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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Railroad’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 5, 1919

Issaquah coal mine, one of the Pacific Coast Company’s many properties

Issaquah coal mine, one of the Pacific Coast Company’s many properties

Employing a whole army of 2,500 persons—operating four different companies—and maintaining a payroll of approximately $4,000,000 a year—the Pacific Coast Company is one of the great corporations contributing to the prosperity and growth of Seattle and the Pacific Northwest. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 30, 1924

One institution of which Burnett is justly proud is the company store, a picture of which is herewith shown. L.W. Foreman is the capable and accommodating manager of the store and with his efficient corps of helpers he is making it an institution of real service to the camp.

A prompt delivery service is maintained, which with the high quality of the merchandise carried, is another one of the reasons for the general appeal of the company store to all residents of Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 8, 1924

Not a feminine foot faltered when the guides for this group of King County P.T.A. members led the way into the dark recesses of the Primrose Tunnel at Newcastle. These women, a portion of 300 who recently visited Newcastle Mine as the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, here saw firsthand the actual processes of coal mining.

The guides for this group were, Dan Carey, Jas. E. Ash, and Phillip Chase, all of the Engineering Department. John Eck, fireboss in charge of the operations at Primrose, is kneeling at the left. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 24, 1924

Recently officials of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and representatives of Yakima Valley fruit growers conducted tests to determine the effectiveness of preventing damage to blossoming trees by the installation of Diamond Briquet burners in the orchards. The result was most satisfactory.

At the right in the above cut is shown an orchard scene with a briquet burner in the foreground. To the lower left is a truck load of Diamond Briquets being delivered in the orchard. The man in the driver’s seat is T.M. Reeder of the Sales Department. In the oval, from left to right, is N.D. Moore, vice-president Pacific Coast Coal Co.; Arthur Karr, Yakima Valley orchardist and inventor of the briquet burner; A.F. Marion, chief engineer Pacific Coast Coal Co.; T.M. Reeder of the Sales Department, and Bruce Dower of the John Dower Lumber Co., Yakima dealer for the Pacific Coast Coal Co. (more…)

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Maple Valley Historical Society, March 1987

Here’s where me and the railroad got together.

My brother went up to Maple Valley for some reason or other and saw this gang of railroad men working to save the track that was being washed out. Being nosy, he went up to the foreman and asked if they were hiring anybody and he said yes, and get anyone else you can.

He came home and got me and we started work filling gunny sacks with sand at 4:00 p.m. and didn’t stop til 4:00 p.m. the next day. The rain never let up and gunny sacks got hard to get because everyone else needed them too for the same reason we did. We wound up using sacks that had been filled with rock salt and the salt cut our hands making them very sore. We didn’t have the little bags they use nowadays but the 100-pound size which we about two-thirds filled. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 2015

By Bill Kombol

Railroads played a key role in the development of most King County towns, including Ravensdale. The arrival of the nation’s second transcontinental railway, the Northern Pacific (NP) in 1883 dramatically accelerated growth throughout the Washington Territory.

The development of a production-scale coal mine required a rail link to deliver the massive equipment needed to operate the mine and to transport the coal to market.

The extension of the Columbia and Puget Sound (C&PS) railway in 1884 from Renton by Henry Villard’s Oregon Improvement Company enabled the coal mines at Cedar Mountain (1884), Black Diamond (late 1884), Franklin (1885), and Danville (1896) to begin production. (more…)

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