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Posts Tagged ‘New Year’s Eve’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 7, 1926

If at first you don’t succeed, there’s a reason. Find it before you try again. — The Prism (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 10, 1925

Richard Goodhead, mine foreman at Burnett, has been a miner in this state almost as long as coal has been dug here. He has been with the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Burnett since the mine reopened several years ago, and prior to that time was at Franklin and Hyde mines.

Loyal to the company, and loyal to the men under him, he has built up the reputation of being a “Square-Shooter,” and a practical mining man. Proof of the esteem in which he is held is shown by the fact that his friends all call him “Dick.” (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, May 2000

By Barbara Nilson

Photos by Sherrie Acker

The “action” in the 1920s to 1950s, from Seattle south, was at the lake resorts in the Valley. Memories of those glory days were shared at the March program with Dolores Gaffney and Janet Bertagni talking about Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness resort, and Gloria Foss remembering the family’s resort on Shadow Lake.

Lake Wilderness resorts

Attending the historical society program on resorts were, from left, Janet Bertagni, Dolores Gaffney Judge, and Bernadine Gaffney Gebenini.

Dolores Gaffney, daughter of Tom Gaffney, reported her father and his brother Kain purchased the property on Lake Wilderness in 1926 from Abraham and Sam Cohen. The family moved to the lake and the resort opened in the spring of 1927 as Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness.

At that time there were three small family resorts on the lake. Dieckman with his two sons, Jeff and Don, had just started one, and across the lake was McKinney’s. McKinney’s also had a dance hall that was two stories high that they eventually turned into a skating rink. In April 1939 McKinneys sold their place to Gaffneys.

One of the older buildings was used for a dance hall, said Dolores, and they used kerosene lamps. In 1936 they built a new dance hall after the old one burned down. They had a 30-foot-high diving board as well as cabins, tennis courts, picnic areas, ball fields, and playgrounds.

In 1949 Diekmans and Gaffneys were combined and the Gaffneys decided to build a lodge. The design was developed by Young, Richardson and Carlson and won the grand prize from the Washington Chapter of Architects in 1951 and the top award from the American Institute in New York in 1952. The center column totem pole was carved by the famous Doug McCarter. It is 35 feet tall and weighs ten tons. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 8, 1925

“ATTRACTIVE SIGN BOARD: Occupying a conspicuous position on North Wenatchee Avenue, directly in front of the yards of the Wenatchee branch of Pacific Coast Coal Co., is a big illuminated billboard which bears the catchy slogan, ‘A BLACK business but we treat you WHITE.’ Manager H.H. Boyd is the author of this slogan, and the volume of business handled though the Wenatchee yard testifies to the fact that Boyd lives up to his statement.” – Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 8, 1925

Occupying a conspicuous position on North Wenatchee Avenue, directly in front of the yards of the Wenatchee branch of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, is a big illuminated billboard which bears the catchy slogan, “A BLACK business but we treat you WHITE.”

Manager H.H. Boyd is the author of this slogan, and the volume of business handled through the Wenatchee yard testifies to the fact that Boyd lives up to his statement. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 1, 1925

Few towns in the country can boast as fine a general merchandise store as the new company institution in Burnett. Spacious and modern in every respect, the new store, under the direction of Manager L.W. Foreman is proving its worth to the community, and in turn the citizens of the camp are demonstrating their appreciation of the service by a constantly increasing patronage.

The Burnett store was opened in the new location early in November. Its well displayed stock, attractive windows, and showcases, must be seen to be appreciated. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 12, 1924

This trade-mark of the Pacific Coast Coal Company or some modification of it, has been proposed as the ideal design for an emblem to be worn by members and past-members of the Mine and Central councils.

Ideas on the proper type of pin to be designed may be submitted for approval at the next meeting of the Central Council, December 27. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 28, 1924

Though this is Black Diamond’s first soccer team, the boys are attracting considerable attention in the Washington State Football Association this season. Next Sunday they meet the Newcastle eleven on the latter’s field in the elimination playoff for the state cup. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 11, 1922

By Harry J. Scott

New Pacific Coast Coal Co logo - 1927The infant 1922 was given an auspicious sendoff in this man’s town. Everything necessary to an enjoyable and successful “Hi Jinks” dance was in evidence when the Clubroom was opened to the guests on Saturday evening.

Bernhard’s orchestra, the same aggregation of artists who furnished the music at our previous dance, was on hand attired in appropriate Hi Jinks costumes, and again delivered the same brand of high grade music for which they are noted. (more…)

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