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Posts Tagged ‘Northwest Improvement Company’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 11, 1913

Men employed in collieries of Pacific Coast Company quit in sympathy with discharged committeeman

Organization growing about Black Diamond

Seven hundred miners employed in the three collieries of the Pacific Coast Company at Black Diamond walked out this morning because the company had refused to reinstate George Ayers, a member of the “pit committee,” reputed to be an I.W.W. organizer in the Black Diamond district.

Ayers was discharged following a quarrel with a subforman named Mitchell, with whom he had taken up a grievance of a miner who had not been supplied with a “bucker.” Ayers is said to have become abusive when Mitchell told him that he had no authority to regulate employment. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 6, 1922

Beautiful silver cup which is held by Burnett Mine is object of competition

L.S. Campbell, captain of the Carbonado team, holding the Mine Rescue Cup won by his team in 1922.

L.S. Campbell, captain of the Carbonado team, holding the Mine Rescue Cup won by his team in 1922.

Acting in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Mines and the State Mining Department, coal operators in Western Washington have arranged for a mine rescue and first-aid meet to be held at Burnett on Labor Day, September 4.

State Mine Inspector Abe Morris is chairman of the arrangements committee. John G. Schoning, representative of the Federal Bureau of Mines, is in charge of the program.

The meet, which is perhaps the most important held in years, is intended to include all the important coal operators in Western Washington, and invitations to participate have been sent to the following: Carbon Hill Coal Company, Carbonado; Carbon Coal & Clay Company, Bayne; Wilkeson Coal & Coke Company, Wilkeson; Fairfax Coal Company. Fairfax; Durham Coal Company, Durham; Ozark Coal Company, Cumberland; Bellingham Coal Company, Bellingham; Victory Coal Company, Centralia; Olympic Coal Company, Centralia; Ford Prairie Coal Company, Centralia; Pacific Coast Coal Company, which has mines now operating at Black Diamond, Newcastle, Issaquah, and Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 27, 1919

The fourth annual statewide mine rescue and first aid meet, to be held under the joint auspices of the United States Bureau of Mines, the state mine inspection department, the Washington Coal Operators’ Association, and District No. 10 of the United Mine Workers of America, will be staged at Black Diamond on Saturday, August 9, according to an announcement made by the executive committee in charge of arrangements. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 7, 1914

More than 15 trained corps of emergency mines men to take part in big field meet on varsity campus

Contest approved by Bureau of Mines: Director J.J. Corey, head of University Station, makes plans for first competition of kind in Washington

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, 1917

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, 1917

More than fifteen drilled first aid and mines rescue teams, representing nearly every coal mining company in the state, and including a team from the Northern Pacific Railroad at Cle Elum, will participate in the first contest of its kind ever held in Washington, July 22 and 23, on the cadet drill grounds on the University of Washington campus. Preparations have been going on for several weeks and final arrangements for the meet are nearly completed.

Approved by the United States Bureau of Mines and under the personal supervision of J.J. Corey, director of the Mine Rescue Station on the university campus, the meet as planned will become an annual affair. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 2, 1972

By Don Duncan

Matthew McTurk (left) and Richard H. Parry

Matthew McTurk (left) and Richard H. Parry

Richard H. Parry, stocky Welshman, turned 90 the other day. Parry and Matthew McTurk, 85, a wiry Scot, recalled the days when they almost really owed their souls to the company store.

Not in Appalachia, mind you. But right here in Washington State, where human moles burrowed into the ground at Roslyn, Black Diamond, Ravensdale, Wilkeson and Carbonado and the basement coal bin was as much a part the home as the kitchen icebox.

At times Parry and McTurk disagreed loudly on historical points—“Now you shut up and let me tell it”—but it was all noise and no heat; the disagreement of old, old friends. Afterward they embraced warmly. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 28, 1921

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

The purpose of this preliminary sketch is to give the readers of the Bulletin a general view of the coal fields of the state, this to be followed by more detailed articles covering each of the counties in which coal occurs in commercial quantities.

Near the northern boundary line of the state, on the northwest slope of Mt. Baker, there is a small area containing anthracite and anthracitic coal. So far no commercial mines have been developed within this field.

Westward and near the shore of Bellingham Bay, is an area containing a coal bed that is being developed by the Bellingham Mines Company. It is not known at present what the full extent of this area is, but it is probable that additional discoveries will be made in Whatcom County. (more…)

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Doubtless you have wondered what Geo. Watkin Evans, author of the interesting series of articles on the coal fields of the State of Washington appearing in the Bulletin, looks like. Here he is in his fishing togs. He is the figure on the left, and the pleased expression on his face comes from the fact—solemnly sworn to by Mr. Evans—that the ten fish on the string he is holding were all caught by him on one hook in ten minutes while in Alaska some years ago.

Doubtless you have wondered what Geo. Watkin Evans, author of the interesting series of articles on the coal fields of the State of Washington appearing in the Bulletin, looks like. Here he is in his fishing togs. He is the figure on the left, and the pleased expression on his face comes from the fact—solemnly sworn to by Mr. Evans—that the ten fish on the string he is holding were all caught by him on one hook in ten minutes while in Alaska some years ago.

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 22, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

The famous McKay coal seam, originally opened at Black Diamond, has either been mined, or traced continuously into the Ravensdale district, at which point it was originally mined some years ago.

The Ravensdale mine, originally called the Leary mine, was opened in 1899 by the Seattle and San Francisco Railway & Navigation Company. At a later date the property was purchased by the Northwestern Improvement Company, which is the coal division of the Northern Pacific Railroad. (more…)

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