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Posts Tagged ‘Pierce County’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 3, 1925

This is Supt. Simon Ash’s fiery steed, Flyer. It and its fellows hauled the coal trips in the mines of Western Washington before electric haulage came in.

Engineer-fireman Norman Stevenson and conductor-brakeman-flagman-switchman Tom Dodd do, or would, take turns lifting her back on the track when, as, and if she hopped off, they’re that strong and determined.

The Flyer was cold for years until she was fired up recently for yard duty to take the place of a storage-battery locomotive that went inside on development work. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 4, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

More than million briquets made daily

In 1914 the Briquet Plant was opened and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that more than one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 28, 1925

Black Diamond justly feels proud of its splendid baseball park and athletic field, with its commodious grandstand and band pavilion. Both the infield and the outfield are grass sod, making it a very fast diamond. Within the park enclosure is a large grove of trees providing facilities for picnic parties, and back of the grandstand tennis courts are being constructed.

All of the work in the park was performed by volunteers, making it in the fullest sense a community enterprise. This picture was taken on the day of the opening game, when Black Diamond and the Seattle Briquets played 16 innings before the contest ended with a score of 2 to 1 in favor of the Seattle nine. (more…)

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Originally published in the Orting Oracle, May 26, 1916

Friday, May 26, 1916—Superior Judge Easterday last Tuesday sentenced Mayor Joseph McCaskey of Wilkeson $100 and costs of the trial and ten days in the county jail, he having been convicted of selling intoxicating liquors at his drug store in Wilkeson.

The total costs of the prosecution was $386.75, and the law provides that druggist convicted of violating the statutes cannot sell intoxicating liquors for any purpose for a period of two years unless they post a heavy bond to observe the law in making sales.

The $486.75 McCaskey was ordered to pay may be a small matter when compared with what he may have to yield up to the county. It is admitted that there is a strong grounds for the suspicion that A.A. Battiste, McCaskey’s pharmacist, who is out of jail on heavy bail for his alleged part in the selling of booze, has skipped the country. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 17, 2011

By Barbara Nilson

Front of the Carbonado Saloon built in 1889 and now offering a special Senior Menu on Thursdays.

Every Thursday is Senior Citizen Day at the Carbonado Tavern built in 1889.

The saloon is an inviting place with a favorite niche to the right of the door with a gas stove, round table carved with years of names of thirsty patrons, and the walls covered with reminders of when Carbonado was a mining and logging community starting in 1870. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 14, 1925

Under the baton of Bandmaster Henry Carroll, the Black Diamond and Newcastle bands of the Pacific Coast Coal Company journeyed to Bellingham last week, where they participated in the celebration of the Sixth Annual Tulip Festival.

The two bands combined, made a musical organization of thirty-six pieces, and attired in miners’ caps they presented a fine and distinctive appearance. In the upper portion of the halftone they are shown lined up just before the big parade, while below the Bulletin photographer caught them in action. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 30, 1925

Josephine Corliss Preston

Josephine Corliss Preston

Following a three-day convention of the County School Superintendents of the state at Olympia, at which were present a number of prominent national and state educational leaders, the delegates have been invited to visit Carbonado Mine as the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Mrs. Josephine Corliss Preston, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, and Mrs. Clare Ketchum Tripp, Director of the Washington Industries Educational Bureau, have arranged for those attending the convention to visit a number of industrial plants in Tacoma on Thursday morning, April 30.

Immediately following lunch, the party will be conducted by auto to Carbonado, via South Prairie and Wilkeson. Details of the program will be found on the last page of the Bulletin. (more…)

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