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Posts Tagged ‘Northwest Improvement Company’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 14, 1924

State Mine Inspector W.R. Reese, a veteran in the coal industry of the State of Washington and recognized as one of the leading authorities on coal mining, has been made an honorary member of the Joseph A. Holmes Safety Associations at the various camps of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Mr. Reese takes a keen interest in safety work and is constantly striving to see that the hazards of mining are reduced to the minimum.

Many years ago he was a superintendent in the Pacific Coast Coal Company, and prior to becoming state mine inspector was connected with the Northwestern Improvement Company for many years. Few know the mines of this state better than W.R. Reese. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, January 18, 1907

Trainmen call on authorities for help but sheriff and police are conveniently absent

Railroad had been warned of the contemplated action

North Yakima, Jan. 9 — More than 200 desperate citizens of this city and farmers of the surrounding country held up a coal train at the station here at 3:30 yesterday afternoon and carried off all the fuel they needed to tide them over the cold snap. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 13, 1910

Explosion of fire damp results when fire eats through from old workings in N.W. Imp. Co.’s property

Five men injured and two entombed

An explosion in the Northwestern Improvement Company’s mine at Ravensdale at 11 o’clock this morning fatally injured three miners, seriously injured two others, and imprisoned two more.

A 2 o’clock this afternoon the mine was on fire and the fate of the two imprisoned men is in doubt. Rescuers are at work, but unless the prisoners are liberated within the next two hours they will be consumed by the flames. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 14, 1923

Chemical discovered during war oxidizes carbon monoxide, making it harmless

For more than two hours yesterday prominent coal miners, superintendents, engineers, foremen, representatives of the State Mine Department, and of the Seattle Fire and Police Departments gathered at the federal mine rescue station at the University of Washington and took part in a demonstration of a new “self rescuer,” or small gas mask which will permit a man to live in air heavily impregnated with deadly monoxide gas from forty minutes to more than an hour.

The demonstration was made in a small room, into which the exhaust of the White mine rescue truck of the government was piped. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 27, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

“We’ve lived in coal revivals since 1915. We have spurts and then, they fall off,” observed John Markus, Sr., proprietor of Ravensdale’s principal place of business, a grocery on the Kent-Kangley Road.

The little community with the euphonious name in South King County’s coal belt is about to have another “spurt,” however. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 27, 1915

A first aid and mine rescue contest, in which teams will be entered representing at least three of the large coal mining companies of Western Washington, is to be a feature of the Labor Day celebration at Black Diamond, next month.

Employees of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, the Northwestern Improvement Company, and the Carbon Hill Coal Company make up the three teams entered, and Black Diamond, Newcastle, and Carbonado will be the towns represented. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 11, 1913

Men employed in collieries of Pacific Coast Company quit in sympathy with discharged committeeman

Organization growing about Black Diamond

Seven hundred miners employed in the three collieries of the Pacific Coast Company at Black Diamond walked out this morning because the company had refused to reinstate George Ayers, a member of the “pit committee,” reputed to be an I.W.W. organizer in the Black Diamond district.

Ayers was discharged following a quarrel with a subforman named Mitchell, with whom he had taken up a grievance of a miner who had not been supplied with a “bucker.” Ayers is said to have become abusive when Mitchell told him that he had no authority to regulate employment. (more…)

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