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Posts Tagged ‘Orting’

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, February 22, 1994

Program helps families build and buy homes

By Chris Swanson
Valley Daily News

Erin Stout and Jerry Benien work on bending rebar for the footings of Jerry’s house. (Valley Daily News photo by Marcus R. Donner.)

BLACK DIAMOND — The construction crew at The Ridge at Black Diamond is literally building for a better future—their own.

It’s called “sweat equity,” and it’s not for the faint of heart.

Nineteen family households broken into two groups are now working on 19 homes at this subdivision. Another group will begin construction on the final eight homes in June.

They will be spending 30 hours a week here for the next nine to 12 months—until their new homes and the homes of their neighbors are done and they all can move in.

“They have to want this very badly,” said Judy Kelly of Northwest Housing Development, based in Sumner. “It’s quite a commitment.”

For these families, it may or may not be a labor of love. But it is definitely a labor of necessity. Most have incomes below 80 percent of the median level in King County ($38,400 for a family of four). (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 24, 1925

Though these men are not on jury duty no court could find a more impartial nor fair-minded group than the Black Diamond supervisors shown in the accompanying halftone. For confirmation of this statement just ask any miner or workman employed at the mine. The group, from left to right, includes, Jack Emmanuel, Richard Parry, Tom Edwards, E.D. Rockey, and Robt. Cruickshank. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 12, 1925

Feb. 12, 1809—Apr. 15, 1865

Feb. 12, 1809—Apr. 15, 1865

One hundred sixteen years ago the Great Emancipator was born amid humbler surroundings than is the birthright of most Americans today. Yet his memory is hallowed year by year by millions, and the example of his noble ideals is set before every schoolchild; an inspiration to the attainment of the loftiest pinnacle of success, no matter how lowly the start. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 2, 1925

William Rose is fatally wounded during battle between citizens and desperadoes in Pierce County

They stopped bank bandits. These are photographs of the posse that shot to death two bandits who held up the State Bank of Buckley yesterday afternoon and a section of the main-street in the town where the pistol battle was staged. 1—The building with white pillars on the left is the bank. The pair of bandits were slain a half-block away at a point in the center of the photograph. 2—View of the entrance to the bank, through which one of the bandits and the town marshal exchanged a volley of shots. 3—Marshal Ed. Nelson, left, and Aaron Haydon, former marshal, who fired the shots which mortally wounded the desperadoes when the revolver fight was at its height. 4—The bank officials who narrowly. escaped death at the hands of the excited robbers. Left to right they are: C.A. Stewart, assistant cashier; A.E. Hovey, cashier; C.A. Steberg, president. 5—Marshal Nelson, who headed a speedily organized posse of merchants.

They stopped bank bandits. These are photographs of the posse that shot to death two bandits who held up the State Bank of Buckley yesterday afternoon and a section of the main-street in the town where the pistol battle was staged. 1—The building with white pillars on the left is the bank. The pair of bandits were slain a half-block away at a point in the center of the photograph. 2—View of the entrance to the bank, through which one of the bandits and the town marshal exchanged a volley of shots. 3—Marshal Ed. Nelson, left, and Aaron Haydon, former marshal, who fired the shots which mortally wounded the desperadoes when the revolver fight was at its height. 4—The bank officials who narrowly. escaped death at the hands of the excited robbers. Left to right they are: C.A. Stewart, assistant cashier; A.E. Hovey, cashier; C.A. Steberg, president. 5—Marshal Nelson, who headed a speedily organized posse of merchants.

In a revolver duel which followed the first bank robbery in the history of the town of Buckley, forty miles southeast of Seattle, in Pierce County, yesterday afternoon, two unmasked, unidentified desperadoes died “with their boots on,” and William Rose, 54 years old, business man of Buckley, was fatally wounded. Rose died in the Taylor-Lacey Hospital in Auburn at 8:15 o’clock this morning.

One of the bandits was shot from the running board of an automobile speeding away with the loot. The other was killed when he drove back for the body of his dead companion. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 28, 1989

Fourteen sites in Pierce County and two sites in King County have been selected as locations for Washington centennial historical markers.

Puget Sound Power and Light will donate the markers to be placed in about 85 communities throughout its nine-county service area.

The 10-inch-square markers will replicate the official centennial dome shape and will be cast in solid brass by Anacortes Brass Works. They will be presented during ceremonies to be held during the summer months. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 20, 1902

He may be in the woods near Sawyer Lake or he may be miles away—No one knows

Harry Tracy mugshot

Harry Tracy mugshot

Tracy has apparently dropped as completely out of sight as though the earth had opened and swallowed him. Since his disappearance from the cabin on the shores of Lake Sawyer last Wednesday afternoon, or night, no trace of him has been had.

His long silence and failure to appear at some house for food and clothing lends weight to the opinion of Sheriff Cudihee that Tracy is still in hiding in the vicinity of the lake. (more…)

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