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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Railroad’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 29, 1925

Gathered at the face of the rock tunnel in the New Black Diamond Mine, the men responsible for the excellent work of engineering and drilling which recently was completed there, are shown in the accompanying flashlight picture. The scene shows the men at the conclusion of drilling 28 holes in the barrier of 9½ feet of solid sandstone, which the blast broke down and connected the tunnel with the gangway which had been driven from the opposite side.

From left to right, they are; D.C. Botting, Bert Cook, Barney Doyle, F. Van Winkle, T.L. Jones (discoverer of the mine) , E.L. Fortney, foreman, L. Hayden, Jas. E. Ash, Chas. Gallagher, Ben Allen, foreman, R.W. Smith, Chas. Ryan, C. Busti. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 22, 1925

With representatives present from Renton and Seattle, together with mining men from over the state and the official family of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, the New Black Diamond Mine was formally opened last Friday, October 16.

N.D. Moore, vice-president, pulled the switch which set off the final blast breaking down the 9-foot barrier of solid rock separating the two tunnels on which work had progressed for more than a year. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, September 2007

Photo taken approximately 1935. Standing in front of house (23360 Dorre Don Way) built by Gus and Rachael on property bought from Uncle John. They purchased about 15 acres of the land that was not platted on the east side of the road. From the left, back row: William Bradford, Gus Christy; left in front row: Mary (Daniels) Bradford, Rosalie Christy, William Christy, and Rachael (Bradford) Christy. Photo loaned by Marla Young.

Thanks to Sandy Faul and Marla Young for their responses to the request in the spring Bugle for information on Dorre Don and Orchard Grove.

Marla Young e-mailed, “l saw the article in The Bugle requesting information about Dorre Don and Orchard Grove. My family lived on both the Dorre Don portion of the road and Orchard Grove for many years.

“My Great Uncle John Daniels owned all of the land now known as Orchard Grove and approximately 40 acres on the other side of the railroad. In 1919 he subdivided the land between the road and river into lots and called it Orchard Grove. Apparently, there was a remnant orchard on part of the land when he purchased the property.” (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS The Bugle, January 1995

Can you guess where and when this picture was taken?

This photograph was taken in the early 1940s by Chester Gibbon. He drove in from the Maple Valley highway on the Pipeline Road and went to the edge of the hill a little west of the point where Highway 18 now drops down into the valley.

In the foreground is Bain Road, and the Vickery and Perry homes and outbuildings. The PC [Pacific Coast] and Milwaukee trestles are at right. In the center of the picture can be seen the old grade school and the gym.

In the middle at left is the false front of the Maple Valley Tavern. An old building that served as the post office and residence of Postmistress Miriam Mahaffey is just below the school.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 6, 1925

Constant practice makes perfect, and adherence to this truth makes the Black Diamond Mine Rescue Team one of the best. This picture shows the team with its apparatus in place and ready to enter the mine where their skill would enable them to be of invaluable assistance in case of need.

A.G. Wallace, captain of the team, was a member of the Washington Champions in 1923, which went from Black Diamond to Salt Lake City, winning third prize in the International contest held there. From left to right: Joe Bisch, Joe Meza, A. McDonald, A. Kirkbride, Fred Goldner, and A.G. Wallace. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 2007

Story and photos by Barbara Nilson

Paul Bartholomew and his daughter, Karen Lindquist, stand in front of the foundation for the press factory that made clay pipe.

The daffodils are blooming in Taylor as they do every spring to welcome back those who have fond memories of living there when it was a booming coal and clay company town. Taylor existed from 1892-1947, when the Seattle Public Utilities formed the Cedar River Watershed and closed the area to the public.

Each April the Utility District and Friends of the Cedar River Watershed offer the walking tour into Taylor for two weekends at a cost of $15. Participants gather at the Cedar River Watershed Visitors/Education Center for a slideshow of early day Taylor, then climb into vans for the 10-mile drive to the site.

The Education Center has interpretive exhibits that show where our water comes from and historical materials about the watershed area. It is an interesting place to browse anytime of the year. I especially like the musical artwork in the rain drum court where drops of water play tunes on the various drums. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 18, 1925

More than a mile from the entrance to the tunnel, the Bulletin photographer secured this picture in the Carbonado Mine when the Bruiser Seam was visited by a party of newspaper men last Monday. At the extreme left Supt S.H. Ash is seen telling Nettie Gilpatrick to watch the two miners, if she wants to learn how to dig coal. There being no gas in this tunnel, open flame lights are employed. (more…)

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