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Posts Tagged ‘Navy’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 7, 2010

By Bill Kombol

The Miller boarding house was located about 500 feet east of Miller’s saloon, known as Ben’s Place.

The Miller boarding house was located about 500 feet east of Miller’s saloon, known as Ben’s Place.

This photo shows the 17-room boarding house belonging to Ben and LuLu (McCracken) Miller, which operated near a coal-mining town called Naco, the home of the Navy mine operations on the Naval coal seams.

Originally known as Sunset, the name was changed to Navy in 1908, and in 1916 the Northern Pacific railroad coined the term Naco for the railway stop. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 22, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

Prior to 1887 there was a great deal of excitement because of the alleged high grade coal beds discovered in the Raging River district, which lies southeasterly from Issaquah at distances varying from three to ten miles.

Raging River is a tributary of the Snoqualmie River and flows in a northerly direction through the center of the northeasterly portion of the King County coal fields.

The district as a whole is made up largely of steep-sided hills and rugged mountains and is a difficult and expensive field in which to prospect. The hills and mountains at the head of and on each side of Raging River contain scores of coal outcrops in many instances far up on the side of the mountains. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 25, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

Pacific Coast Coal Co. Logo 1922The articles written thus far describing the coal fields of the State of Washington have dealt with fields which, with the exception of the Bellingham coal mines in Whatcom County, do not contain coal mines of very great commercial importance.

King County, next in order of discussion, is one of the three important bituminous coal areas of the state, the other two being Pierce and Kittitas counties. King County contains coal areas of such importance that it will be advisable to divide them under subdivisions, as follows:

Newcastle–Issaquah–Grand Ridge area; Cedar River area; Raging River–Upper Cedar River area; Ravensdale–Black Diamond area; Pacosco–Hyde area; Kummer–Krain area; National–Navy area; Bayne–Pocahontas area; Durham–Kangley area.

By subdividing the field into the above groups, the geological structure of the fields and the types of coal contained in them can be handled to best advantage. (more…)

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Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Fall 2011

By Ken Jensen

You know you’ve reached Cumberland when you see this sign on the Veazie-Cumberland Road.

You know you’ve reached Cumberland when you see this sign on the Veazie-Cumberland Road.

Take a drive from Black Diamond, up Lawson Hill and past Lake 12, past Franklin and over the one-lane bridge, past the Green River Gorge Resort and up toward the foothills to the southeast….

At last you arrive at the corner of SE 352nd Street and the Veazie-Cumberland Road. An old rusted Pepsi sign marks the spot that—if it were in better condition—would sure to be coveted by those guys from American Pickers.

Welcome to Cumberland. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, August 14, 1930

Enumclaw districtAside from logging and farming, coal mining is undoubtedly one of the oldest of commercial industries in the state of Washington, millions of dollars worth of this fuel has been removed from the land in this section of the state during the past fifty years.

During the past few years the coal mining industry has been lagging, competition of other fuel from other parts of the nation has done much to bring on this condition. And lack of proper home support has been responsible in a certain degree for this depletion of mining activity.

As a result of a concerted campaign on the part of organized business of the state, the mining industry appears to be on the verge of an unusual advance. Enumclaw will benefit much because of that advance and to bring home a greater realization of what the coal industry means to us the following contributed article has been prepared through the local business men. (more…)

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Originally published in the Globe News, August 17, 1975

By Bill Smull

Large group of Cumberland area miners pose for a portrait. Knowledgeable old-timers say the picture must predate World War I, because of whale-oil miners’ lamps, forerunner of the carbide lamps. Eighth person from left in second row reportedly is Louie Cinkovich, now a resident of Enumclaw. No other information was immediately available on the picture.

Large group of Cumberland area miners pose for a portrait. Knowledgeable old-timers say the picture must predate World War I, because of whale-oil miners’ lamps, forerunner of the carbide lamps. Eighth person from left in second row reportedly is Louie Cinkovich, now a resident of Enumclaw. No other information was immediately available on the picture.

The railroad created the mines, just as surely as it created the roadbed and the shiny metal rails that carried millions of tons of coal away from the forested Cascade valleys.

The coal companies, in turn, created Cumberland, naming it after the rich Pennsylvania mining area and peopling it with thousands of immigrants who found their “promised land” in the black veins lacing those rounded, ancient hills. (more…)

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