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Posts Tagged ‘Oregon Improvement Co.’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 11, 1913

Men employed in collieries of Pacific Coast Company quit in sympathy with discharged committeeman

Organization growing about Black Diamond

Seven hundred miners employed in the three collieries of the Pacific Coast Company at Black Diamond walked out this morning because the company had refused to reinstate George Ayers, a member of the “pit committee,” reputed to be an I.W.W. organizer in the Black Diamond district.

Ayers was discharged following a quarrel with a subforman named Mitchell, with whom he had taken up a grievance of a miner who had not been supplied with a “bucker.” Ayers is said to have become abusive when Mitchell told him that he had no authority to regulate employment. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, June 9, 1897

Receiver C.J. Smith of the Oregon Improvement Company, has already started work on the task of broadening the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, for which he recently obtained authority from the Federal court.

Monday he let a contract for the materials to be used in the construction of the eighty coal and flat cars which will be built here. A force of men has already been set at work preparing the roadbed for the forthcoming change.

Three truss bridges will be practically rebuilt. That at Renton, another at Maple Valley, and a third east of Renton and known as No. 12 will be treated in this manner.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 30, 1896

Broad-gauge road to mines

Extensive improvements in view in Seattle on the company’s dockage—Ballast Island will have a fireproof brick warehouse

With the reorganization of the Oregon Improvement Company, whose principal holdings are at Seattle and in King County, are to come important and far-reaching improvements. The plan of reorganization has already been announced in New York as perfected by the committee of reorganization.

The old company is to be closed out and the new company with the old security-holders will buy it in, the old holders of security taking new stock in the proportion agreed upon. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 10, 1884

P.B. Cornwall

P.B. Cornwall

P.B. Cornwall, principal owner of the Black Diamond coal mines in this county, arrived from San Francisco on the Queen last evening, accompanied by his wife and son. In a brief interview with a Post Intelligencer reported last night, Mr. Cornwall said:

“We have expended a large sum of money in developing our Black Diamond mine in this county—considerably over sixty-thousand dollars—and cannot do much more until the railroad is completed to our mine. We have a contract with the Oregon Improvement Company for the transportation of our coal to Seattle, and are very much disappointed that the Cedar River extension is not being pushed ahead.

“We have made arrangements for the shipment of our coal from this city to the markets of the world, and all that is keeping us back is the failure of the Oregon Improvement Company to complete the road. We are willing to advance them sufficient money with what they have, to complete the road to our mines, and we are waiting to hear from New York now.

“I shall be on the Sound several weeks, during which time I shall visit Whatcom, to look after extensive interests at that point.”

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 29, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

Pacosco, as it is now called, was formerly Franklin. This district was first opened on the banks of Green River on the McKay Coal Seam about 1885. The railroad was extended from Black Diamond in order to develop this coal area.

Originally, Franklin Mine was opened by a drift driven on the McKay Coal at bunker level above the old railroad grade. Later a water level gangway was driven from the edge of Green River and the coal hoisted up an incline on the surface and dumped over the same tipple as that from the upper level. Later a slope was sunk on another bed which underlies the McKay and all of the coal below the original bunker level was hauled through this opening.

Numerous slopes were sunk at Franklin and also one shaft was developed. Most of the coal was mined from the McKay Bed but some was also mined from two underlying beds, the Number Twelve and the Number Ten. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 26, 1893

The Hanson-Turnbull wedding: A “hard times” entertainment

The likely location of the ball was the Masonic Lodge (left of center, ca. 1915). The photographer was looking up Baker St. toward Third Ave. (The Congregational Church is to the right; St. Barbara’s in the background.) Today’s Masonic Hall resides in the same location.

The Masonic Hall, left of center, ca. 1915. The photographer was looking up Baker St. toward Third Ave. (The Congregational Church is to the right; St. Barbara’s in the background.) Today’s Masonic Hall resides in the same location.

Mr. Alexander G. Hanson and Miss Jeanie J. Turnbull were married in the Masonic hall at Black Diamond on Tuesday evening by Rev. H.T. Shepard. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 12, 1888

A community where constables and officers of the law are not needed—Remarkable progress and substantial prosperity

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Probably the majority of the readers of the Post-Intelligencer have never inspected a coal mine or visited a town where coal mining was the exclusive industry. They have, therefore, necessarily but an imperfect knowledge of a large and very excellent class of the working population of this territory, and especially of King County.

A representative of this paper visited Franklin, in this county, a day or two ago and made some observations which may be of general interest. (more…)

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