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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Railroad’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1919

Hall at Newcastle’s Uniontown—Morganville’s sister “city”—which was constructed during the coal miners’ lockout in 1922. The road fronting the building is May Creek Park Dr, the road described in this article, near its junction with the Renton-Newcastle Rd—now known as Coal Creek Parkway.

Hall at Newcastle’s Uniontown—Morganville’s sister “city”—which was constructed during the coal miners’ lockout in 1922. The road in the foreground is May Creek Park Dr, the road described in this article, near its junction with the Renton-Newcastle Rd—now known as Coal Creek Parkway.

After a fight with the Board of County Commissioners that has lasted twelve years, the residents of Bartram Junction, three miles northeast of Renton on the Newcastle branch of the Pacific Coast Railroad, are to have a road outlet to the highways of the county.

The county board yesterday received from the State Public Service Commission permission to construct a temporary grade crossing over the railroad and Commissioner Thomas Dobson of the North District said today that one-half of the one-mile road from the Newcastle highway to Bartram will he constructed this year and that it will be finished next spring at an approximate cost of $2,500. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 19, 1919

Take first place when total average counted—will go to Pittsburgh

A safety mine car invented by Joe Klansnic, circa 1920.

A safety mine car invented by Joe Klansnic, circa 1920.

A team from the Roslyn Fuel Company’s mine at Jonesville won the mine rescue and first aid contest at Black Diamond yesterday and will be sent to Pittsburgh to compete in the national mining competitions September 30 and October 1. The Roslyn team was not a good finished [sic] in the mine rescue work, but was so nearly perfect in first aid work that it overcame the early handicap and finished in front on general average. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 10, 1977

Retired train dispatcher Don Vernor of Maple Valley was honored by friends and co-workers at a recent reception. He has been “on the job” here since 1945 and prior to that worked as a dispatcher and telegrapher in Nevada. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

Retired train dispatcher Don Vernor of Maple Valley was honored by friends and co-workers at a recent reception. He has been “on the job” here since 1945 and prior to that worked as a dispatcher and telegrapher in Nevada. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

A number of friends, co-workers, and their spouses brought refreshments and gifts on Saturday afternoon, July 30, to the Maple Valley railroad station to wish Don Vernor well upon his retirement as dispatcher and telegrapher after nearly 33 years at that post.

He had been “on the job” in Maple Valley since January 1945. For three years prior to that he worked as dispatcher and telegrapher in Nevada.

“A train dispatcher’s job,” Vernor explains, “is to keep track at all times of the trains in his area. We always have telephone contact station to station.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Over the near century from 1885 to 1982, Maple Valley hosted three different railroad stations, all located in old Maple Valley just north of where Highway 18 overpasses SR-169. This photo of the third Maple Valley depot dates to 1953 shortly after it was built.

The Maple Valley station was an important cog for directing rail traffic as trains could be switched to Black Diamond, Taylor, or up the Cedar River through Landsburg into the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 16, 2016

By Bill Kombol

This photo of the Maple Valley railway depot was taken in 1948 as viewed looking northbound along the Maple Valley highway (aka SR-169). The depot was also used as the dispatcher’s office.

It was the second railroad station in Maple Valley, replacing the first constructed in 1885, when the original rail line was built to access coal from the newly developed town of Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 9, 2016

By Bill Kombol

No piece of railroad equipment has inspired more slang terms than the caboose. It is the cage, hack, crummy, parlor, or hut – it is the zoo, the coop or the brain wagon.

No piece of railroad equipment has inspired more slang terms than the caboose. It is the cage, hack, crummy, parlor, or hut – it is the zoo, the coop, or the brain wagon.

According to the 1948 Rotogravure magazine article about the Pacific Coast Railroad (PCRR), “Railroading has produced as distinctive a lexicon as it is possible for forthright and uninhibited men to dream up.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 2, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Our glimpse into the world of Pacific Coast Railroad (PCRR) continues with a photo of Conductor J.F. Bow, shown here in his office inside the caboose. The conductor was the crew member on a train responsible for operational and safety duties which did not involve actual moving of the train.

Conductors typically helped trains run on time, completed en-route paperwork, collected tickets from passengers, and coupled and uncoupled cars when drop-offs or hook-ups were made. When trains needed to move in reverse, the conductor controlled backing movement while from his perch in the caboose, traditionally the last car on a train. (more…)

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