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Posts Tagged ‘post office’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 1, 1926

Black Diamond has always maintained a reputation for turning out championship teams in baseball, but in the season which just closed, the camp held the distinction of honoring two soccer football teams, both of whom made splendid records.

In the group shown above are gathered the following players: Front row, left to right, “Chick” Thompson, Chas. “Red” Towers, A. Maroni, R. Durnac, John Ogden; second row, Chas. Maroni, Jas. Strang, Vic Roberts; back row, P.J. Gallagher, J.T. Hollow, and “Boots” Pierotti. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 20, 2007

The former railroad depot, built in 1886, in Black Diamond now houses the Historical Society Museum. Down Railroad Avenue the current book store is visible. It has also been King’s Tavern. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

Featured speaker at the Maple Valley Reunion, Sunday, Feb. 25th, will be Mayor Howard Botts of Black Diamond. The 1 p.m. program at the Grange Hall on Highway 169 at 216th is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Mayor Botts, who was born and raised in Black Diamond, will relate the histories of the two towns and how they have been connected over the years by the highway, the railroad, once upon a time, as well as other similarities. He’ll also discuss, “what is coming down the road; hopefully, new homes and new businesses.”

He said, “It is always interesting to talk about my home town.” Botts has served as mayor for 24 years and before that served several terms on the City Council in the 1960s and then during the 1970s, he was a member of the Planning Community. (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, February 12, 1997

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

BLACK DIAMOND — The proposed annexation of Lake Sawyer to Black Diamond has no fatal financial flaw and may even provide a property tax cut for lake residents and a beginning budget surplus for the city, a study concludes.

Annexing the fourth largest lake in King County, more than 500 acres of mostly suburban residences and 1,450 more people, however, couldn’t be done without some consequences for both the city and people of Lake Sawyer. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maple Valley Bugle, February 2000

Story and photos by Barb Nilson

William D. Gibbon descendants attend historical society program January 17: grandsons Gary and Ronald Gibbon; great-grandson Lance Gibbon, great-great grandson Noah, granddaughter Dorothy Church and great granddaughter Carol Church.

The pot belly stove was missing but the memories were warm as pioneers gathered in a circle January 17 to recall swapping gossip around the stove at the Gibbon/Mezzavilla store, buying penny candy, selling cascara bark, etc.

Six descendants of W.D. “Billy” Gibbon, including his three grandchildren, brought old-time photos, the actual glass jars that held the coveted penny candy, and a metal carrying box that held cookies.

Present were the offspring of Chester Gibbon, W.D.’s only child: two sons, Ronald of Seattle, and Gareth (Gary) of Edmonds; daughter, Dorothy Church, Renton, and her daughter Carol Church, Arlington; great grandson Lance Gibbon of Maple Valley and his son, Noah. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 23, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The town of Fairfax, declared the “prettiest mining town around,” showing the turn-table at the extreme right above center. Mine buildings are in front and the school is on the left. Carbon River runs through the trees at the top or the photo. (Original copy from Mr. and Mrs. Tony Basselli.) Photo courtesy of Steve Meitzler, Heritage Quest Press, Orting, WA., publisher of the book, Carbon River Coal Country.

Riding the Northern Pacific Railroad to the upper end of the Carbon River Canyon or tooling along to Mount Rainier in a Model T, tourists would pass close to three mining towns: Melmont, Fairfax, and Montezuma.

First, beyond Carbonado, was Melmont, situated between the Carbon River and the NPR line. A bridge spanning the Carbon River ran between the company hotel and the saloon with the depot and school on the hillside above. On the left end of the bridge was the road connecting to Fairfax. This bridge was nearly a little beyond the high bridge which spans the canyon today. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS The Bugle, January 1995

Can you guess where and when this picture was taken?

This photograph was taken in the early 1940s by Chester Gibbon. He drove in from the Maple Valley highway on the Pipeline Road and went to the edge of the hill a little west of the point where Highway 18 now drops down into the valley.

In the foreground is Bain Road, and the Vickery and Perry homes and outbuildings. The PC [Pacific Coast] and Milwaukee trestles are at right. In the center of the picture can be seen the old grade school and the gym.

In the middle at left is the false front of the Maple Valley Tavern. An old building that served as the post office and residence of Postmistress Miriam Mahaffey is just below the school.

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