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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Railroad’

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, May 1997

By Colin McDonald

In January and February of 1938, Bill Iverson and I were hired by the Baldridge Logging Co. to fire their donkey which was located near the top of Taylor Mountain.

I told this to a person who didn’t know anything about logging. I said, “We had to get up early to steam up the donkey before the crew arrived.” He replied, “What did you do? Run him around in a corral?” He thought we were using a four-legged donkey. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 23, 1925

Years ago, the railroad depot was the most popular place in every small city or town, and the daily arrival of the limited was an event seldom missed by the population. Automobiles and motor stages have changed all this, however, and today the highway is more popular than the railway. Nevertheless, the Pacific Coast depot at Black Diamond is still an important place in the camp, and the daily dispatching of long train loads of coal is a sight most pleasing to everyone. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, April 12, 1923

Local banks and Renton agency co-operating in new Ford plan

A new plan for purchasing Ford cars whereby prospective purchasers may avail themselves of banking facilities and start an account with which to buy a car is announced today by the Ford Motor Company and by banks with whom Ford dealers do business. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 19, 1925

Here is shown a shipment of asphalt on the pier ready for loading into Pacific Coast box cars for shipment to the Briquet Plant. Asphalt is used in the manufacture of Diamond Briquets to bind the finely pulverized South Prairie and Black Diamond coal together. It is shipped from California by water in barrels.

When ready for melting at the Briquet Plant the barrels are broken up and the staves burned, as there is no method by which the hardened asphalt can be removed without destroying the container. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2009

Editor’s note: Years ago, while sitting in Bill and Mildred Harshfield’s home on Dorre Don, sipping coffee, munching on her homemade cookies and discussing baseball, I often admired the photo on the kitchen wall of the Section House that used to be in the middle of “old” Maple Valley. It was the Harshfield’s home for 33 years before it was torn down and they moved next to the railroad tracks on the Cedar River. I mentioned the desire to have a copy of that photo to their son, Frank Harshfield, at the picnic in August and soon there appeared three copies in my mailbox. Two will be recorded at the Third Floor Museum. Thank you, Frank.

Editor’s note: Years ago, while sitting in Bill and Mildred Harshfield’s home on Dorre Don, sipping coffee, munching on her homemade cookies and discussing baseball, I often admired the photo on the kitchen wall of the Section House that used to be in the middle of “old” Maple Valley. It was the Harshfield’s home for 33 years before it was torn down and they moved next to the railroad tracks on the Cedar River. I mentioned the desire to have a copy of that photo to their son, Frank Harshfield, at the picnic in August and soon there appeared three copies in my mailbox. Two will be recorded at the Third Floor Museum. Thank you, Frank.

In the booklet, “Maple Valley Family Recollections III,” 1987, Bill Harshfield recalls “Railroading Days in Maple Valley.” Excerpts from that essay describe the section house. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 17, 1924

One feature of the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers on Seattle Harbor, not found in many other ports, is the fact that deep sea vessels may get prompt repairs, when necessary, while bunker coal is being loaded. Immediately adjacent to the bunkers are the large shops of the Pacific Coast Engineering Company, a subsidiary of The Pacific Coast Company, whose trained men and modern equipment are capable of handling any marine repair work except dry docking.

This work is frequently performed while the ship is loading coal, and the vessel can remain in the same slip until the job is completed without interfering with other operations. The picture shows the Westward Ho, an 8,800-ton U.S. Shipping Board carrier, taking on bunkers while undergoing extensive alterations at the same time by the Pacific Coast Engineering Company. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 26, 1924

Diamond Briquets were recently given wide and favorable publicity in Juneau, Alaska, when Harold Lloyd appeared in the film feature, Why Worry, at one of the Juneau theatres. H.G. Walmsley, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s depot at the Alaskan capital, arranged with the exhibitors of this picture to place fifteen of these 16-foot signs about the city.

Dealers handling Diamond Briquets, from Skagway, Alaska, in the north, to Hornbrook, California, in the south, all report no worries with this popular fuel. (more…)

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