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Posts Tagged ‘Pacosco’

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 3, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

About a mile and a quarter southeasterly from Franklin and about the same distance due east from the entrance to the Pacosco Mine, is the Hyde Mine.

The Hyde Mine was originally developed by sinking a slope on Number Twelve Seam, then later a rock tunnel was driven connecting this slope with the well-known McKay Seam. This mine was opened prior to 1909, but was not extensively developed until the McKay Coal Seam was found, which was a year or two later.

Gangways were driven to the north and to the northwest, toward what is now Pacosco Mine, and gangways were also driven to the south along the strikes of both the McKay and the Number Twelve. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 29, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

Pacosco, as it is now called, was formerly Franklin. This district was first opened on the banks of Green River on the McKay Coal Seam about 1885. The railroad was extended from Black Diamond in order to develop this coal area.

Originally, Franklin Mine was opened by a drift driven on the McKay Coal at bunker level above the old railroad grade. Later a water level gangway was driven from the edge of Green River and the coal hoisted up an incline on the surface and dumped over the same tipple as that from the upper level. Later a slope was sunk on another bed which underlies the McKay and all of the coal below the original bunker level was hauled through this opening.

Numerous slopes were sunk at Franklin and also one shaft was developed. Most of the coal was mined from the McKay Bed but some was also mined from two underlying beds, the Number Twelve and the Number Ten. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 22, 1923

delivering-briquets-in-snow-2-22-1923If all obstacles to the future sale and delivery of coal are overcome in the same thorough and efficient manner in which the Sales Department, under Sales Manager Wylie Hemphill and his able corps of assistants, conquered the fury of the elements and filled every order for coal during the blizzard of last week, there need be little concern about the ability of the sales force to keep the mines working.

In the picture shown above you see one of the ingenuous methods employed to furnish fuel, when many coal concerns were tied up entirely, making no effort to undertake deliveries of orders. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 8, 1922

Glenn Rockey, Ruth Mills, and Walter Bremnon, with the old Masonic Hall in the background (BDHS #2003.46).

Glenn Rockey, Ruth Mills, and Walter Bremnon, with the old Masonic Hall in the background (BDHS #2003.46).

Another smoker was staged Friday evening as per schedule and afforded amusement and entertainment for a goodly crowd.

The preliminary bout between Pete Gallagher and Glenn Rockey was a hummer. Rockey was the heavier of the two and gave Pete quite a tussle but Pete evened matters by pasting Mr. Rockey on the intake valve.

In the second bout, Kid Banchero, alias Catfish, swam around Clarence Rockey until he had Rockey so dizzy he could not locate the Kid’s periscope. While his opponent was in this condition the Catfish poked his right fin into Rockey’s port binnacle.

Rockey floundered among the barnacles for a spell but soon recovered and evened matters by handing the Catfish a stiff one in the bait-grabber. Thanks, boys, a nice little exhibition.

A real scientific interpretation of the manly art, was presented in the spirited bout staged by “Blackie” Beaupied and Jackie Neil. These two boys furnished the fans with three fast rounds of good clever boxing. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 11, 1922

By Harry J. Scott

New Pacific Coast Coal Co logo - 1927The infant 1922 was given an auspicious sendoff in this man’s town. Everything necessary to an enjoyable and successful “Hi Jinks” dance was in evidence when the Clubroom was opened to the guests on Saturday evening.

Bernhard’s orchestra, the same aggregation of artists who furnished the music at our previous dance, was on hand attired in appropriate Hi Jinks costumes, and again delivered the same brand of high grade music for which they are noted. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 28, 1921

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

The purpose of this preliminary sketch is to give the readers of the Bulletin a general view of the coal fields of the state, this to be followed by more detailed articles covering each of the counties in which coal occurs in commercial quantities.

Near the northern boundary line of the state, on the northwest slope of Mt. Baker, there is a small area containing anthracite and anthracitic coal. So far no commercial mines have been developed within this field.

Westward and near the shore of Bellingham Bay, is an area containing a coal bed that is being developed by the Bellingham Mines Company. It is not known at present what the full extent of this area is, but it is probable that additional discoveries will be made in Whatcom County. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 29, 1922

Pacific Coast Coal Co. Logo 1922To our employees:
Some of the company’s officials have, from time to time, been asked what effect the April 1st strike of the United Mine Workers of America will have on our operations.

We have assumed that the adoption of the joint representation plan is, in itself, an answer to such questions, but in order to remove any doubts in the minds of any of our employees, the company desires to state that the strike referred to will have no effect whatever on our operations. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS Bulletin, Winter 2016

By William Kombol

PCC228

Loaded train in Franklin, 1902

The town of Franklin was developed for coal mining and operated as a company town from around 1885 to 1922. At its peak there were approximately 1,100 people living and working in Franklin. The town’s beginning and purpose were linked to 50-million-year-old coal seams exposed along the deep gorge cut through bedrock.

Explorers discovered the coal while traveling through the Green River Gorge in the early 1880s leading to the founding of nearby Black Diamond. The Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad was extended from Renton to Franklin in 1885 allowing coal production to commence and the town to develop. The town was named for the famed American patriot, Benjamin Franklin. (more…)

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