Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Company’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 19, 1906

Pacific Coast Co. and Northern Pacific may come under provisions which prohibit carriers operating plants

Shipments outside Washington forbidden by the operators, but Hill line will me most seriously hurt by rule; Piles made fight to help local industries and Portland coal market to suffer if supply must be cut off

If the House agrees to the amendment made by the United States senate, forbidding common carriers from hauling coal mined in their own properties to points outside the state, the Pacific Coast Company and Northern Pacific will be seriously affected.

It was to save the coal properties of these two lines that United States Senator S.H. Piles is understood to have introduced his amendment exempting lines whose principal business is not that of a common carrier.

Just how this would have helped the Northern Pacific is not clear, but it would have been of some advantage to the Pacific Coast Company. That it was lost is believed by railroad men to have been due to the necessity for regulating the anthracite roads. The Pacific Coast Company can probably escape the provisions of the bill, but it will be a more expensive task to market the coal of that corporation. The Northern Pacific is expected to be compelled to limit its market to this state. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 26, 1925

Walter Burnum, recently elected president of The Pacific Coast Co.

Walter Burnum, recently elected president of The Pacific Coast Co.

As is generally known among the employees, the Pacific Coast Coal Company is owned and operated by The Pacific Coast Company, of which Mr. Wm. M. Barnum of New York has for many years been president, and Mr. Walter Barnum, treasurer. Mr. E.C. Ward is president of the former and vice-president of the latter. Mr. Walter Barnum has now been elected to the presidency of The Pacific Coast Company, and Mr. Wm. M. Barnum continues as a director of the company and in close association with its affairs.

Both of these Eastern officials have been in Seattle for the past week on their semi-annual visit of inspection, and they will probably remain here until the end of the month. They, with Mr. Ward and other local officials, are visiting each of the mine operations.

The new president is intimately familiar with all of the company’s activities, and enjoys a wide acquaintance among the employees, having been a regular visitor at the mines for many years past. On this, as well as former trips, he has extended his personal inspection into the underground workings of the mines, in the activities of which he takes a keen interest.

He is also closely identified with the larger coal problems of the nation, being vice-president of the National Coal Association which embraces in its membership most of the principal operators of the United States. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 19, 1925

Here is shown a shipment of asphalt on the pier ready for loading into Pacific Coast box cars for shipment to the Briquet Plant. Asphalt is used in the manufacture of Diamond Briquets to bind the finely pulverized South Prairie and Black Diamond coal together. It is shipped from California by water in barrels.

When ready for melting at the Briquet Plant the barrels are broken up and the staves burned, as there is no method by which the hardened asphalt can be removed without destroying the container. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, March 2007

Howard Botts

Howard Botts

Black Diamond is my favorite subject since I’ve lived there all my life. I think these two towns, Maple Valley and Black Diamond, have some things in common; a couple of them are Highway 169 and railroads.

People in Seattle heard that the Northern Pacific was coming to this area and going to Tacoma.

They felt if they couldn’t have that they were going to build their own railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla over the pass. So they started in 1873, got as far as Renton in 1876; then extended it to Newcastle. In 1880 Henry Villard, of the Northern Pacific, bought it from the Black Diamond Coal Company and renamed it the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Daily Times, February 24, 1929

Men who have made the new plant possible: 1—Wylie Hemphill, vice president and sales manager, and W.H. Green, plant manager. 2—Executives of cement company and affiliated companies. Left are, Carl English; purchasing agent; S.E. Hutton; research engineer; Thomas Reeder, assistant sales manager, Pacific Coast Coal Company; Walter Barnum, president Pacific Coast Company; E.F. De Grandpre, manager company hotels and real estate; E.C. Ward, vice president; Mr. Green; N.D. Moore, vice president; Ray Smith. engineer; H.M. Watkins, secretary and treasurer; A.F. Marion, manager steamship and engineering companies; W.A. Wilson, superintendent of mines; Darwin Meisnest, assistant sales manager cement company, and Mr. Hemphill. 3—Mr. Hemphill, Mr. Meisnest, and Ray Larson, Anchorage, Alaska, with latter signing order for first shipment to Alaska.

Men who have made the new plant possible: 1—Wylie Hemphill, vice president and sales manager, and W.H. Green, plant manager. 2—Executives of cement company and affiliated companies. Left are, Carl English, purchasing agent; S.E. Hutton, research engineer; Thomas Reeder, assistant sales manager, Pacific Coast Coal Company; Walter Barnum, president Pacific Coast Company; E.F. De Grandpre, manager company hotels and real estate; E.C. Ward, vice president; Mr. Green; N.D. Moore, vice president; Ray Smith. engineer; H.M. Watkins, secretary and treasurer; A.F. Marion, manager steamship and engineering companies; W.A. Wilson, superintendent of mines; Darwin Meisnest, assistant sales manager cement company, and Mr. Hemphill. 3—Mr. Hemphill, Mr. Meisnest, and Ray Larson, Anchorage, Alaska, with latter signing order for first shipment to Alaska.

First carload is sent on its way in record time

Gratifying accomplishment is recorded in ten months; Seattle leaders watch first shipment go

Rivaling the exploits of Aladdin’s genie, is the accomplishment of the officials of the Pacific Coast Cement Company, whose big, million-barrel capacity Portland cement plant made its first shipment of Diamond Cement last Friday, just ten months from the date that construction of the plant started on the twenty-acre site which it occupies on East Marginal Way. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 19, 1925

Tramways and aerial cables are common sights around metal mines, but it’s uncommon to find a coal mine with its entrance 450 feet below the level of the surrounding country. The above view shows the “incline” at Carbonado, a 35-degree pitch, down which all supplies and the daily shifts are lowered and raised.

Carbonado Comments

Carbonado victor in soccer battle

Battling the valiant Newcastle soccer eleven, the Carbonado squad last Sunday put up such a fight that the score ended 4 to 0, with the Carbon lads on the long end. Carbonado played a fast game.

Newcastle put up a fair defense, but with a number of new men, and also handicapped by a recent period of idleness, the Coal Creek team could make little headway against the strong Carbon defense. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 25, 1924

Another Christmas is here, the season of all the year when human hearts are warmest. With the passing of another milestone the bonds of friendship and mutual understanding between all members of The Pacific Coast family are still more closely knit by the knowledge of obstacles overcome together and confident prospects of continued success in the days ahead.

To those who are celebrating their fourth Yuletide at the camps; and to the newest men and their families, as well as to all who have been a part of the company for years past; we wish to convey our cordial best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

E.C. Ward, President (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »