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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Engineering Co.’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 17, 1925

Everybody in Burnett knows something about First Aid work, but none are more expert than are the members of the Women’s First Aid Team. In the photograph they are shown demonstrating how to resuscitate a person overcome by gas or drowning. Mrs. F.A. White is the captain of the team, the other members including, Mrs. L.G. Payne, Mrs. Frank Seltenreich, Mrs. James Smith, Mrs. A.L. McBlaine, Mrs. L.G. Bean, and Mrs. J.L. Hill. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 18, 1925

More than a mile from the entrance to the tunnel, the Bulletin photographer secured this picture in the Carbonado Mine when the Bruiser Seam was visited by a party of newspaper men last Monday. At the extreme left Supt S.H. Ash is seen telling Nettie Gilpatrick to watch the two miners, if she wants to learn how to dig coal. There being no gas in this tunnel, open flame lights are employed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Times, February 24, 1929

Men who have made the new plant possible: 1—Wylie Hemphill, vice president and sales manager, and W.H. Green, plant manager. 2—Executives of cement company and affiliated companies. Left are, Carl English; purchasing agent; S.E. Hutton; research engineer; Thomas Reeder, assistant sales manager, Pacific Coast Coal Company; Walter Barnum, president Pacific Coast Company; E.F. De Grandpre, manager company hotels and real estate; E.C. Ward, vice president; Mr. Green; N.D. Moore, vice president; Ray Smith. engineer; H.M. Watkins, secretary and treasurer; A.F. Marion, manager steamship and engineering companies; W.A. Wilson, superintendent of mines; Darwin Meisnest, assistant sales manager cement company, and Mr. Hemphill. 3—Mr. Hemphill, Mr. Meisnest, and Ray Larson, Anchorage, Alaska, with latter signing order for first shipment to Alaska.

Men who have made the new plant possible: 1—Wylie Hemphill, vice president and sales manager, and W.H. Green, plant manager. 2—Executives of cement company and affiliated companies. Left are, Carl English, purchasing agent; S.E. Hutton, research engineer; Thomas Reeder, assistant sales manager, Pacific Coast Coal Company; Walter Barnum, president Pacific Coast Company; E.F. De Grandpre, manager company hotels and real estate; E.C. Ward, vice president; Mr. Green; N.D. Moore, vice president; Ray Smith. engineer; H.M. Watkins, secretary and treasurer; A.F. Marion, manager steamship and engineering companies; W.A. Wilson, superintendent of mines; Darwin Meisnest, assistant sales manager cement company, and Mr. Hemphill. 3—Mr. Hemphill, Mr. Meisnest, and Ray Larson, Anchorage, Alaska, with latter signing order for first shipment to Alaska.

First carload is sent on its way in record time

Gratifying accomplishment is recorded in ten months; Seattle leaders watch first shipment go

Rivaling the exploits of Aladdin’s genie, is the accomplishment of the officials of the Pacific Coast Cement Company, whose big, million-barrel capacity Portland cement plant made its first shipment of Diamond Cement last Friday, just ten months from the date that construction of the plant started on the twenty-acre site which it occupies on East Marginal Way. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 17, 1924

One feature of the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers on Seattle Harbor, not found in many other ports, is the fact that deep sea vessels may get prompt repairs, when necessary, while bunker coal is being loaded. Immediately adjacent to the bunkers are the large shops of the Pacific Coast Engineering Company, a subsidiary of The Pacific Coast Company, whose trained men and modern equipment are capable of handling any marine repair work except dry docking.

This work is frequently performed while the ship is loading coal, and the vessel can remain in the same slip until the job is completed without interfering with other operations. The picture shows the Westward Ho, an 8,800-ton U.S. Shipping Board carrier, taking on bunkers while undergoing extensive alterations at the same time by the Pacific Coast Engineering Company. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 26, 1924

Diamond Briquets were recently given wide and favorable publicity in Juneau, Alaska, when Harold Lloyd appeared in the film feature, Why Worry, at one of the Juneau theatres. H.G. Walmsley, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s depot at the Alaskan capital, arranged with the exhibitors of this picture to place fifteen of these 16-foot signs about the city.

Dealers handling Diamond Briquets, from Skagway, Alaska, in the north, to Hornbrook, California, in the south, all report no worries with this popular fuel. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 2, 2003

By Kathleen Kear

Members of the Black Diamond Museum putting finishing touches on their ‘train’ float for the parade. (L-R) Don Mason, Dorothy & Howard Betts, and Dee Israel.

Members of the Black Diamond Museum putting finishing touches on their ‘train’ float for the parade. (L-R) Don Mason, Dorothy & Howard Betts, and Dee Israel.

Steeping in rich memories of yesteryear is the City of Black Diamond with its numerous parades, picnics, games and family activities, which were held in the city not only on Labor Day, but also the Fourth of July.

This Labor Day weekend, August 30–September 1, 2003, the City of Black Diamond once again celebrated with family and friends the final weekend marking the end of summer vacation and the start of school. It also honored the memory of the many men and women who worked hard in shaping Black Diamond to what it has become today.

As part of the weekend celebration, there was a parade, any number of games, a teen dance, barbecue dinner, pancake breakfast, car show, and a number of other activities geared for the whole family to enjoy.

Although recent memory identifies the time of celebration with family and friends with the Labor Day weekend, moving back to the turn of the century put the gathering of family and friends at the Fourth of July. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 6, 1924

Pacific Coast coal was used to bunker the vessels of three foreign flags within the past week. First to call was the Nazareno, an Italian freighter under charter to the Bunge Western Grain Corporation. She is shown above to the left just as the big craft was being brought alongside the bunkers for loading. Her destination after leaving Seattle was Europe, though at this writing she is ashore in the Columbia River.

The center picture shows the Wilhelm Hemsoth, a German ship, taking Black Diamond and South Prairie bunker coal. She sails this week for Australia.

At the right the graceful lines of the British freighter, Dramatist, show up to good advantage as she pulls out for Glasgow. (more…)

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