Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Company’

Originally published in The Seattle Star, October 30, 1906

While famine is threatened in this city coal mine owners are first supplying the wants of San Francisco and Alaska—output also being curtailed

Seattle is threatened by a coal famine. Already prices of coal have been raised so that today Seattle householders are paying from $1 to $2 more per ton than they were two months ago. The excuse given for this raise is that there is today a shortage of coal.

To old customers coal dealers are suggesting that if they would not suffer later in the winter orders for a full season’s supply should be given at once. The Star has endeavored to discover the cause of this shortage and probable famine. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 15, 1925

Prize livestock and big pumpkins were not the only attractions at the recent State Fair held at Yakima, as the booth pictured herewith will attest. John Ryczek, resident agent for the Pacific Coast Coal Company in Yakima, writes the Bulletin that the Diamond Briquets and the peaches, both varieties, attracted wide attention.

Over the picture of the alluring young ladies at the left, the sign reads. “These Peaches will not freeze, they use Diamond Briquets,” while at the right above the plates of fruit is the inscription, “These Peaches did not freeze, they used Diamond Briquets.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, August 28, 1947

Shell Oil Company seismograph crew working in Enumclaw area

Shell Oil Company leasing land in area north and northwest of Enumclaw preparatory to drilling for oil; expect real test of oil possibilities in area if Shell Company drills

Late Wednesday the Shell Oil Company, Inc., issued a press release in which they announced the company had acquired considerable acreage in the Black Diamond area from the Pacific Coast Company, Northern Pacific, and other large land holders. They also stated that drilling would start in a few days with the Crissman Drilling Company engaged to do the drilling. This is the first try for oil that the Shell Oil Company has made in the Pacific Northwest. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 20, 1925

Black Diamond was visited last Saturday by Mr. Walter Barnum, president of The Pacific Coast Company, and Mr. E.C. Ward, president of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, together with vice-presidents N.D. Moore, Wylie Hemphill, and a party of staff officials.

In the absence of James Justice, Alternate Mine Council Chairman who was on shift in the mine at the time, A.W. Gray, former chairman, welcomed the officials to the camp, in which he was joined by Supt. Paul Gallagher.

The Bulletin photographer caught Mr. Gray, Pres. Barnum, Supt. Gallagher, and Pres. Ward in the order shown in the halftone above. (more…)

Read Full Post »

By Bill Kombol

King County Assessor tax parcel No. 112106-9035

The location of the Black Diamond branch of Mount Rainier Bank [Columbia Bank, 2019] has a short, but interesting history.

The property is located in the south half of Section 11, Township 21 North, Range 6 East, W.M. Like all odd-numbered sections in this area, the property in Section 11 was originally part of a land grant by the United States to the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1873 for construction of a transcontinental railroad. In adjacent even-numbered sections, the Black Diamond Coal Mining Company had begun mining coal after moving their operations north from the Mount Diablo coal fields near Nortonville, California, east of San Francisco. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 19, 1906

Pacific Coast Co. and Northern Pacific may come under provisions which prohibit carriers operating plants

Shipments outside Washington forbidden by the operators, but Hill line will me most seriously hurt by rule; Piles made fight to help local industries and Portland coal market to suffer if supply must be cut off

If the House agrees to the amendment made by the United States senate, forbidding common carriers from hauling coal mined in their own properties to points outside the state, the Pacific Coast Company and Northern Pacific will be seriously affected.

It was to save the coal properties of these two lines that United States Senator S.H. Piles is understood to have introduced his amendment exempting lines whose principal business is not that of a common carrier.

Just how this would have helped the Northern Pacific is not clear, but it would have been of some advantage to the Pacific Coast Company. That it was lost is believed by railroad men to have been due to the necessity for regulating the anthracite roads. The Pacific Coast Company can probably escape the provisions of the bill, but it will be a more expensive task to market the coal of that corporation. The Northern Pacific is expected to be compelled to limit its market to this state. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 26, 1925

Walter Burnum, recently elected president of The Pacific Coast Co.

Walter Burnum, recently elected president of The Pacific Coast Co.

As is generally known among the employees, the Pacific Coast Coal Company is owned and operated by The Pacific Coast Company, of which Mr. Wm. M. Barnum of New York has for many years been president, and Mr. Walter Barnum, treasurer. Mr. E.C. Ward is president of the former and vice-president of the latter. Mr. Walter Barnum has now been elected to the presidency of The Pacific Coast Company, and Mr. Wm. M. Barnum continues as a director of the company and in close association with its affairs.

Both of these Eastern officials have been in Seattle for the past week on their semi-annual visit of inspection, and they will probably remain here until the end of the month. They, with Mr. Ward and other local officials, are visiting each of the mine operations.

The new president is intimately familiar with all of the company’s activities, and enjoys a wide acquaintance among the employees, having been a regular visitor at the mines for many years past. On this, as well as former trips, he has extended his personal inspection into the underground workings of the mines, in the activities of which he takes a keen interest.

He is also closely identified with the larger coal problems of the nation, being vice-president of the National Coal Association which embraces in its membership most of the principal operators of the United States. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »