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Posts Tagged ‘Nortonville’

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, October 20, 1989

By Peggy Ziebarth
Valley Living Editor

Diane and Corey Olson, who edited the history, are shown near the Black Diamond Museum. (Staff photo by Duane Hamamura.)

Diane and Corey Olson, who edited the history, are shown near the Black Diamond Museum. (Staff photo by Duane Hamamura.)

Voices out of Black Diamond’s past tell the story of mine disasters, whispered scandals, sports shenanigans and colorful characters in Black Diamond: Mining the Memories.

Tales spun by the Welsh, Italian, Slavic and other settlers of the town—dependent on the mines for its lifeblood—weave a lively pattern of poignant portraits of hard life and high times in Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 29, 2006

By Kathleen Kear

“Celebrate Black Diamond History” program

“Celebrate Black Diamond History” program

Rich in history, which dates back to 1884 when the California town of Nortonville moved to the Black Diamond area to mine the highest quality coal found on the West Coast, Black Diamond is celebrating that history during its annual Labor Days festivities this coming weekend Saturday, Sept. 2nd through Monday, Sept. 4th.

New to the list of Labor Day events that begin on Saturday, Sept. 2nd is the Puget Sound Blood Drive that will be held in conjunction with the annual Softball Game this year between the Black Diamond Fire Department and the community, which begins at 10 a.m. Rumor has it that the kids have been practicing quite a bit lately and are looking forward to putting the department’s “fire out!” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 10, 1922

Dave Botting was named manager of mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company in 1922.

Dave Botting

D.C. Botting, for many years connected with the coal mining industry in this state, returns on September 1 to become Manager of Mines of this company. He has for three years past been General Manager of the Vandalia Coal Company and its associated mining interests, one of the large coal operations of the country, having some eighteen mines in Indiana and two in West Virginia.

Mr. Botting, known, by the way, to everyone as “Dave,” was born in the coal fields of California fifty-one years ago, and when a boy worked in the mines at Nortonville in that state.

The owners of that property also operated the present Black Diamond mines here, and when about nineteen years of age Mr. Botting came to this state. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, February 8, 1993

Photo courtesy of Black Diamond Museum

Photo courtesy of Black Diamond Museum

Black Diamond got its name from the Black Diamond Mining Company of Nortonville, Calif., which in 1880 was looking for high-quality coal for its customers.

The company found Valley-area coal to be soft and low in sulphur, so tent towns were pitched and Black Diamond became king of the coal industry. (more…)

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Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Fall 2013

By JoAnne Matsumura

clarissa davisLike many of those first arrivals in Black Diamond, Clarissa Stevens Davis came from Nortonville, California. She came “first to Renton, and then by horse and buggy for a ways, and then they had to walk to Black Diamond.

“She was the first woman brought into camp. It was all tents—except [for] two men [who] had a cabin down here on this creek. They made them move out and gave her the cabin,” stated her granddaughter, Verna Thompson. (more…)

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From left, Ted Barner, Bob Eaton and Frank Guidetti, members of the Black Diamond Historical Society, stand In front of the old railroad depot they and other members of the society have been refurbishing to serve as a museum of Black Diamond’s early days.

From left, Ted Barner, Bob Eaton and Frank Guidetti, members of the Black Diamond Historical Society, stand in front of the old railroad depot they and other members of the society have been refurbishing to serve as a museum of Black Diamond’s early days.

Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 3, 1980

By Herb Belanger

BLACK DIAMOND — Hang in there, King County. Black Diamond might be able to give you a hand with your overcrowded-jail problems.

Members of the Black Diamond Historical Society just might be persuaded to let the county use the long-empty city jail they’ve been rehabilitating along with the city’s long-unused railroad depot. (more…)

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Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Summer 2013

By Bill Kombol

The Coal Miners’ Honor Garden was dedicated during Black Diamond Miners’ Day, July 6. (Photo: Bob Dobson.)

The Coal Miners’ Honor Garden was dedicated during Black Diamond Miners’ Day, July 6. (Photo: Bob Dobson.)

My father was a coal miner. So were both grandfathers and three of my four great-grandfathers. As were a host of uncles, great uncles, and cousins. I was privileged to work at a coal mine, Rogers No. 3 in Ravensdale—the last underground coal mine in the state of Washington. One of the first books I can remember having read to me was Two Little Miners.

You might say I grew up in a coal mining culture.

My name is Bill Kombol and today I manage a company, Palmer Coking Coal Co., whose name stretches back 80 years to an era when coal was king.

It’s a phrase I adapted for a weekly column I write for the Voice of the Valley, a local newspaper.

When the historical society approached me to write about what the miners’ statue means to me, I was humbled. (more…)

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