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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Company’

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 20, 1924

When the man-trip starts down the slope at Newcastle Mine the men who are going on shift are always ready and waiting. This group was caught by the photographer just before they went on shift. In the front row can be seen H.G. Hagenbush, B.E. Van Alstine, A.C. Marsh, Frank Oriet, Walter Trover, Joe Daler, Otto Sproat, Victor Nelson, Robt. Joughin, and Geo. Brandon. In the back are A.L. Richards, Wm. Eddy, V.J. Ryan, Frank Hollands, and H.S. Syverson. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 6, 1924

Pacific Coast coal was used to bunker the vessels of three foreign flags within the past week. First to call was the Nazareno, an Italian freighter under charter to the Bunge Western Grain Corporation. She is shown above to the left just as the big craft was being brought alongside the bunkers for loading. Her destination after leaving Seattle was Europe, though at this writing she is ashore in the Columbia River.

The center picture shows the Wilhelm Hemsoth, a German ship, taking Black Diamond and South Prairie bunker coal. She sails this week for Australia.

At the right the graceful lines of the British freighter, Dramatist, show up to good advantage as she pulls out for Glasgow. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 5, 1919

Issaquah coal mine, one of the Pacific Coast Company’s many properties

Issaquah coal mine, one of the Pacific Coast Company’s many properties

Employing a whole army of 2,500 persons—operating four different companies—and maintaining a payroll of approximately $4,000,000 a year—the Pacific Coast Company is one of the great corporations contributing to the prosperity and growth of Seattle and the Pacific Northwest. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 30, 1924

One institution of which Burnett is justly proud is the company store, a picture of which is herewith shown. L.W. Foreman is the capable and accommodating manager of the store and with his efficient corps of helpers he is making it an institution of real service to the camp.

A prompt delivery service is maintained, which with the high quality of the merchandise carried, is another one of the reasons for the general appeal of the company store to all residents of Burnett. (more…)

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