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Posts Tagged ‘PCCC General Store’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 18, 1923

When those who had gathered at Burnett last Thursday, to attend the monthly meeting of the Store Department, checked up after all were seated around the dinner table it was discovered that all records had been broken in the number attending, a count showing 52 present. After an excellent dinner, prepared and served by Chef Emil Bernhard and his assistants, an instructive and enjoyable program of talks was attentively listened to.

J.C. Hinckley of the West Coast Grocery Co., Tacoma, led off with a very able talk of an inspirational nature. He was followed by L.W. Foreman, the new manager of Burnett store, who briefly outlined his program for the development of trade. R.A. Krebs, manager of Newcastle store, then read a paper dealing with salesmanship, which was followed by a talk on “Some Knotty Problems” by H.M. McDowell, manager of Black Diamond store. McDowell’s talk provoked an extended discussion of various problems met with daily in the company stores. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 4, 1923

Indication of the wide-spreading use of Diamond Briquets is seen in the growing demand for this fuel for consumption in the smudge pots of Yakima Valley orchards. Each spring, during the budding and blossoming season, Yakima orchardists strive to save their crops from the ravages of late frosts by the use of smudge pots placed beneath the flower-laden trees. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 27, 1923

This group shows some of the supervisors at Black Diamond Mine upon whose shoulders falls much of the responsibility for getting out the coal. From left to right, standing, Fireboss Henry Becker, Supt. J.J. Jones, Fireboss Gomer Evans, Lampman Elmer Hyneman, and Fireboss Richard Barry. Kneeling in front are Mine Foreman Dave Hughes and Mine Foreman Theo. Rouse. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Northwest Post Card Club newsletter; July, August, September 2017

By Ken Jensen

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

For the miners and their families in turn-of-the-century Black Diamond—an isolated company town near the Cascade foothills of South King County, Washington—the 33-mile trip to Seattle was an all-day journey. The company’s railroad and circa 1885 depot, along with its general store, were the townspeople’s only real connection to the outside world.

In 1904 the Pacific Coast Co. owned all of Black Diamond—its mines, its land, its stores, pretty much everything—as well as neighboring Franklin and a handful of other King and Pierce county towns. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 24, 1920

Watchmen on alert, opens fire on gang

Sends two shots after fugitives—they turn and reply with three, but make escape in darkness

Three cracksmen about 12 o’clock last night blew the outer door of the safe in the general store kept by the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Black Diamond, engaged in a revolver battle with George Upton, aged watchman, who drove them away, and escaped without obtaining any loot. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 14, 1923

If working a shift in Black Diamond Mine was no harder for the four men shown above than it was for them to pose for this picture, there would always be a mad scramble among the men to see who could get the first man-trip down.

At the left we introduce to you, George Belt, and next to him, Fred Cunningham, a former Issaquah miner. The man next in line is R.E. “Curly” Campbell and the young Hercules at the extreme right is Darwin Walton. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 24, 1923

Every mine has its firebosses, but Newcastle is willing to stack its supervisory force against that of any other mine in the world, confident of winning first honors anywhere. To back up their boasts they present herewith the photograph of a group taken recently, most of whom had just come off shift. From left to right they are:

A. Elmer Anderson, Dick Richards, Mine Foreman Chas. Lumley, John Eck, Joe Daler, Wm. Bowie, and W.E. Jones. (more…)

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