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Posts Tagged ‘Orillia’

Originally published in Valley Living, October 9, 1987

By Peggy Ziebarth
Valley Living Editor

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

“Every time an old house goes, a part of me goes with it,” says Dan Palmer, shuffling through a stack of photographs of historic landmarks scattered over the Valley.

“I can take it when nature takes them, but when it’s the bulldozers…,” Palmer’s voice softens in regret.

Palmer, a folk musician and craftsman by trade, really started getting serious about Valley history when he moved to Black Diamond. And as his interest grew, he started accumulating articles and books on the area’s roots and mounting his own collection of photographs of buildings still standing and the overgrown remnants of a boisterous coal mining past. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 16, 1920

The Maple Valley grade school was built in 1920.

The Maple Valley grade school was built in 1920.

We have 19,196 census children in the count outside Seattle, an increase of 1,755 over last year; our enrollment will be about 16,000. To keep up with this rapid growth on limited school finances has given our boards of directors a great deal of work in providing sufficient facilities, arranging for transportation, and the selection of additional teaching force.

New buildings have been built during the summer or are under way at Auburn, Maple Valley, Bellevue, Black Diamond, Orillia, Kent, Edgewood, Star Lake, North Bend, Veazie, Honey Creek, and Duvall.

At other places buildings have been enlarged or portables erected to take care of the increase in school population, so we can say the year opens with a qualified teacher in every school room, adequate housing facilities for every child, and with every community anxious and willing to give the fullest support to public education. We are at the threshold of a successful school year.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 18, 1924

July Fourth was a big day for Black Diamond coal and Diamond Briquets at Sedro-Woolley. On that occasion W.E. Ropes of Ropes Transfer carried off first prize in the patriotic parade with the float shown in the above engraving. Mr. Ropes has been operating in Sedro-Woolley for 14 years and he handles Pacific Coast Coal Company coals exclusively.

Some fine specimens of Black Diamond lump coal were arranged along the top of the float just under the slogan, “Heat That’s Cheap,” while along the sides appeared the word “Briquets,” spelled out with genuine Diamond Briquets themselves.

On the same day in Everett the Pacific Coast Coal Company agency there also won first prize with a beautifully decorated float, a reproduction of which appears elsewhere in this issue of the Bulletin. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 18, 1906

Survey runs from Tacoma east of Orillia and stops at junction of the NP and Columbia & Puget Sound

James F. McElroy, Charley Farrell, and A.T. Van de Vanter buy large tract of land in path of right-of-way

“The Milwaukee road will complete a trackage arrangement with the Columbia & Puget Sound and enter Seattle over their rails.”

That was the statement made to a reporter for The Times last night by a man who stands closer to those behind the local Milwaukee guns than any other. He has been closely connected with Northwestern railroad affairs for years and may be relied upon thoroughly. Continuing, he said:

“You may say safely that the Milwaukee will cross the mountains through Snoqualmie Pass. The road will then run down through Rattlesnake Prairie and strike the Cedar River at Maple Valley. It will run toward the Sound as far as the junction of the Northern Pacific and Columbia & Puget Sound and will then enter Seattle over the C&PS tracks. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 27, 1906

Grading expected to be far enough advanced by that time to permit contractors to construct new tracks

Right-of-way through Cedar River Valley will be improved as soon as the franchise ordinance permits

Line reaching for Tacoma beyond Black River Junction will parallel the Puget Sound Electric Company

Actual track laying will commence on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul’s line in this state by fall. Grading on the extension up Cedar River Valley from the point near Maple Valley where the St. Paul leaves the tracks of the Columbia & Puget Sound, will begin as soon as the company is notified of the approval of its franchise ordinance.

The camps will be established within a few days. The mills of the state are so busy with orders for rail and cargo shipment that they will be unable to handle the big contract the St. Paul will have to let. As a result a number of portable mills will be sent into the woods along the right of way of the St. Paul and ties will be gotten out at convenient points. (more…)

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Entire valley under water and the junction shut off from outside communication

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 5, 1903

The Denny-Renton Clay Co.’s first factory was located at Van Asselt, located near today’s Boeing Field. It was named for Henry Van Asselt (pictured), one of the county’s first pioneers. To learn more about Henry Van Asselt, read this article from the <a href="http://sococulture.org/duwamish-pioneer-served-civil-war-militia/" target="_blank">South King County Cultural Coalition</a>.

The Denny-Renton Clay Co.’s first factory was located at Van Asselt, located near today’s Boeing Field. It was named for Henry Van Asselt, one of the county’s first pioneers. To learn more about Henry Van Asselt, read this article from the South King County Cultural Coalition.

BLACK RIVER, Monday, Jan. 5—The entire valley is practically under water. The river is higher than ever known before. Late last evening water raised until the Columbia & Puget Sound track was flooded and washed out for a quarter of a mile. Great damage was done the Northern Pacific double track between here and Argo. Two bridges and many culverts are gone and railway traffic is entirely suspended. There is a great loss of livestock reported. No human lives have been lost.

The river reached its height about midnight and is now falling. The highway between here and Orillia is impassible except by boat. The interurban railway is practically all gone between Kent and Van Asselt. (more…)

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