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Posts Tagged ‘Newcastle’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 17, 1986

By Jim Simon

You load sixteen tons and what do you get,
Another day older and deeper in debt,
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’’t go,
I owe my soul to the company store.

“Sixteen Tons,” by Merle Travis

It has become part of our folklore: the brutal, indentured existence of miners and millworkers eking out a living in sooty company towns. We all know it was a life of oppression.

But don’t tell that to Edna Crews. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 14, 1888

No change for better or worse reported—the miners working upon brattice work

No change for better or worse was reported from the Franklin coal mine fire yesterday. Mr. Milner went out there again, going through the mine with Superintendent Watkins. He authorizes the denial of the rumor of Mr. Watkins’ resignation.

The fire is in the lower McKay tunnel, and has been located in a worked out “breast.” Mr. Milner said they were attempting to smother it out, with every prospect of success. The air is to be shut out by brattice work, which the miners began to put up Wednesday night, and which it was expected to be completed by this morning.

The effort to extinguish the fire by flooding the mine has been abandoned. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 13, 1923

Constant reference to the Newcastle “Spirit” has made that camp famous among the mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

But while other camps may lay claim to equal or superior reasons for fame, Newcastle boasts one asset which no other camp has as yet put forth.

It is the five generation family shown [to the right].

Reading from left to right, seated: Mrs. M.A. Hayes, great-great-grandmother, and next to her, Mrs. S.F. Curnutt, great-grandmother.

Standing at the left is Mrs. Ula Hyatt, grandmother, and at her side, Mrs. H.W. Rounds, mother, with her daughter, Ellen. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 6, 1923

During the month of October, when the mines broke all known records in the production of coal, the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Wenatchee depot turned in one of the best months in its history.

The view above shows the yard office at Wenatchee, with George Glann, veteran of 17 years, and the yard foreman, standing near the entrance. H.H. Boyd is the agent at Wenatchee, and his aggressiveness is resulting in the wide distribution of this company’s product throughout that district. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 29, 1923

These men are not singing the old nursery rhyme of “Rub-a-dub-dub, three men in a tub,” even though the picture does call to mind the childhood jingle. They are eight full-sized he-men with safety lamps, full lunch buckets, and skilled hands, aboard a man trip ready to start down the slope to the lower levels of Black Diamond Mine for an eight-hour shift.

Among those in the car recognized by the Bulletin photographer were: Frank Eddy, George Hoadley, Joe Marquis, Serge Head, and Robt. Ogden. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 26, 1885

The system of King County—Its cost, mileage, present and future traffic, etc.

The railroad system in King County is one of considerable magnitude now, and of rising importance. It is the largest enterprise in the county, and is doing more to increase and sustain the population than any other. Aside from the value of real estate held by the corporations, they have railroad properties in the county aggregating about $2,000,000. These properties consist of the tracks, wharves, depots, bunkers, shops, rolling stock, etc. (more…)

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