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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Railroad’

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 2007

Story and photos by Barbara Nilson

Paul Bartholomew and his daughter, Karen Lindquist, stand in front of the foundation for the press factory that made clay pipe.

The daffodils are blooming in Taylor as they do every spring to welcome back those who have fond memories of living there when it was a booming coal and clay company town. Taylor existed from 1892-1947, when the Seattle Public Utilities formed the Cedar River Watershed and closed the area to the public.

Each April the Utility District and Friends of the Cedar River Watershed offer the walking tour into Taylor for two weekends at a cost of $15. Participants gather at the Cedar River Watershed Visitors/Education Center for a slideshow of early day Taylor, then climb into vans for the 10-mile drive to the site.

The Education Center has interpretive exhibits that show where our water comes from and historical materials about the watershed area. It is an interesting place to browse anytime of the year. I especially like the musical artwork in the rain drum court where drops of water play tunes on the various drums. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 18, 1925

More than a mile from the entrance to the tunnel, the Bulletin photographer secured this picture in the Carbonado Mine when the Bruiser Seam was visited by a party of newspaper men last Monday. At the extreme left Supt S.H. Ash is seen telling Nettie Gilpatrick to watch the two miners, if she wants to learn how to dig coal. There being no gas in this tunnel, open flame lights are employed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 11, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. tour.

More than four hundred Seattle women, members of the Parent-Teacher Associations of the city, spent one hour and 25 minutes at the Briquet Plant of the Pacific Coast Coal Company last Monday. They were enroute to the Newcastle Mine, but the special train of six coaches stopped at the Briquet Plant long enough to enable Supt. Geo. N. Calkins and Foreman Clarence Gorst to show them the entire intricate process of manufacturing Diamond Briquets.

After following the raw Black Diamond and South Prairie coal through the plant to where it emerged a perfectly blended fuel in the form of briquets, the party paused by this storage pile of 12,000 tons to have its picture taken. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 4, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

More than million briquets made daily

In 1914 the Briquet Plant was opened and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that more than one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, May 1997

By Colin McDonald

In January and February of 1938, Bill Iverson and I were hired by the Baldridge Logging Co. to fire their donkey which was located near the top of Taylor Mountain.

I told this to a person who didn’t know anything about logging. I said, “We had to get up early to steam up the donkey before the crew arrived.” He replied, “What did you do? Run him around in a corral?” He thought we were using a four-legged donkey. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 23, 1925

Years ago, the railroad depot was the most popular place in every small city or town, and the daily arrival of the limited was an event seldom missed by the population. Automobiles and motor stages have changed all this, however, and today the highway is more popular than the railway. Nevertheless, the Pacific Coast depot at Black Diamond is still an important place in the camp, and the daily dispatching of long train loads of coal is a sight most pleasing to everyone. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, April 12, 1923

Local banks and Renton agency co-operating in new Ford plan

A new plan for purchasing Ford cars whereby prospective purchasers may avail themselves of banking facilities and start an account with which to buy a car is announced today by the Ford Motor Company and by banks with whom Ford dealers do business. (more…)

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