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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Bulletin’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 19, 1924

Steamships of the Nippon Yusen Kaisha line have been coming into Seattle for more than twenty-five years, in fact, this famous line was the first to establish regular service between Puget Sound ports and the Orient. Recognizing the superior qualities of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal for bunkering purposes, the vessels of the N.Y.K. fleet have frequently coaled at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers.

The accompanying half-tone is a reproduction of a photograph taken of the Shidzuoka Maru while loading 1,000 tons of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal at the company bunkers last week. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 12, 1924

Summer time in Juneau, Alaska, is not the most favorable season in which to sell coal to the domestic consumer. But the view shown herewith of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Juneau depot, taken in the month of July, shows not a truck in sight. This is because Agent H.G. Walmsley had them all out making deliveries, even though the mid-day sun made a shady corner most inviting. “Walms” was formerly a company employee at Newcastle. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 5, 1924

Getting the best results at the lowest cost from the proper burning of coal was the theme of the appeal made by the Washington Coal Producers’ Association in its exhibit at the recent Merchants’ Convention in Seattle. Using the slogan, “There’s a Washington Coal for Every Purpose,” the exhibit attracted wide attention.

Pacific Coast coals and Diamond Briquets occupied prominent positions in the exhibit. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 29, 1924

Making hay while the sun shines is a motto which J.F. Torrence, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company depot at Tacoma, believes in putting into practice.

Consequently, when coal orders slumped during the hot weather of July he fitted up the office with extra typewriters and employed ten young ladies to operate them until a total of 15,000 letters had been written, addressed and mailed, admonishing an equal number of Tacomans to follow the example of the thrifty and and lay in a winter’s supply of fuel before the chill winds of winter found them with empty coal bins.

The influx of orders which followed necessitated the putting on of another truck to make deliveries. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 22, 1924

Rendering everything from classic selections and overtures to modern waltzes and jazz numbers, the Newcastle Band provided a musical program of exceptional excellence at the Western Washington Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet in Carbonado.

Under the able direction of Bandmaster Archie Johnson the Newcastle Band is much in demand at all social events in the camp. This picture shows the band playing on the field at Carbonado. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 2, 2003

By Kathleen Kear

Members of the Black Diamond Museum putting finishing touches on their ‘train’ float for the parade. (L-R) Don Mason, Dorothy & Howard Betts, and Dee Israel.

Members of the Black Diamond Museum putting finishing touches on their ‘train’ float for the parade. (L-R) Don Mason, Dorothy & Howard Betts, and Dee Israel.

Steeping in rich memories of yesteryear is the City of Black Diamond with its numerous parades, picnics, games and family activities, which were held in the city not only on Labor Day, but also the Fourth of July.

This Labor Day weekend, August 30–September 1, 2003, the City of Black Diamond once again celebrated with family and friends the final weekend marking the end of summer vacation and the start of school. It also honored the memory of the many men and women who worked hard in shaping Black Diamond to what it has become today.

As part of the weekend celebration, there was a parade, any number of games, a teen dance, barbecue dinner, pancake breakfast, car show, and a number of other activities geared for the whole family to enjoy.

Although recent memory identifies the time of celebration with family and friends with the Labor Day weekend, moving back to the turn of the century put the gathering of family and friends at the Fourth of July. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 8, 1924

Everywhere in the mines of Western Washington, and particularly in the mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, there is much stress placed on safety work. As a result the number of serious accidents is kept down to a minimum.

This scene shows the precautions taken to support the roof while the miner operates the “slugger” in undercutting the coal. As he prefers not to reveal his identity, we leave it to you to guess the name of this “Safety First” miner. (more…)

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