Diamond could provide 500,000 gallons per day for five to 10 years. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 11, 1998

By Cecilia Nguyen

Due to the potential impact the Muckleshoot Reservation amphitheater will have on the City of Black Diamond’s traffic, a resolution requesting the Army Corps of Engineers perform an environmental impact study that includes traffic flow was unanimously passed during the January 5 Council meeting.

Along with City Planner Jason Paulsen, Councilman Geoff Bowie drafted a resolution that would petition the Army Corp of Engineers to study whether or not the construction of the amphitheater in Auburn would affect traffic and emergency response time in Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 3, 1988

By Joe Haberstroh and Margaret Bakken

The Enumclaw Plateau’s proposed community plan calls for slow growth, but some of the plan’s authors fear the proposed restrictions may freeze out people who had planned to build homes on small lots.

No one is sure how much land would be rezoned under the plan that Enumclaw Plateau residents in southeastern King County are receiving in the mail this week from King County. But sizable parcels once set aside for one-acre lots are proposed for a zone with lots 2 1/2 acres and larger. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 27, 1957

By Lucile McDonald

An almost forgotten structure on the White River is shown in part in the Page 1 color illustration of today’s Magazine Section. It is a drift barrier of concrete piers and cables, built some 40 years ago in an effort to prevent driftwood jams and control floods. The barrier is in the Muckleshoot Reservation, southeast of Auburn. It is reached by way of a road between Newaukum and the Academy District.

An almost forgotten structure on the White River is shown in part in the Page 1 color illustration of today’s Magazine Section. It is a drift barrier of concrete piers and cables, built some 40 years ago in an effort to prevent driftwood jams and control floods. The barrier is in the Muckleshoot Reservation, southeast of Auburn. It is reached by way of a road between Newaukum and the Academy District.

Washington has a river which nobody wanted … the White.

Today the White River’s waters pour into Puget Sound through a channel 20 miles shorter than the one it followed for untold centuries.

Until 1906 the stream flowed northward into the Green River, thence to the Duwamish and the “salt chuck.” Today it empties into the Puyallup, at Sumner, by way of the Stuck—a river which, technically speaking, has disappeared, although its name still is used by Auburn residents and appears on a state-highway bridge.

All of these rivers were once parts of the same great basin, its fingers extending into the mountain valleys. The land, built up by glacial action, eroded easily and the stream channels, made when the area was emerging from the sea, were unstable and sinuous. In flood seasons they sprawled out of banks.

The White River, with its deep mountain canyon and drift jams, was especially menacing and farmers had no love for it. (more…)

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Originally published in the The Seattle Times, November 27, 1949

(This is the second of two articles about the mass movement of inhabitants and industry from Nortonville, Calif., in the 1880s to found the King County coal town of Black Diamond.)

by Donald H. Clark

David Watkins, 84-year-old former conductor on the Pacific Coast Railroad, reminisces with his wife over an old photograph showing him in the Black Diamond band. The Watkinses were married at Black Diamond in 1886, the husband having come north from Somersville, Calif., in 1885, the year his bride-to-be also came from nearby Nortonville.

David Watkins, 84-year-old former conductor on the Pacific Coast Railroad, reminisces with his wife over an old photograph showing him in the Black Diamond band. The Watkinses were married at Black Diamond in 1886, the husband having come north from Somersville, Calif., in 1885, the year his bride-to-be also came from nearby Nortonville.

Hydroelectric developments and competition of high-class coal from Washington State threatened the life of the Black Diamond Coal Mining Company of Nortonville, Calif., in 1880. They also threatened the livelihood of Nortonville’s 900 persons, mostly Welsh and all skilled coal miners.

Prospectors sent into the Pacific Northwest by the company reported finding coal at various places, the best field being in the Green River Basin 20 miles southeast of Seattle.

Coal experts from San Francisco checked and reported favorably on the prospectors’ findings. The company’s big boss, P.B. Cornwall, bought an extensive area north of the Green River. A crew was sent from Nortonville to cut trails, clear land, and erect a few buildings. The crew also opened several coal veins and sent 500 pounds of coal to San Francisco for testing. (more…)

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