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Posts Tagged ‘Pool Hall’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 27, 1925

These handsome gentlemen run the stores. From left to right, upper row, they are C.T. Paulson of Carbonado, H.W. Doust of Newcastle, Malcolm McPhee, purchasing agent; lower row, L.W. Foreman of Burnett, H.M. McDowell of Black Diamond, and E.F. De Grandpre, Manager of Miscellaneous Operations. This picture shows them working hard at a business meeting.

Mr. McPhee buys the goods, the store managers sell them, and Mr. De Grandpre gets all the money. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 30, 1925

No feature of the First Aid and Mine Rescue Meet held last Saturday at Black Diamond attracted more attention than the exhibition in first aid and resuscitation work put on by the midget teams from Newcastle and Black Diamond. So far as is known, these two teams are the youngest First Aid teams in the world.

Fathers of the boys are miners employed by the Pacific Coast Coal Company, and the interest displayed by the youngsters is indicative of the efforts put forth by everyone to make mining safe. Members of the Newcastle team, in the front row, include Ernie Bahr, Howard Cotterill, Donald Gilbert, Clyde Joughlin, John Young, and Wm. Schuirman.

The Black Diamond boys, in the back row, are Elmon Rouse, John Gallagher, Harold Lloyd, Jr., Benny Hughes, Oliver Rouse, Jimmy Nicholson, and Ellis Ash. Harold Lloyd, Sr., trained the Black Diamond team and Wm. Jones was the instructor for the Newcastle lads. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 25, 1925

Practically the entire populations of Newcastle, Burnett, Carbonado, Black Diamond, and Wilkeson joined in celebrating the first annual picnic given by the employees of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and allied companies at Fortuna Park last Sunday.

Music was plentifully dispensed throughout the day by the combined Newcastle and Black Diamond bands, numbering 40 pieces in all. Wilkeson, as special guests from the Wilkeson Coal Coke Co., came in more than 50 automobiles, each decorated with a distinctive sign. The ambulance was utilized as a supply wagon. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 27, 1923

Herewith the Bulletin publishes the first picture made public of the new Primrose tunnel at Newcastle, which only recently was completed to a distance of 650 feet where the new coal seam was reached.

Three shifts of gangway and counter driving will now be kept continuously on the development, and according to estimates, the new opening will be producing coal in commercial quantities by the early part of next fall.

In the foreground of the picture can be seen John G. Schoning of the United States Bureau of Mines; E.L. Fortney, fireboss; Paul Gallagher, former superintendent at Newcastle; and D.C. Botting, manager of mines. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 17, 1922

Billiards on the right, the Black Diamond Garage on the left. Photo courtesy Washington State Historical Society, Asahel Curtis photographer, 1925.

Billiards on the right, the Black Diamond Garage on the left. Photo courtesy Washington State Historical Society, Asahel Curtis photographer, 1925.

Who do you think has become Jimmy Chambers’ partner in the pool room? No other than Grover E. Kertis, popular first baseman on the ball team.

Grover has been in camp about 6 months, and few men in it are more popular. Entering the employ of the company, originally as a guard, he soon went to work for Jimmy, the two having been friends for about fourteen years. They met for the first time at Port Townsend, at which time Grover was mascot of the ball team of which Jimmy was a member. (This will give you an idea of Jimmy’s age.)

Grover worked at Jimmy’s place at Black Diamond for a salary, but as the business grew it soon appeared it required more than one owner to handle it, and Kertis accepted an invitation to buy a partnership.

Good luck, Kert. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 22, 1922

Billiards on the right, the Black Diamond Garage on the left. Photo courtesy Washington State Historical Society, Asahel Curtis photographer, 1925.

Billiards on the right, the Black Diamond Garage on the left. Photo courtesy Washington State Historical Society, Asahel Curtis photographer, 1925.

We fear some of the other camps may feel we’ve been unduly enthusiastic about some of our assets, such as boxers, ball players, etc., and so we’ll try and be a little modest in the matter of our renovated pool hall. But, Boy! If there is anything in this neck of the woods, outside of Seattle, that can hold a candle to it, we’d like to see it. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, February 1992

By Ann Steiert

booze roomIn the museum we have taken one small room and converted it into our “Booze Room.” In it we have a restored cider press, assorted bottles and glasses along with a whiskey still.

On the wall is a sign telling everyone that during National Prohibition Days bootlegging was our No. 2 industry. Many people get a charge out of that. We tell them a bit of how it was in those days when the country was dry.

At that time many people made and sold liquor. The county sheriff was the famous Matt Starwich. He was a many faceted person. He was a fearless officer and did his duty but he was not averse to taking some extra money if it were offered to him. (more…)

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