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Posts Tagged ‘Pierce County’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 17, 2011

By Barbara Nilson

Front of the Carbonado Saloon built in 1889 and now offering a special Senior Menu on Thursdays.

Every Thursday is Senior Citizen Day at the Carbonado Tavern built in 1889.

The saloon is an inviting place with a favorite niche to the right of the door with a gas stove, round table carved with years of names of thirsty patrons, and the walls covered with reminders of when Carbonado was a mining and logging community starting in 1870. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 14, 1925

Under the baton of Bandmaster Henry Carroll, the Black Diamond and Newcastle bands of the Pacific Coast Coal Company journeyed to Bellingham last week, where they participated in the celebration of the Sixth Annual Tulip Festival.

The two bands combined, made a musical organization of thirty-six pieces, and attired in miners’ caps they presented a fine and distinctive appearance. In the upper portion of the halftone they are shown lined up just before the big parade, while below the Bulletin photographer caught them in action. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 30, 1925

Josephine Corliss Preston

Josephine Corliss Preston

Following a three-day convention of the County School Superintendents of the state at Olympia, at which were present a number of prominent national and state educational leaders, the delegates have been invited to visit Carbonado Mine as the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Mrs. Josephine Corliss Preston, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, and Mrs. Clare Ketchum Tripp, Director of the Washington Industries Educational Bureau, have arranged for those attending the convention to visit a number of industrial plants in Tacoma on Thursday morning, April 30.

Immediately following lunch, the party will be conducted by auto to Carbonado, via South Prairie and Wilkeson. Details of the program will be found on the last page of the Bulletin. (more…)

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Originally published in The News Tribune, April 23, 1995

By Lisa Kremer
The News Tribune

For 47 years, Black Diamond’s Labor Day celebration has displayed the essence of a close-knit small town.

There were three-legged races. A greased-pole climb. A shoe-kicking contest. And a parade everyone in the community could join—and did.

But this year, organizers are afraid there might be no three-day Labor Day celebration. Only three people came to the last organizational meeting, said Lorianne Taff, who was there.

Taff moved to Black Diamond less than two years ago.

“I fell in love with the town and the charm of the town, and I want to see it preserved,” Taff said. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 23, 1925

Years ago, the railroad depot was the most popular place in every small city or town, and the daily arrival of the limited was an event seldom missed by the population. Automobiles and motor stages have changed all this, however, and today the highway is more popular than the railway. Nevertheless, the Pacific Coast depot at Black Diamond is still an important place in the camp, and the daily dispatching of long train loads of coal is a sight most pleasing to everyone. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 19, 1925

Here is shown a shipment of asphalt on the pier ready for loading into Pacific Coast box cars for shipment to the Briquet Plant. Asphalt is used in the manufacture of Diamond Briquets to bind the finely pulverized South Prairie and Black Diamond coal together. It is shipped from California by water in barrels.

When ready for melting at the Briquet Plant the barrels are broken up and the staves burned, as there is no method by which the hardened asphalt can be removed without destroying the container. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 17, 1929

George Watkin Evans is asked to solve problems of anthracite diggings for Pennsylvania firm

George Watkin Evans, Seattle mining engineer, chosen to make survey of Pennsylvania anthracite fields.

George Watkin Evans, Seattle mining engineer, chosen to make survey of Pennsylvania anthracite fields.

Industrial wise men of the East have reached into Seattle to capitalize the wealth of experience acquired by a grimy Welsh lad since he began at the age of 11 oiling coal cars in mines at Franklin.

The lad, now the eminent George Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, who can boast a number of college degrees and recognized mining achievements, has been selected to make a detailed study of the underground operations of the numerous anthracite mines of Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company, the largest anthracite coal company in the world.

Is recognition of Northwest

He was selected by A.J. Maloney, new president of the reorganized company, to devise better ways of mining. The face that a Seattle man was chosen when ordinarily the anthracite fields of Pennsylvania have supplied such talent is regarded by coal mining experts as recognition of the Pacific Northwest and tribute to Mr. Evans. (more…)

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