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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Car and Foundry’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 16, 1997

By Paul Gottlieb
The Courier-Herald

Howard Botts

After 14 years as mayor of Black Diamond, Howard Botts wants four more.

Botts announced his intention to run for a fourth term at the Black Diamond City Council meeting April 10, two days before his 66th birthday.

“We’ll see whether it’s a present or not,” he quipped Friday.

Botts, a lifelong Black Diamond resident, was appointed mayor in 1982 after Vivian Bainton resigned. He has never faced opposition for the $400-a-month position, which comes up for election Nov. 4. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2005

By Barbara Nilson

Francis Niemela displays a sketch of the cabin his father Charles built of railroad ties on Lake Francis in 1915.

Francis Niemela displays a sketch of the cabin his father Charles built of railroad ties on Lake Francis in 1915.

Eighty-four years of memories will be on tap, Sunday, Feb. 12, [2006,] at the Grange Hall, when Francis Niemela recalls life with the Finnish community on Lake Francis. His parents, Charles and Katri Niemela, came to Maple Valley and purchased 20 acres at the lake in 1915.

During that time there was a railroad that came around the lake and his Dad picked up railroad ties and built his first house out of them. Later that building was converted to a sauna and also used for smoking salmon and bacon when they constructed a large loghouse in 1918. That home was later purchased by the Dufenhorst family.

The Finns at Lake Francis had little stump ranches and their saunas in place of indoor plumbing. Niemela said the greatest sauna was the Lahtinen’s. It was open house every Saturday night and Mrs. Lahtinen would serve coffee and goodies. “Some of the offspring of those Finns like Walt Sipila and Walt Miller are still here,” he said. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, November 9, 1988

By McKay Jenkins

Remove the chain from the yellow caboose sitting in front of the Black Diamond Historical Society and you’ll open a door to the city’s history.

Inside, beneath the rotting ceilings and creaking floorboards, is a dilapidated testament to the men who once hauled their livelihoods from the bowels of the earth.

The museum that once housed the town’s train depot now has a train pulled up in front of the station. All that remains is a lot of restoration work for volunteers, said Bob Eaton, the museum’s president.

The caboose was built by Pacific Car and Foundry in Renton in 1921 for the Northern Pacific Railway. Weyerhaeuser then bought it to transport wood, and eventually gave it to the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 14, 1978

By George and Dianne Wilson

Darrel and Jewell McCloud are here seen at their Black Diamond home among their gorgeous flowers which include 350 rosebushes “and much, much morel”

Darrel and Jewell McCloud are here seen at their Black Diamond home among their gorgeous flowers which include 350 rosebushes “and much, much more!”

Over 350 roses, more than 150 tuberous begonias, plus much, much more can be seen in one gorgeous spot in Black Diamond! No, it’s not a park or a nursery; it’s the home of Darrel and Jewell McCloud on 1st Street, across from the elementary school.

When the McClouds moved here 34 years ago from Ellensburg, they brought with them six or eight roses. Over the years, their collection has “grown like Topsy,” often through the Valentine’s Day gifts of rose bushes for Jewell from their son Michael. They now have 56 new roses imported from Canada. (more…)

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Originally published in the Tacoma News Tribune, November 15, 1964

By Rod Cardwell

Down the Road a PieceIt was called “Lavender Town,” a Japanese settlement near the great lumber mill that flourished in Selleck … east out of Kent in the King County uplands that swing gradually into the Cascade Range.

And the women would appear outside among the flowers in their colorful kimonos, many in shades of purple … and the children came home from the English-speaking school to receive instruction in Japanese.

Today, Lavender Town, where the men went forth to labor for the Pacific States Lumber Co., is only a memory. … The mill, after fires and labor strife, ceased to operate just before World War II. … And with Pearl Harbor came the removal of the Japanese to camps far inland. Later, although peace prevailed and a mood of hate and suspicion had vanished, most of them never returned. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, January 1959

Black Diamond, Enumclaw’s next-door neighbor to the north, voted to incorporate as a fourth class town on January 20. At the same election, the voters named seven officials to conduct the town’s business. From left to right are councilwoman Mrs. Gertrude Botts, councilmen Ernest Richardson and Stan W. Hubber, Mayor Lloyd W. Hagen, councilman Gomer Evans Jr., treas. Frank Costi and councilman Louis J. Zumek. The picture was taken at an informal meeting held at the home of Mayor and Mrs. Hagen on Wednesday evening, January 21. —C-H Staff Photo

Black Diamond, Enumclaw’s next-door neighbor to the north, voted to incorporate as a fourth class town on January 20. At the same election, the voters named seven officials to conduct the town’s business. From left to right are councilwoman Mrs. Gertrude Botts, councilmen Ernest Richardson and Stan W. Hubber, Mayor Lloyd W. Hagen, councilman Gomer Evans Jr., treas. Frank Costi and councilman Louis J. Zumek. The picture was taken at an informal meeting held at the home of Mayor and Mrs. Hagen on Wednesday evening, January 21. —C-H Staff Photo

Seven miles northeast of Enumclaw, not far from the north bank of the tortuous Green River, a ghost has yawned and is giving every indication that before long it will throw off its spooky habiliments and take on real flesh and blood.

As the result of a special election on Tuesday, January 20, the Black Diamond settlement, after approximately 75 years’ of existence, became a fourth class incorporated town. At the same election, the voters named a mayor, treasurer, four councilmen and one councilwoman. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 24, 1959

Cracker-barrel confab: Three town officials elected when Black Diamond incorporated as a fourth-class city last Tuesday, held a post-election conference in the town grocery store. From left, Mrs. Gertrude Botts, council member; Frank Costi, city treasurer and ex-officio city clerk, and Gomers Evans, Jr., councilman. Two of Mrs. Botts’ six children, David, 3, and Connie, 5, were in the foreground. The incorporation was a major step in efforts to rejuvenate the town, once a coal-mining center. —Times staff photo by John T. Closs.

Cracker-barrel confab: Three town officials elected when Black Diamond incorporated as a fourth-class city last Tuesday, held a post-election conference in the town grocery store. From left, Mrs. Gertrude Botts, council member; Frank Costi, city treasurer and ex-officio city clerk, and Gomers Evans, Jr., councilman. Two of Mrs. Botts’ six children, David, 3, and Connie, 5, were in the foreground. The incorporation was a major step in efforts to rejuvenate the town, once a coal-mining center.
—Times staff photo by John T. Closs.

By John J. Reddin, Times Staff Reporter

BLACK DIAMOND, Jan. 24 — This once booming coal-mining town, now “just another wide spot in the road,” is being given a taste of “Operation Bootstrap” by a group of spirited residents and merchants.

And, like a sick patient responding to a shot of adrenalin, the sleepy town is feeling the effects of its unexpected awakening.

Black Diamond virtually has stood still since the mid-1920s, when a strike closed several of the larger coal mines. A decrease in the demand for coal also has contributed to the “economic bust.” (more…)

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