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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Company’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 27, 1906

Georgetown controversy likely to be renewed with Columbia & Puget Sound takes advantage of franchise

Roads insist upon overhead crossing to do away with danger of injury through collision with trains

The controversy between the Northern Pacific and the town of Georgetown may be repeated when the Columbia & Puget Sound attempts to double-track its line between Seattle and Black River Junction. The Columbia & Puget Sound must lay a second track across Rainier Avenue and has a franchise, granted by the county commissioners prior to the incorporation of Georgetown, authorizing the work.

As soon as the Pacific Coast Company, which owns the Columbia & Puget Sound, completes estimates of cost, the coal road will begin laying tracks. The system will act under its franchise rights, but there may follow protests from Georgetown. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 16, 1911

With price of $50 to murder fellowman, Italian’s hand flutters and he temporizes with intended victim

Above are shown the Vella brothers and below is a picture of Cosenza, whom the brothers hired Arena to kill.

Two agree to split purse to be paid

Four men now in jail while sheriff’s deputies have narrow escape from engaging in death duel

Fifty dollars is the price of a human life, disposed with Camorra-like methods, in the county of King, according to the remarkable disclosures of Joe Cosenza, a coal miner whose life was spared by the weakening of the hired assassin.

In the arrest of the alleged plotters, in a mining hamlet shack at Franklin, Deputy Sheriff Scott Malone and City Detective Joe Bianchi had the closest calls of their lives early this morning, for Thomas Vella, Italian, and the two officers stood with revolvers leveled at one another for a minute, each trying to force the other to back down. The Italian’s nerve finally failed. (more…)

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Originally published in “Now & Then,” The Seattle Times, March 26, 2000

By Paul Dorpat

At the foot of Dearborn Street, the Pacific Coast Company coal wharf extended far into Elliott Bay. Here, freshly painted and nearly new, the wharf is a year or two old. The scene dates from about 1903. (Courtesy of Lawton Gowey)

For soaring grandeur, the two towers of Pacific Coast Company’s coal wharf at the foot of Dearborn Street may be compared to the contemporary gantry cranes of the Port of Seattle’s Pier 46 complex. The open skeleton of the old coal towers suggests the stone filigree of a medieval cathedral, and the sublime symmetry strengthens this allusion.

Both the Cottage City and S.S. Garonne, the steamers left and right of the coal towers, had busy careers in Alaska. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 28, 1926

New Black Diamond Mine was visited by the representatives of the Sales Department as a part of the two-day program last week. In the mine the salesmen saw visual evidence of the company’s confidence in the future of the coal industry. The picture of the group was taken at the face of the gangway after they had walked in from the main entrance. (more…)

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Originally published in The Issaquah Press, January 28, 2009

This was likely taken in the 1910s. It came from a book of photos of all of Pacific Coast Co. properties, including this mine property held by its subsidiary, Pacific Coast Coal Co. (Issaquah History Museums)

Coal mining led to Issaquah’s transformation from farming community to bustling town.

The industry brought hundreds of workers to Issaquah; the growth continued as businessmen established banks, shops, and other services. Issaquah miners were all ages and came from all across the world, drawn to the area by the promise of employment—at wages higher than that of East Coast miners.

In 1900, just over 60 percent of Issaquah’s workforce was employed in coal mines. About half of these men lived with their families, often in housing rented to them by the mining company. Others were single or separated from their family and lived as boarders in one of Issaquah’s many hotels. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 14, 1926

This Link-Belt moveable crane is used at the Briquet Plant not only to load Diamond Briquets from the storage platform into the cars, but also to load coal from the storage piles into cars preparatory to sending it through the plant. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 10, 1906

Information secured by Milwaukee railroad from engineering crews now indicates that route is best

Surveyors kept in the mountains and are continuing investigations of all possible means of reaching coast

Heavy snows retarding final examination and definite announcement cannot be made until all reports are in

The Milwaukee railroad will use, according to indications, Snoqualmie Pass in crossing the Cascade Mountains, entering Seattle by way of the Cedar River Valley. If this route is finally accepted by the Milwaukee the new transcontinental line will parallel the Columbia & Puget Sound from Maple Valley into Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, October 30, 1906

While famine is threatened in this city coal mine owners are first supplying the wants of San Francisco and Alaska—output also being curtailed

Seattle is threatened by a coal famine. Already prices of coal have been raised so that today Seattle householders are paying from $1 to $2 more per ton than they were two months ago. The excuse given for this raise is that there is today a shortage of coal.

To old customers coal dealers are suggesting that if they would not suffer later in the winter orders for a full season’s supply should be given at once. The Star has endeavored to discover the cause of this shortage and probable famine. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 15, 1925

Prize livestock and big pumpkins were not the only attractions at the recent State Fair held at Yakima, as the booth pictured herewith will attest. John Ryczek, resident agent for the Pacific Coast Coal Company in Yakima, writes the Bulletin that the Diamond Briquets and the peaches, both varieties, attracted wide attention.

Over the picture of the alluring young ladies at the left, the sign reads. “These Peaches will not freeze, they use Diamond Briquets,” while at the right above the plates of fruit is the inscription, “These Peaches did not freeze, they used Diamond Briquets.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, August 28, 1947

Shell Oil Company seismograph crew working in Enumclaw area

Shell Oil Company leasing land in area north and northwest of Enumclaw preparatory to drilling for oil; expect real test of oil possibilities in area if Shell Company drills

Late Wednesday the Shell Oil Company, Inc., issued a press release in which they announced the company had acquired considerable acreage in the Black Diamond area from the Pacific Coast Company, Northern Pacific, and other large land holders. They also stated that drilling would start in a few days with the Crissman Drilling Company engaged to do the drilling. This is the first try for oil that the Shell Oil Company has made in the Pacific Northwest. (more…)

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