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Posts Tagged ‘Pacific Coast Railway’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 27, 1925

These handsome gentlemen run the stores. From left to right, upper row, they are C.T. Paulson of Carbonado, H.W. Doust of Newcastle, Malcolm McPhee, purchasing agent; lower row, L.W. Foreman of Burnett, H.M. McDowell of Black Diamond, and E.F. De Grandpre, Manager of Miscellaneous Operations. This picture shows them working hard at a business meeting.

Mr. McPhee buys the goods, the store managers sell them, and Mr. De Grandpre gets all the money. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 30, 1925

No feature of the First Aid and Mine Rescue Meet held last Saturday at Black Diamond attracted more attention than the exhibition in first aid and resuscitation work put on by the midget teams from Newcastle and Black Diamond. So far as is known, these two teams are the youngest First Aid teams in the world.

Fathers of the boys are miners employed by the Pacific Coast Coal Company, and the interest displayed by the youngsters is indicative of the efforts put forth by everyone to make mining safe. Members of the Newcastle team, in the front row, include Ernie Bahr, Howard Cotterill, Donald Gilbert, Clyde Joughlin, John Young, and Wm. Schuirman.

The Black Diamond boys, in the back row, are Elmon Rouse, John Gallagher, Harold Lloyd, Jr., Benny Hughes, Oliver Rouse, Jimmy Nicholson, and Ellis Ash. Harold Lloyd, Sr., trained the Black Diamond team and Wm. Jones was the instructor for the Newcastle lads. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 5, 1919

Issaquah coal mine, one of the Pacific Coast Company’s many properties

Issaquah coal mine, one of the Pacific Coast Company’s many properties

Employing a whole army of 2,500 persons—operating four different companies—and maintaining a payroll of approximately $4,000,000 a year—the Pacific Coast Company is one of the great corporations contributing to the prosperity and growth of Seattle and the Pacific Northwest. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 8, 1924

Not a feminine foot faltered when the guides for this group of King County P.T.A. members led the way into the dark recesses of the Primrose Tunnel at Newcastle. These women, a portion of 300 who recently visited Newcastle Mine as the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, here saw firsthand the actual processes of coal mining.

The guides for this group were, Dan Carey, Jas. E. Ash, and Phillip Chase, all of the Engineering Department. John Eck, fireboss in charge of the operations at Primrose, is kneeling at the left. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 31, 1924

At the ocean terminal of The Pacific Coast Company’s railroad in California there are two large shipping wharves about two miles distant from each other. One agent, J.S. Sullivan, handles both wharves and he has worked out the ingenious machine shown above for running back and forth between them.

As can be seen, it is a five-passenger Ford car equipped with railroad wheels. The steering wheel, apparently, is intended for emergency calls when Mr. Sullivan is in too great a hurry to go around by way of the railroad track and finds it necessary to short-cut across the water. (more…)

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