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Posts Tagged ‘Mutual Benefit Association’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 1, 1926

Black Diamond has always maintained a reputation for turning out championship teams in baseball, but in the season which just closed, the camp held the distinction of honoring two soccer football teams, both of whom made splendid records.

In the group shown above are gathered the following players: Front row, left to right, “Chick” Thompson, Chas. “Red” Towers, A. Maroni, R. Durnac, John Ogden; second row, Chas. Maroni, Jas. Strang, Vic Roberts; back row, P.J. Gallagher, J.T. Hollow, and “Boots” Pierotti. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 4, 1926

Editors and publishers of approximately 100 newspapers in the State of Washington were the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Newcastle and the Briquet Plant, last Saturday. This excursion was the closing feature of the Fourteenth Annual Newspaper Institute of the Washington Press Association.

The picture shows the group ready to board the special train after having made a trip into the Primrose Seam, a mile and a quarter into the heart of the mountain, from whence comes the famous Newcastle coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 4, 1926

Every day from 450 to 500 tons of Diamond Briquets are loaded into railroad cars for shipment to almost every point where fuel is used between Canada and Mexico on the Pacific Coast. This scene shows how the briquets are lowered from the cooling conveyor into the cars. Thousands of tons of Diamond Briquets will soon be distributed throughout the orchards of Eastern Washington, where they will be burned to protect the fruit blossoms from the ravages of frost this spring. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 14, 1926

This Link-Belt moveable crane is used at the Briquet Plant not only to load Diamond Briquets from the storage platform into the cars, but also to load coal from the storage piles into cars preparatory to sending it through the plant. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 3, 1925

I’m a coal miner for the same reason that you’re in business. To make a living.

Work in a coal mine is preferable to a job out-of-doors. Neither heat nor cold affect me, and the hazard is less than in railroading or window-washing.

I want my family to live in an American community, where American ideals prevail; where modern schools, churches, and a wholesome community spirit are present.

I want to work where there is not constant friction between employer and employee; where I can get fair play and a square deal.

In the coal mines, the state has one of its greatest natural resources. I want to help develop this industry; that commerce and manufacturing may prosper, and to keep this state free of a foreign fuel dependence.

Work in the coal mines of Washington gives me an opportunity to contribute to the upbuilding of the Pacific Northwest. I spend my money here for food, for clothes, automobiles and radios. You buy the coal which I mine and I’ll continue to add to your wealth as you promote my prosperity.

R.J. Miller
Newcastle coal miner

Washington coal mines expend more than twenty million dollars annually for payrolls and supplies! (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 19, 1925

Shortly before the tunnel work was completed in the New Black Diamond Mine last month, Manager of Mines D.C. Botting arranged for the mine superintendents and supervisors from each of the camps to inspect the property.

In addition to going over the New Black Diamond property the party also visited the Briquet Plant, where the process of manufacturing Diamond Briquets was witnessed first hand. The picture shows the group on the trestle leading from the mine entrance to the tipple and bunkers under construction. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 12, 1925

During the summer months H.H. Boyd, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s agency in Wenatchee, prepared for a big season this winter. He had the storage bins of the Wenatchee yard remodeled to permit a quicker and more economical handling of the coal. This view is from the east side, showing how the railroad cars are unloaded. Trucks can drive directly over the tracks and into the bins. Mr. Boyd is a popular citizen of Wenatchee, prominent in lodge and civic affairs. (more…)

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