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Posts Tagged ‘New Black Diamond’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 7, 1926

If at first you don’t succeed, there’s a reason. Find it before you try again. — The Prism (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 17, 1925

This isn’t a Santa Claus scene, though C.O. Hilen, manager of the Keithly Wood & Coal Co., the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Everett branch, will probably expect old Kris Kringle to put in an appearance at the right time.

Mr. Hilen installed the fireplace in his office several months ago and the Camp Fire Girls of Everett participated in the ceremony of starting the first fire, the fuel for which was Diamond Briquets, of course. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 10, 1925

Richard Goodhead, mine foreman at Burnett, has been a miner in this state almost as long as coal has been dug here. He has been with the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Burnett since the mine reopened several years ago, and prior to that time was at Franklin and Hyde mines.

Loyal to the company, and loyal to the men under him, he has built up the reputation of being a “Square-Shooter,” and a practical mining man. Proof of the esteem in which he is held is shown by the fact that his friends all call him “Dick.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 19, 1925

Shortly before the tunnel work was completed in the New Black Diamond Mine last month, Manager of Mines D.C. Botting arranged for the mine superintendents and supervisors from each of the camps to inspect the property.

In addition to going over the New Black Diamond property the party also visited the Briquet Plant, where the process of manufacturing Diamond Briquets was witnessed first hand. The picture shows the group on the trestle leading from the mine entrance to the tipple and bunkers under construction. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 5, 1925

Near the foot of Queen Anne Hill, corner of Taylor Avenue and Roy Street, P.J. Emt has a coal yard to which he is attracting city-wide attention. Some time ago he erected at one corner of the yard an exact replica of a fireplace, with a brick chimney, basket grate, and tile front.

Grouped before the grate are two settees upon which are often seated numbers of the neighborhood children, while before them blazes cheerily a fire of Diamond Briquets. This fire lasts all through the night, so that workmen going to their tasks before dawn, have commented upon the lasting qualities of a fuel which, hours later, still glows so brightly as they pass. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 29, 1925

Gathered at the face of the rock tunnel in the New Black Diamond Mine, the men responsible for the excellent work of engineering and drilling which recently was completed there, are shown in the accompanying flashlight picture. The scene shows the men at the conclusion of drilling 28 holes in the barrier of 9½ feet of solid sandstone, which the blast broke down and connected the tunnel with the gangway which had been driven from the opposite side.

From left to right, they are; D.C. Botting, Bert Cook, Barney Doyle, F. Van Winkle, T.L. Jones (discoverer of the mine) , E.L. Fortney, foreman, L. Hayden, Jas. E. Ash, Chas. Gallagher, Ben Allen, foreman, R.W. Smith, Chas. Ryan, C. Busti. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 22, 1925

With representatives present from Renton and Seattle, together with mining men from over the state and the official family of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, the New Black Diamond Mine was formally opened last Friday, October 16.

N.D. Moore, vice-president, pulled the switch which set off the final blast breaking down the 9-foot barrier of solid rock separating the two tunnels on which work had progressed for more than a year. (more…)

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