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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Bulletin’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 18, 1923

When those who had gathered at Burnett last Thursday, to attend the monthly meeting of the Store Department, checked up after all were seated around the dinner table it was discovered that all records had been broken in the number attending, a count showing 52 present. After an excellent dinner, prepared and served by Chef Emil Bernhard and his assistants, an instructive and enjoyable program of talks was attentively listened to.

J.C. Hinckley of the West Coast Grocery Co., Tacoma, led off with a very able talk of an inspirational nature. He was followed by L.W. Foreman, the new manager of Burnett store, who briefly outlined his program for the development of trade. R.A. Krebs, manager of Newcastle store, then read a paper dealing with salesmanship, which was followed by a talk on “Some Knotty Problems” by H.M. McDowell, manager of Black Diamond store. McDowell’s talk provoked an extended discussion of various problems met with daily in the company stores. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 11, 1923

Thirteen years ago the present rock dump of Mine 11, at Black Diamond, was begun. Though the mine had been in operation for many years prior to 1910, it was then that the present dump was started when the old dump caught fire. This dump is today an imposing pile of rock and waste material brought out of the mine, and it is constantly growing.

Like a small mountain it rises out of the wide expanse of the valley and is visible for a considerable distance. At night the numerous fires which blaze constantly from its base to its summit make it loom up much after the manner of the biblical Pillar of Fire. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 4, 1923

Indication of the wide-spreading use of Diamond Briquets is seen in the growing demand for this fuel for consumption in the smudge pots of Yakima Valley orchards. Each spring, during the budding and blossoming season, Yakima orchardists strive to save their crops from the ravages of late frosts by the use of smudge pots placed beneath the flower-laden trees. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 27, 1923

This group shows some of the supervisors at Black Diamond Mine upon whose shoulders falls much of the responsibility for getting out the coal. From left to right, standing, Fireboss Henry Becker, Supt. J.J. Jones, Fireboss Gomer Evans, Lampman Elmer Hyneman, and Fireboss Richard Barry. Kneeling in front are Mine Foreman Dave Hughes and Mine Foreman Theo. Rouse. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 20, 1923

Several months ago a considerable shipment of Black Diamond coal was dispatched to points in Alaska and even to scattered government stations up beyond the Arctic Circle. Now the other extreme is reached, with three whalers in this week for bunkers to take them to the Antarctic.

Each of the whalers goes by the name of Star, being also numbered 1, 2, and 3. They loaded Black Diamond and South Prairie steam coal, and will sail from Seattle, via Honolulu and Australia, for the South Polar regions. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Northwest Post Card Club newsletter; July, August, September 2017

By Ken Jensen

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

For the miners and their families in turn-of-the-century Black Diamond—an isolated company town near the Cascade foothills of South King County, Washington—the 33-mile trip to Seattle was an all-day journey. The company’s railroad and circa 1885 depot, along with its general store, were the townspeople’s only real connection to the outside world.

In 1904 the Pacific Coast Co. owned all of Black Diamond—its mines, its land, its stores, pretty much everything—as well as neighboring Franklin and a handful of other King and Pierce county towns. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 13, 1923

This picture was taken the day the Black Diamond Mine Rescue and First Aid team arrived home from Salt Lake City, where they captured third place in the combination score against the picked teams of the nation. (more…)

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