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Posts Tagged ‘Pocahontas’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 21, 1920

Increases of from 19 cents to $1.40 a ton coming, says fuel dealer

Increases ranging from 19 cents to $1.94 in the cost of coal a ton in Seattle will ultimately be one result of the United States Railway Labor Board wage award of $600,000,000 to railway employees, said Harvey S. Jordan, commissioner of the Retail Fuel Dealers’ Association, today. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 4, 1923

By George Watkin Evans

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

There are two principal theories of coal formation, one called the Drift Theory and the other In Situ.

There are advocates of both theories, and personally I believe that each is right within limits. I am of the opinion that some coal beds have been formed in the places where we now find them, whereas in other instances, the vegetable matter which constitutes the coal bed grew in another spot and has been transported by water to the place where we now find the coal.

In the Drift Theory it is assumed that the vegetable matter grew in one spot and a current of water carried the decaying vegetal material and deposited it some distance from the spot on which it grew.

One argument for this theory is that there are many partings of shale and other impurities in some of our coal beds and again some of the coal itself is very heavy in ash. It is reasoned that if the material was not carried by currents and deposited some distance from the place where it grew that the partings of shale and other impurities would not be associated with the coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 22, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

Prior to 1887 there was a great deal of excitement because of the alleged high grade coal beds discovered in the Raging River district, which lies southeasterly from Issaquah at distances varying from three to ten miles.

Raging River is a tributary of the Snoqualmie River and flows in a northerly direction through the center of the northeasterly portion of the King County coal fields.

The district as a whole is made up largely of steep-sided hills and rugged mountains and is a difficult and expensive field in which to prospect. The hills and mountains at the head of and on each side of Raging River contain scores of coal outcrops in many instances far up on the side of the mountains. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 25, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

Pacific Coast Coal Co. Logo 1922The articles written thus far describing the coal fields of the State of Washington have dealt with fields which, with the exception of the Bellingham coal mines in Whatcom County, do not contain coal mines of very great commercial importance.

King County, next in order of discussion, is one of the three important bituminous coal areas of the state, the other two being Pierce and Kittitas counties. King County contains coal areas of such importance that it will be advisable to divide them under subdivisions, as follows:

Newcastle–Issaquah–Grand Ridge area; Cedar River area; Raging River–Upper Cedar River area; Ravensdale–Black Diamond area; Pacosco–Hyde area; Kummer–Krain area; National–Navy area; Bayne–Pocahontas area; Durham–Kangley area.

By subdividing the field into the above groups, the geological structure of the fields and the types of coal contained in them can be handled to best advantage. (more…)

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