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Posts Tagged ‘poetry’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 19, 1925

Shortly before the tunnel work was completed in the New Black Diamond Mine last month, Manager of Mines D.C. Botting arranged for the mine superintendents and supervisors from each of the camps to inspect the property.

In addition to going over the New Black Diamond property the party also visited the Briquet Plant, where the process of manufacturing Diamond Briquets was witnessed first hand. The picture shows the group on the trestle leading from the mine entrance to the tipple and bunkers under construction. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 8, 1925

Playing good, consistent ball throughout the entire season, the Black Diamond baseball team ended up with flying colors, the champions of the Pacific Coast Coal League for 1925. Saturday night, October 10, the team will celebrate the close of the season with a banquet at the hotel.

In the picture, left to right, front row—F.C. Bergmann, secretary of the club; Geo. Spencer, Johnny Buck, Pete Gallagher, mascot; Neil Andreson, Mike Naffer, H.J. Babb, manager; back row Geo. Allen, treasurer; Grover Kertis, captain: L. Pierotti, Joe Daley, E. Moon Mullen, S. Paxton, Lou LaFray, Joe Snorski, and Wm. Nicholson, president. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 3, 1925

This is Supt. Simon Ash’s fiery steed, Flyer. It and its fellows hauled the coal trips in the mines of Western Washington before electric haulage came in.

Engineer-fireman Norman Stevenson and conductor-brakeman-flagman-switchman Tom Dodd do, or would, take turns lifting her back on the track when, as, and if she hopped off, they’re that strong and determined.

The Flyer was cold for years until she was fired up recently for yard duty to take the place of a storage-battery locomotive that went inside on development work. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 20, 1925

Black Diamond was visited last Saturday by Mr. Walter Barnum, president of The Pacific Coast Company, and Mr. E.C. Ward, president of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, together with vice-presidents N.D. Moore, Wylie Hemphill, and a party of staff officials.

In the absence of James Justice, Alternate Mine Council Chairman who was on shift in the mine at the time, A.W. Gray, former chairman, welcomed the officials to the camp, in which he was joined by Supt. Paul Gallagher.

The Bulletin photographer caught Mr. Gray, Pres. Barnum, Supt. Gallagher, and Pres. Ward in the order shown in the halftone above. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 16, 1925

First prize was awarded the Keithly Wood & Coal Company of Everett for the best industrial float in the Fourth of July parade in the Snohomish County metropolis. The Keithly Wood & Coal Company is the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s branch in Everett, and last year also won first prize in the parade. Six dappled grey horses drew the attractive float shown above, while the four young ladies garbed in black and white costumes danced before “Old King Coal” and his diminutive aides. Diamond Briquets and Black Diamond Lump were emphasized in the general design and decorations. C.O. Hilen is the manager of the company’s Everett agency. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 4, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

More than million briquets made daily

In 1914 the Briquet Plant was opened and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that more than one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 28, 1925

Black Diamond justly feels proud of its splendid baseball park and athletic field, with its commodious grandstand and band pavilion. Both the infield and the outfield are grass sod, making it a very fast diamond. Within the park enclosure is a large grove of trees providing facilities for picnic parties, and back of the grandstand tennis courts are being constructed.

All of the work in the park was performed by volunteers, making it in the fullest sense a community enterprise. This picture was taken on the day of the opening game, when Black Diamond and the Seattle Briquets played 16 innings before the contest ended with a score of 2 to 1 in favor of the Seattle nine. (more…)

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