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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Company’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1904

The Pacific Coast Company has inaugurated an eight-hour day and raised wages of all laborers in its mines.

The changes are made effective October 1.

The increase is voluntary on the part of the company and was made without application by the men. In fact, the first intimation the men had of the changed conditions was given when notices were posted under the direction of Chief Engineer James Anderson announcing the higher scale was effective. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Northwest Post Card Club newsletter; July, August, September 2017

By Ken Jensen

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

For the miners and their families in turn-of-the-century Black Diamond—an isolated company town near the Cascade foothills of South King County, Washington—the 33-mile trip to Seattle was an all-day journey. The company’s railroad and circa 1885 depot, along with its general store, were the townspeople’s only real connection to the outside world.

In 1904 the Pacific Coast Co. owned all of Black Diamond—its mines, its land, its stores, pretty much everything—as well as neighboring Franklin and a handful of other King and Pierce county towns. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 19, 1919

Take first place when total average counted—will go to Pittsburgh

A safety mine car invented by Joe Klansnic, circa 1920.

A safety mine car invented by Joe Klansnic, circa 1920.

A team from the Roslyn Fuel Company’s mine at Jonesville won the mine rescue and first aid contest at Black Diamond yesterday and will be sent to Pittsburgh to compete in the national mining competitions September 30 and October 1. The Roslyn team was not a good finished [sic] in the mine rescue work, but was so nearly perfect in first aid work that it overcame the early handicap and finished in front on general average. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 11, 1913

Men employed in collieries of Pacific Coast Company quit in sympathy with discharged committeeman

Organization growing about Black Diamond

Seven hundred miners employed in the three collieries of the Pacific Coast Company at Black Diamond walked out this morning because the company had refused to reinstate George Ayers, a member of the “pit committee,” reputed to be an I.W.W. organizer in the Black Diamond district.

Ayers was discharged following a quarrel with a subforman named Mitchell, with whom he had taken up a grievance of a miner who had not been supplied with a “bucker.” Ayers is said to have become abusive when Mitchell told him that he had no authority to regulate employment. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 3, 1913

iwwMembers of the United Mine Workers of America, having unionized practically all the collieries in this state, may have to clash with the I.W.W. [Industrial Workers of the World] to retain control of the west side camps.

According to mine employees and operators the I.W.W. is attempting to force its way into the mining camps, but thus far has made no marked headway. The union officials believe that the I.W.W. will be no more popular in the mining camps than it has been among loggers, and during the past year I.W.W. organizers have been chased out of the logging camps by the men themselves. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 19, 1923

Another instance of what is being done constantly all over the Northwest to sell the products of the Pacific Coast Coal Company mines is shown in the cut above. This shows a booth arranged by the Pacific Coast Coal agency in Everett at a Household Appliance Show a short time ago.

Note the slogan, “We Can Make It Hot for You,” and below the grate filled with burning Diamond Briquets. In a briquet guessing contest conducted by the company in connection with the exhibit, more than 1,800 contestants entered, most of who made good prospects for business. Charles O. Hilen is the manager of the Everett agency. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, July 2, 1898

His defense that the explosion was not a serious one, and that therefore failure to report to the state mine inspector was not a violation of the law, fails to satisfy Justice Frank B. Ingersoll

C.C. Anderson, superintendent of the Franklin coal mine, was bound over to the superior court yesterday afternoon by Justice of the Peace Ingersoll, to answer the charge of failure to report forthwith to the state mine inspector a gas explosion in which two men were alleged to have been seriously injured. (more…)

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