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Posts Tagged ‘parade’

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, September 4, 1987

By Debra Nelson

Les Van Hoof is one of the new breed of coal miners who operate the levers of heavy equipment rather than picks and shovels. (Staff photo by Gary Kissel.)

Les Van Hoof is one of the new breed of coal miners who operate the levers of heavy equipment rather than picks and shovels. (Staff photo by Gary Kissel.)

Coal mining… the words evoke images of dark mine shafts, dynamite, and hardy men, exhausted from the hazards of blasting the mineral from deep within the earth, ravaged by black lung disease.

The old folk song “Sixteen Tons” tells that story—of men who rarely saw the sun and whose blood and sweat made coal the major industry in the Black Diamond region until the 1920s.

But those were the “good old days” of coal mining and, fortunately, the industry has undergone radical changes. For one thing, today’s miners work above ground, in the hot summer sun and the cold winter rain.

This Labor Day weekend, Black Diamond looks back at the old days, remembering those pioneers and miners who settled the town. The festivities include the kind of fun and games many pioneer kids enjoyed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 16, 1987

By Eulalia Tollefson

Bill Petchnick, Jr. was honored by his Black Diamond friends and neighbors, who chose him Black Diamond’s Person of the Year.

Bill Petchnick, Jr. was honored by his Black Diamond friends and neighbors, who chose him Black Diamond’s Person of the Year.

Clowns, cute kiddies, and a carnival atmosphere—all ingredients for a great community celebration—greeted crowds who arrived for one of the best ever Black Diamond Labor Day festivals.

Enjoyment was enhanced by games, good food, and a “hi, neighbor” element, along with balmy, sunny weather.

Highlights of the celebration were the 56-entry parade directed by Charlene Birklid and the presentation of Labor Day dignitaries, with Diane Olson serving as emcee. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 11, 2007

By Kathleen Kear

Labor Day Program 2007

To read the article, “Back at the Stump: A Labor Day Reflection,” about the formation of the Black Diamond coal miners’ union in 1907, click here.

The fun began on Saturday, Sept. 1st, and ran all the way through Labor Day, Sept. 3rd, with each day filled with all sorts of activities the whole family could enjoy.

There was the annual softball game with the fire/police team trying hard to beat the community only to have the community come back and take the win.

There was also the nostalgic sock hop at the newly dedicated Black Diamond gym, Black Diamond Museum tours full of fascinating historical items and information, the dedicating of the city’s first skate park, pancake breakfast, peanut wagon and ice cream, BBQ luncheon, button raffle drawing, watermelon and pie-eating contests, and field games to boot.

The parade was filled with bunches of kids as well as adults on bikes, floats, with their pets, in cars, on tractors, and big rigs. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, July 5, 1963

From left—Laura Sherrard, Gracie Hansen, and Marcia Deveraux

From left—Laura Sherrard, Gracie Hansen, and Marcia Deveraux

Although the World Fair’s Paradise International Club will become a place of fun in Ravensdale, it will not quite recapture its old atmosphere, Gracie Hansen said yesterday.

Mrs. Hansen flew to Ravensdale from an engagement in Ocean Shores to dedicate her old showplace—moved to Ravensdale from the fairgrounds—as a County Park Department “activity center.”

“But you’ll never be able to replace the sex and cotton candy,” Gracie complained. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, July 8, 1888

US Flag FlyingThe celebration of the Fourth of July at Black Diamond was by far the most interesting in the history of that enterprising town, and it is doubtful whether any town of the size of Black Diamond has had a more imposing and successful celebration of the anniversary of the nation’s birth.

The exercises of the day opened with a procession headed by the Black Diamond band. All of the states and territories were represented by little girls appropriately dressed, and a magnificent liberty car was noticed in the processing.

After the parade an old-time Fourth of July meeting was held, Mr. W.P. Morgans acting as chairman. The oration was delivered by L.C. Gilman, of Seattle, and Mr. T.G. Spaight read the Declaration of Independence.

In the afternoon a foot race of one mile took place between P. Kennedy, of Black Diamond, and W. Steele, of Franklin, the former being an easy winner.

In the evening there was a magnificent display of fireworks under the direction of a committee consisting of David B. Davis, Alex. Turnbull, W.P. Morgans, J.R. Williams, and P. Vesney.

It is unnecessary to say that the celebration was thoroughly enjoyed by the patriotic people of the flourishing mining town.

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 18, 1977

Planning has begun to offer Black Diamond, and especially its children and young people, a traditional Labor Days celebration. At a well-attended first meeting last week, eighteen interested persons began to draw the plans that will make the celebration possible.

Sid Bergestrom and Steve (Home Smith) Gustin are acting as temporary co-chairmen. Sue Capponi will be in charge of the Finance Committee which involves soliciting donations for prizes, etc. Chuck Capponi will handle the Soap Box Derby, and George and Dianne Wilson will do the promotions. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 3, 1975

By D’Ann Pedee

Labor Day 1975The sun winked only now and then on Black Diamond’s Labor Day but the generally shabby weather was no match for the spirits of the silver anniversary participants.

Sunday’s soap box derby had 15 entries, spills, and excitement.

In the 8-10 year old division, Brad Koenen was checked by radar going down Lawson Hill—at a speedy 28 miles per hour with his brakes on—to take the first place trophy and a $50 prize. (more…)

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