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Posts Tagged ‘Northern Pacific Railroad’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1895

Phil Early and another employee named Gibson so badly burned and injured that they died today—the cause of the explosion is not known

Tombstone of Romulous Monroe Gibson, who died in an boiler explosion at Franklin on October 3, 1895.

Tombstone of Romulous Monroe Gibson, who died in an boiler explosion at Franklin on October 3, 1895.

The Franklin mines have been the scene of another unfortunate accident by which two men lost their lives. Yesterday morning one of the boilers in a battery located at the edge of Green River, far below the mine proper, exploded, and so badly burned and injured Phil Early and a man named [Romulous Monroe] Gibson, employees, that they died today from the effects. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Northwest Post Card Club newsletter; July, August, September 2017

By Ken Jensen

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

For the miners and their families in turn-of-the-century Black Diamond—an isolated company town near the Cascade foothills of South King County, Washington—the 33-mile trip to Seattle was an all-day journey. The company’s railroad and circa 1885 depot, along with its general store, were the townspeople’s only real connection to the outside world.

In 1904 the Pacific Coast Co. owned all of Black Diamond—its mines, its land, its stores, pretty much everything—as well as neighboring Franklin and a handful of other King and Pierce county towns. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, September 9, 1900

Want ten cents per car more

Outside or common laborers asked for a raise from S2.25 to $2.50 a day—coal mine owners declare that the property will lie idle if they cannot find men willing to work for the old wages

As a result of the denial of their demand for an increase of wages 150 miners in the employ of the Seattle-San Francisco Railway & Navigation Company, at Leary, this county, went out on a strike Friday. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 7, 1896

B.F. Bush, the newly-appointed general manager of the Northern Pacific Coal Company, with headquarters at Roslyn, will leave tomorrow to look over the situation.

He will return in a few days and expects to be relieved of his present position as general superintendent of the Oregon Improvement Company about the 20th inst. Mr. Bush only returned Saturday from a business trip to British Columbia.

Mr. Bush was appointed general manager of the Northern Pacific Coal Company by its president, J.W. Kendrick who is also general manager of the Northern Pacific railroad.

The Northern Pacific Coal Company operates the coal mines at Roslyn, at Kangley, and those at Bozeman, Mont. The company owns other coal properties which will be opened up and worked under the direction of the new general manager.

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 27, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

“We’ve lived in coal revivals since 1915. We have spurts and then, they fall off,” observed John Markus, Sr., proprietor of Ravensdale’s principal place of business, a grocery on the Kent-Kangley Road.

The little community with the euphonious name in South King County’s coal belt is about to have another “spurt,” however. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 26, 1910

Period of greatest danger passed, through spectacular and successful work of fighting forces

Departments conflict on firing great guns

William Entwistle’s force risks death in mad race to Maple Valley with auto load of dynamite

The forest fire story in brief

Two bad fires break out near standing timber reserves, King County. Forest supervisors take 200 men into woods but fail to control conflagrations.

Blaze in young timber near Scenic Hot Springs breaks all bounds and is beyond control. Forest supervisor in charge.

Town of Walsh, on Columbia & Puget Sound, badly scorched, loss including one saloon, two-story dwelling house, barn, and buildings of England’s logging camp.

Dynamite to the amount of 500 pounds taken into Maple Valley district by fire fighters, who prepare to dynamite tops of trees in old timber to stop destructive fires.

Cooler weather makes work of forest fire workers easier, but danger will continue until rains fall.

The town of Bothell, at the head of Lake Washington, which was in danger of destruction yesterday, is reported safe. No buildings were destroyed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 22, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

The rebuilt Selleck School, completed in 1930, now serves as the Pacific States Condominiums. This April 10, 1940, photo is courtesy King County Assessor Property Card collection, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Branch.

The rebuilt Selleck School, completed in 1930. This April 10, 1940, photo is courtesy King County Assessor Property Card collection, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Branch.

At the end the Kent-Kangley Road east of Maple Valley is the mill town of Selleck, which still exists today; next door was the town of Lavender, or “Jap Town.” The mill is gone, but the school is still there and about 16 of the original houses. (more…)

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