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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Railroad’

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, February 1980

C&PS Engine 18 photographed in Black Diamond before 1916. Type: 4-4-0; Builder, Alco-Brooks; Const. No. 48295; Date built, July 1910; Drivers 62; Cyls 18x24; Total Wt. 110,000.

C&PS Engine 18 photographed in Black Diamond before 1916. Type: 4-4-0; Builder, Alco-Brooks; Const. No. 48295; Date built, July 1910; Drivers 62; Cyls 18×24; Total Wt. 110,000.

The Black Diamond Company wanted a railroad completed as quickly as possible because the Mt. Diablo coal field was declining fast. Surveying began under the Oregon Improvement Company in April 1882 for a Columbia and Puget Sound Cedar River extension. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, October 27, 1921

Burglars, believed to be operating with an automobile or light truck, broke into Gibbon’s store late Friday night or early Saturday morning and stole about $500 worth of merchandise of all description.

Tobacco, in the amount of $300, was the major portion of their loot. Other articles stolen include two sacks of sugar, all the hams and bacon, six pairs of shoes, socks, shirts, inner tubes, etc. Entrance was effected through a warehouse window. Deputy sheriffs are investigating. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, October 19, 1952

Seattle Sunday Times, October 19, 1952The view of Maple Valley in autumn depicted on Page 1 of this Magazine Section appealed to Parker McAllister, Times staff artist, as most appropriate for inclusion in his series of rural scenes in the Puget Sound country. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1919

Hall at Newcastle’s Uniontown—Morganville’s sister “city”—which was constructed during the coal miners’ lockout in 1922. The road fronting the building is May Creek Park Dr, the road described in this article, near its junction with the Renton-Newcastle Rd—now known as Coal Creek Parkway.

Hall at Newcastle’s Uniontown—Morganville’s sister “city”—which was constructed during the coal miners’ lockout in 1922. The road in the foreground is May Creek Park Dr, the road described in this article, near its junction with the Renton-Newcastle Rd—now known as Coal Creek Parkway.

After a fight with the Board of County Commissioners that has lasted twelve years, the residents of Bartram Junction, three miles northeast of Renton on the Newcastle branch of the Pacific Coast Railroad, are to have a road outlet to the highways of the county.

The county board yesterday received from the State Public Service Commission permission to construct a temporary grade crossing over the railroad and Commissioner Thomas Dobson of the North District said today that one-half of the one-mile road from the Newcastle highway to Bartram will he constructed this year and that it will be finished next spring at an approximate cost of $2,500. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 19, 1919

Take first place when total average counted—will go to Pittsburgh

A safety mine car invented by Joe Klansnic, circa 1920.

A safety mine car invented by Joe Klansnic, circa 1920.

A team from the Roslyn Fuel Company’s mine at Jonesville won the mine rescue and first aid contest at Black Diamond yesterday and will be sent to Pittsburgh to compete in the national mining competitions September 30 and October 1. The Roslyn team was not a good finished [sic] in the mine rescue work, but was so nearly perfect in first aid work that it overcame the early handicap and finished in front on general average. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 10, 1977

Retired train dispatcher Don Vernor of Maple Valley was honored by friends and co-workers at a recent reception. He has been “on the job” here since 1945 and prior to that worked as a dispatcher and telegrapher in Nevada. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

Retired train dispatcher Don Vernor of Maple Valley was honored by friends and co-workers at a recent reception. He has been “on the job” here since 1945 and prior to that worked as a dispatcher and telegrapher in Nevada. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

A number of friends, co-workers, and their spouses brought refreshments and gifts on Saturday afternoon, July 30, to the Maple Valley railroad station to wish Don Vernor well upon his retirement as dispatcher and telegrapher after nearly 33 years at that post.

He had been “on the job” in Maple Valley since January 1945. For three years prior to that he worked as dispatcher and telegrapher in Nevada.

“A train dispatcher’s job,” Vernor explains, “is to keep track at all times of the trains in his area. We always have telephone contact station to station.” (more…)

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