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Posts Tagged ‘Pipe Lake’

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, May 2000

By Barbara Nilson

Photos by Sherrie Acker

The “action” in the 1920s to 1950s, from Seattle south, was at the lake resorts in the Valley. Memories of those glory days were shared at the March program with Dolores Gaffney and Janet Bertagni talking about Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness resort, and Gloria Foss remembering the family’s resort on Shadow Lake.

Lake Wilderness resorts

Attending the historical society program on resorts were, from left, Janet Bertagni, Dolores Gaffney Judge, and Bernadine Gaffney Gebenini.

Dolores Gaffney, daughter of Tom Gaffney, reported her father and his brother Kain purchased the property on Lake Wilderness in 1926 from Abraham and Sam Cohen. The family moved to the lake and the resort opened in the spring of 1927 as Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness.

At that time there were three small family resorts on the lake. Dieckman with his two sons, Jeff and Don, had just started one, and across the lake was McKinney’s. McKinney’s also had a dance hall that was two stories high that they eventually turned into a skating rink. In April 1939 McKinneys sold their place to Gaffneys.

One of the older buildings was used for a dance hall, said Dolores, and they used kerosene lamps. In 1936 they built a new dance hall after the old one burned down. They had a 30-foot-high diving board as well as cabins, tennis courts, picnic areas, ball fields, and playgrounds.

In 1949 Diekmans and Gaffneys were combined and the Gaffneys decided to build a lodge. The design was developed by Young, Richardson and Carlson and won the grand prize from the Washington Chapter of Architects in 1951 and the top award from the American Institute in New York in 1952. The center column totem pole was carved by the famous Doug McCarter. It is 35 feet tall and weighs ten tons. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 24, 1976

Forty-nine new homes in the Greater Maple Valley area are planned to be built on 48 acres on the southwest side of the Cedar River, downstream from the Landsburg County Park, the Voice has learned.

The project will be called the Cedar Bend Housing Development and a hearing will be held on April 20 at the King County Courthouse. (more…)

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Originally published in the Globe News, October 31, 1973

By our county news bureau

A proposed Black Diamond-Lake Sawyer interceptor would start at the west city limits, extend north past the western shores of Lake Sawyer, turn west of 272 St. SE and extend to Timberlane at the Covington Pump Station where it would join the existing Cascade Sewer System force main extending into Kent. The city of Black Diamond, the Lake Sawyer, Lake Wilderness and Pipe Lake areas would be required to provide local sewerage collection before connecting to the main interceptor.

A proposed Black Diamond-Lake Sawyer interceptor would start at the west city limits, extend north past the western shores of Lake Sawyer, turn west of 272 St. SE and extend to Timberlane at the Covington Pump Station where it would join the existing Cascade Sewer System force main extending into Kent. The City of Black Diamond, the Lake Sawyer, Lake Wilderness and Pipe Lake areas would be required to provide local sewerage collection before connecting to the main interceptor.

A sewerage system planned but dropped three or four years ago is once more underway, county officials announced this week.

The area to be served by the projected $1 million system is east of Auburn at Black Diamond, Lake Morton, and Lake Sawyer, where pollution problems have been increasing due to inadequate septic tank drain fields and growing population pressures. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 19, 1927

Delightful spot, only 28 miles distant, is called a bit of Switzerland at door of Seattle

By Ellis Coe

1—Stretch of pavement through Maple Valley—the Reo Wolverine with Fred Lamping at the wheel. The tall maples towering overhead offer shade and hazards as well for the new Maple Valley Golf and Country Club seen in the background. 2—Rustic wood bridge dividing Lake Lucerne from the upper lake, formerly Pipe Lake. Both lakes are generally known now as Lake Lucerne. The clearing in the foreground is to be landscaped and on it will be built a summer home for W.T. Burwell. 3—Placid Lake Lucerne from the north shore looking toward the picnic groves with the hostess house and the canoe house in view. Fred Lamping and Miss Times Representative are seen contentedly paddling about in the canoe. 4—Entrance to Lucerne fashioned from the giant firs. The pillars present an imposing appearance that impresses one with the rustic beauty that awaits as one continues on through the gateway.

1—Stretch of pavement through Maple Valley—the Reo Wolverine with Fred Lamping at the wheel. The tall maples towering overhead offer shade and hazards as well for the new Maple Valley Golf and Country Club seen in the background. 2—Rustic wood bridge dividing Lake Lucerne from the upper lake, formerly Pipe Lake. Both lakes are generally known now as Lake Lucerne. The clearing in the foreground is to be landscaped and on it will be built a summer home for W.T. Burwell. 3—Placid Lake Lucerne from the north shore looking toward the picnic groves with the hostess house and the canoe house in view. Fred Lamping and Miss Times Representative are seen contentedly paddling about in the canoe. 4—Entrance to Lucerne fashioned from the giant firs. The pillars present an imposing appearance that impresses one with the rustic beauty that awaits as one continues on through the gateway.

Beautiful Lake Lucerne—and after one visits it the adjective seems to become a passion. The more often it is repeated the more beautiful it seems. It is often said of Lucerne that it is a bit of Switzerland almost at the side door of Seattle.

Thousands of motorists of the Northwest clamber for a bit of nature’s rare beauty. They drive miles upon miles to seek it. By following the map on this page, within less than an hour of easy driving, as one goes through the rustic way to Lucerne there will be unfolded one of the real gems of scenic grandeur in the Northwest. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 2, 1950

Advantages of a 9,200-acre site at Lake Sawyer for the proposed Air Force Academy were pointed out today to a three-man Air Force selection board which toured the suggested site.

John Nordmark, King County planning officer, outlined in detail to Gen. Carl Spaatz, former Army Air Corps chief of staff; Lieut. Gen. H.R. Harmon and Brig. Gen. Harold L. Clark of the Air Force, the reasons why Lake Sawyer and the surrounding area would make an ideal site for the academy. (more…)

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