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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Bulletin’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 15, 1925

One of the first structures in Carbonado to catch the eye of the visitor is that of the company store. Of brick construction, it houses the general merchandise store and meat market, while in the rear is situated the mine office. Manager C.T. Paulson and his staff are always ready to see that the wants of every customer are promptly satisfied. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 8, 1925

“ATTRACTIVE SIGN BOARD: Occupying a conspicuous position on North Wenatchee Avenue, directly in front of the yards of the Wenatchee branch of Pacific Coast Coal Co., is a big illuminated billboard which bears the catchy slogan, ‘A BLACK business but we treat you WHITE.’ Manager H.H. Boyd is the author of this slogan, and the volume of business handled though the Wenatchee yard testifies to the fact that Boyd lives up to his statement.” – Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 8, 1925

Occupying a conspicuous position on North Wenatchee Avenue, directly in front of the yards of the Wenatchee branch of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, is a big illuminated billboard which bears the catchy slogan, “A BLACK business but we treat you WHITE.”

Manager H.H. Boyd is the author of this slogan, and the volume of business handled through the Wenatchee yard testifies to the fact that Boyd lives up to his statement. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 1, 1925

Few towns in the country can boast as fine a general merchandise store as the new company institution in Burnett. Spacious and modern in every respect, the new store, under the direction of Manager L.W. Foreman is proving its worth to the community, and in turn the citizens of the camp are demonstrating their appreciation of the service by a constantly increasing patronage.

The Burnett store was opened in the new location early in November. Its well displayed stock, attractive windows, and showcases, must be seen to be appreciated. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 25, 1924

Another Christmas is here, the season of all the year when human hearts are warmest. With the passing of another milestone the bonds of friendship and mutual understanding between all members of The Pacific Coast family are still more closely knit by the knowledge of obstacles overcome together and confident prospects of continued success in the days ahead.

To those who are celebrating their fourth Yuletide at the camps; and to the newest men and their families, as well as to all who have been a part of the company for years past; we wish to convey our cordial best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

E.C. Ward, President (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 19, 1924

Olaf Bodding, of the Bodding Transfer Co., Juneau, Alaska, is here seen with his team, ready to deliver a ton of Black Diamond screened coal, sacked, to a customer who lives half way up the mountain. That the problem of delivering coal in Juneau, especially half way up the mountain, is somewhat different than might be supposed, is seen in the fact that to deliver this ton of coal the cost to the customer for delivery alone is $6, to say nothing of the cost of the coal itself.

Black Diamond coal and Diamond Briquets are both popular fuels in Juneau, according to H.G. Walmsley, agent for the Pacific Coast Coal Company there. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 12, 1924

This trade-mark of the Pacific Coast Coal Company or some modification of it, has been proposed as the ideal design for an emblem to be worn by members and past-members of the Mine and Central councils.

Ideas on the proper type of pin to be designed may be submitted for approval at the next meeting of the Central Council, December 27. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 5, 1924

This is the portal marking the main entrance to the coal mining camp of Carbonado, recently acquired by the Pacific Coast Coal Company. The camp is beautifully situated on the Carbon River, just off the main road to the Carbon Glacier on the north slope of majestic Mt. Rainier. Carbonado is approximately 50 miles from Seattle, on the Northern Pacific Railway, the tracks of which appear in the foreground. (more…)

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