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Posts Tagged ‘post office’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1969

Before the Pacific States Lumber Co. closed its mill in 1939, Selleck was a neat little town with a school, meeting hall, water system, and post office.

The mill superintendent lived in house number 1, the company doctor and supervisors lived in the 300 row, and mill hands lived in the 200 and 500 rows. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 6, 1913

Ten thousand dollars’ worth of damage resulted from fire in mining town

These buildings were located where the Green River Eagles #1490 is today.

BLACK DIAMOND, Wash., Saturday, June 6—Fire early this morning completely destroyed the Black Diamond Hotel and annex and the Gibbon Hotel, all owned by Frank W. Bishop, the Black Diamond meat market owned by Pete Fredericksen, and the Bowen residence owned by J.H. Bowen. Damage resulted to the post office building owned by Charles McKinnon and the ice cream parlor owned by John E. Davies. The loss is approximately $10,000.

The fire started about 1 o’clock and in less than ten minutes after the fire whistle commenced to blow every man and woman in the little village turned out to fight the flames. After three hours of fierce fighting all danger was past.

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 7, 1979

(This is the second in a series of feature articles written by students in Tahoma’s Beginning Journalism class. Steve Eichelberger, a senior, lives in Hobart where he became acquainted with Dorothy Iverson. She remembers when her small community housed the largest lumber mill in the Northwest.)

By Steve Eichelberger

Dorothy Iverson and her son, Warren, at their Hobart store. Dorothy remembers Hobart in the days of its lumber mill and the Hobart Bunk-Hotel.

Dorothy Iverson and her son, Warren, at their Hobart store. Dorothy remembers Hobart in the days of its lumber mill and the Hobart Bunk-Hotel.

For many years, Dorothy Iverson was a homemaker.

“Women didn’t work in those days,” she said about her early life in Hobart. Mrs. Iverson was born in Seattle where she lived with her three older brothers and three younger sisters before moving to Hobart while in the seventh grade.

She remains there today where she still helps operate the Hobart store.

Mrs. Iverson attended school in what is now the Hobart Grange and graduated from Tahoma, where she had been editor of the high school newspaper and class valedictorian.

She attended Wilson Business College in Seattle and after graduation was a secretary in Seattle for four years.

She married the late Iver Iverson in 1933 and they set up housekeeping in Hobart. Iver was employed at his father’s grocery store, the “Wood and Iverson Grocery Store,” where he continued to work until it burned in 1939. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 15, 1978

Hellos and goodbyes were expressed last week at the Black Diamond Post Office; goodbyes to Betty Godfrey and hellos to our new postmaster, Gerald Mongrain.

Betty has served since last August in the interim position of Officer-in-Charge for the Postal Service. She has been on loan from Issaquah where she served as head window clerk and where she will now return. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 3, 1979

By George and Dianne Wilson

The year 1978 saw the City of Black Diamond with a new mayor, a new librarian and assistant, and the establishment of an independent Community Services Center with a new coordinator.

The city, facing severe financial problems, raised levy rates on the telephone and power companies as well as assessing a B and O tax on all firms doing business here.

February brought a new postmaster, and A.R. Botts celebrated his 90th birthday in March. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 17, 1986

By Jim Simon

You load sixteen tons and what do you get,
Another day older and deeper in debt,
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’’t go,
I owe my soul to the company store.

“Sixteen Tons,” by Merle Travis

It has become part of our folklore: the brutal, indentured existence of miners and millworkers eking out a living in sooty company towns. We all know it was a life of oppression.

But don’t tell that to Edna Crews. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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